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American Gods [TV Tie-In]: A Novel

American Gods [TV Tie-In]: A Novel

Geschrieben von Neil Gaiman

Erzählt von George Guidall


American Gods [TV Tie-In]: A Novel

Geschrieben von Neil Gaiman

Erzählt von George Guidall

Bewertungen:
4/5 (712 Bewertungen)
Länge:
20 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Nov 11, 2003
ISBN:
9780060735586
Format:
Hörbuch

Anmerkung des Herausgebers

Dark & otherworldly…

Not just for the fantasy lover, realists will also relate to this dark and otherworldly criticism of American idolatry and deeply emotional tale of love lost.

Beschreibung

The storm was coming...

For the three years Shadow spent in prison, all he wanted was to get back to the loving arms of his wife and stay out of trouble for the rest of his life. But days before his release, he learns that his wife has been killed in an accident, and his world becomes a colder place.

On the plane ride home to the funeral, Shadow meets a man who calls himself Mr. Wednesday, a self-declared grifter, who offers Shadow a job.Shadow, a man with nothing to lose, accepts. But he soon learns that his role in Wednesday's schemes will be far more dangerous than he could have ever imagined.

American Gods is a dark and kaleidoscopic journey deep into myth and across an America at once eerily familiar and utterly alien. Magnificently told, American Gods is a work of literary magic that will haunt the listener long after it has been heard.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Nov 11, 2003
ISBN:
9780060735586
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

NEIL GAIMAN was awarded the Newbery and Carnegie Medals for The Graveyard Book. His other books for younger readers include Coraline (which was made into an Academy-Award-nominated film) and The Day I Swapped My Dad for Two Goldfish (which wasn’t). Born in England, he has won both the Hugo and Nebula Awards. You can learn more at www.mousecircus.com.


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Was die anderen über American Gods [TV Tie-In] denken

4.1
712 Bewertungen / 544 Rezensionen
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  • (4/5)
    I've been meaning to read this one for a long time, though various factors have intervened. It was indeed good. I particularly liked Wednesday, and Shadow was strangely winning for such a deliberately blank protagonist. I liked the Lakeview sections, but I found that they distracted quite a bit from the main thrust of the book. The cast of supporting characters and the historical interludes add a great deal to the book's charm and richness.Audiobook-specific note: I'm not sure I'd recommend listening to this one as an audiobook. I think the action would benefit from a faster reading than this form provides. Also, while Guidall's reading is generally excellent, his voice for Laura partakes of the annoying falsetto he sometimes uses for attractive or flirtatious female characters, which made her even less sympathetic as a character than she already was.
  • (4/5)
    I thought this book was very interesting and had a unique voice. I loved that all the ancient gods are living among us, slowly fading away as they are forgotten. I liked the portrayal of the new gods media, technology, roads, etc.

    The book follows Shadow, and ex-con who finds himself right in the middle of a war between the old and the new gods. In order to really enjoy this book, you just have to give yourself over to it and go where it takes you. This is basically what Shadow does, and what the reader should do to.
  • (4/5)
    The writing in this book was really enjoyable, writing that made me want to read it out loud. I did eventually notice that the vocabulary used in this book was less exciting than I expected, lacking in beautiful words despite the beautiful sentences. The plot of the book reminded me of a thriller, with lots of action and lots of sex. I was a bit disappointed by how much this book resembled the archetypal thriller, since I’ve not been in the mood for thrillers lately. However, the writing was far above average, as was the creativity of the plot. The integration of mythology into a book that otherwise would fit neatly into the thriller genre was an exciting twist. And the plot twists at the end caught me completely off guard in the best of ways. Overall, I think this was probably Gaiman’s version of a thriller; I think I liked it far better than I would have a more stereotypical book in that genre; and I think there are probably other books of Gaiman’s that I would be blown away by. I’ll definitely be looking to read more of his work.

    This review first published on Doing Dewey.
  • (5/5)
    I came to this book with no knowledge of it's vast cult following. All I knew was that the author also wrote Coraline. I did not read the summary, and so I dove in blind. So glad I did that!! The reviews can't help but spoil the sense of discovery.

    The book begins with a man, Shadow, awaiting his release from prison, just trying to keep his head down and not do anything that could delay his freedom. He senses a "storm brewing" and there is a feeling of uneasiness. And then things unspool, and it is a story unlike any I have ever read! I was so glad I did not know what this book was about, I felt like Shadow as he tries to figure out what is going on and what his role is/will be.

    Midway thru the book I caved and read some other reviews on this site, and found a link to a website about the book ( only the gods are real) and it's cast of characters, as well as a blog by the author. Fun!

    This is a special 10th anniversary edition of the novel, and the author was allowed to re-jig the text to his liking, adding portions that had been edited out from earlier printings. There is also an introduction and several additional notes at the end.

    There seems to been consensus that this is a book that warrants rereading, as those who have done so say they find more and deeper meaning. I can see revisiting this book in a few years!
  • (3/5)
    This is among the darkest of Neil Gaiman's books (and most of them are somewhat dark). I never got bored reading this, although with the Author's Preferred Text, there were some meandering sections that I felt were better left out.
  • (5/5)
    Rich, dark, interesting, frightening, beautiful to read. An instant favourite.
  • (3/5)
    I truly wanted to like this book. But the novel never achieved that magical moment where I was 'in' the story and the plot became compelling. The premise was good, the characterizations were interesting (I liked Shadow) but the appearance of his wife Laura threw me off and I didn't like the intrusion of this dead woman. The story became so convoluted, I was constantly derailed trying to work out what was going on. I never really felt that Mr. Wednesday was an Odin-based character, either. Maybe I've been influenced by many other Norse God tales, which I liked better.
  • (5/5)
    An outstanding book, beautifully read. The edition I listened to included an interview with Mr. Gaiman, which was delightful.
  • (4/5)
    I read this a number of years ago, and remember feeling fairly "meh" about it. Nevertheless, I was excited to hear it was being adapted into a TV series. I watched most of the first season with a friend who loved this book, who had read/listened to it multiple times, and who would nitpick the changes with me (hardly any of which I remembered) after each episode.The whole thing got me curious for a reread, but I'd offloaded my copy years and years ago, I thought the new copies were ugly (what is with this terrible new cover aspect ratio I'm seeing all over sf shelves?), and no used copies seemed to exist in stores, because of the TV show.I was shocked when I saw a reasonably priced copy (that looked just like my old copy -- bonus!) at Curious Books, so I snatched it up immediately.I definitely got a lot more out of it this time around, due to premade emotional connections to the characters via the TV show, but I suspect more importantly, that this time around I know approximately 1600% more about Norse mythology. Of course, it's not only the Norse pantheon that is important in this book, but it's pretty front and center.Speaking of which, surrounding the final conflict and its resolution are a series of reveals of various characters and mysteries in the story. Before my reread, I only remembered ones of these reveals, and that was probably what I would have told you the book was about, had you asked. This time around that part of the storyline felt much less central, as I got more about of the Norse-related portions.Lesson learned: while a familiarity with Norse myths is not absolutely essential, I'd say it definitely would increase your engagement with this book. Fortunately, Norse mythology is now kind of everywhere in our culture, thanks partly to the MCU and also to Neil Gaiman himself.
  • (5/5)
    One of the best books I've ever read. I have now become a huge Neil Gaiman fan!
  • (4/5)
    A fairly well done and engaging audiobook that simply didn't work for me. I love Ron McLarty who does on of the main characters and the rest of the cast were very good but this book just did not hold my attention.
  • (3/5)
    There's no way I could ever review this book. On the surface, it's a book about Shadow and gods of other cultures. But it's so much more and yet it's just that. Gaiman has written a book that is extremely readable. However, the book is deep and inhaling the book isn't an option.
  • (5/5)
    Loved this book.
  • (5/5)
    Best novel of Gaiman's
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful book. Very evocative.
  • (4/5)
    Great book, bad ending.
  • (3/5)
    Loved the idea, enjoyed the writing and the characters. The actual story was meh. The pacing was bad. Chapters felt longer than it needed to be thanks to ~15 page "Coming to America" side stories about characters and events that have no effect on the story. These sections always popped up when the book finally managed to hook me in and really took me out of the story. My favorite parts of the book happened in Lakeside where it mostly abandons fantasy and gods in favor of relationship building and a little mystery. What's the point of certain gods gaining power? None of them did anything with the power they had. Exception for an old man.
  • (4/5)
    This is one weird book. It`s a battle between good and bad. there are Gods,living dead not only is there a battle between the gods but also the main character Shadow battle with his conscience. Well written, colorful characters you either love this one or not but it`s an interesting read.
  • (5/5)
    As with all Neil Gaiman books, I began reading without a peek at the description or reviews. Because his writing is a journey with twists and turns - best to go in and enjoy the ride. In the beginning, I tried to figure out with the plot was. But then I gave it up and just let the story go where it may. I'm not even sure I can describe it well if I tried, so I'll just say it was a great read! The story is so much more than I expected.
  • (4/5)
    American Gods was one hell of a labor of love. I've had the book sitting on my bookshelf ever since it was in talks with the big guns in Hollywood that someone might pick it up. Well, a couple of weeks ago it was confirmed that STARZ got the rights and will be making it into a television series. So I decided it was time to read the book rather then let it keep collecting dust.I really enjoyed the story, even the stories within the story, the mythology on how "gods" weren't born in America, but traveled over with the people that came here. And how those gods slowly were forgotten and how new gods, created by the age of technological advancement, started taking over. American Gods is deep, heavy, thought provoking. I enjoyed the variety of colorful characters, gods of old (Egyptian, Norse, Biblical, Indian etc.) in disguise as humans and had fun figuring out who they were with the subtle and sometimes not so subtle hints Gaiman dropped along the way. Shadow, the main protagonist, was a very interesting study that I originally thought was kind of dull but ended up becoming a very well rounded character by the end of the novel. My problem, thus the reason for the 4 star rating, is because, as I stated above, it was a labor of love. There is no doubt that Gaiman is a great storyteller, however, the story got bogged down with tedious details. There were parts I wanted to skip, but then I feared I would miss something big if I did. There were just details within the scenes that could have been cut out. For example, I didn't need to know that someone cooked Shadow bacon and eggs and how it was placed on the plate, and how it was placed on the table and what he poured himself to drink and how he sat down, and how long it took him to eat, etc., etc. Where the hell was his editor? On the flip side to all the unnecessary details, this will, no doubt, be a great thing for the creators of the television adaptation. They have so many details at their fingertips to work with. I will also say that I look forward to seeing how they bring some scenes to life on screen. My favorite part of the story (slight spoiler) is when Shadow rides on the "World's Largest Carousel" and some of the magical creatures that are on this Carousel come to life. How are they going to show him riding a griffin? Or how will they portray some of the gods in their natural form, such as Ganesha (Hindu god, half elephant, half man) or the Egyptian gods Horus & Anubis? I definitely can't wait to see how they make these things come to life!American Gods is a unique tale of gods, those that have been forgotten and those who are fighting not to be. If you have a nice chunk of time set aside to get lost in a story, I definitely recommend it. Even better, this may be worth an audiobook listen. Rest those eyes and let someone else take you on the journey.
  • (4/5)
    Gods take a road trip, visit the House on the Rock.
  • (5/5)
    O.K. Neil Gaiman gets one of my rare 5-star ratings. American Gods is one of the best fantasy books I've read. Very nicely written, no lack of humor, plenty of suspense; the story begins well, ends well, and the in-between is fantastic.Neil Gaiman gives a nice examination of the gods of old mythology and the "gods" of new worship. A hefty read at nearly 600 pages, but every page is worth reading. Interspersed with the main story are several short pieces relevant to the book as a whole. The book would have been just as good without them, but with them we get an excellent feel for the author's imagination and love of his work.Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    Great book, by turns funny and serious, it is about Shadow and his travels through the netherworld.
  • (4/5)
    This book is not how I remember it. And, I don't think it lives up to the hype. The story is well written, its full of interesting characters, I especially liked Laura, the dead wife. But for the story itself, well, something seemed off about it - I just couldn't get into Shadow's Character. Mr. Wednesday is interesting, as well as the other powers. I think the high point of the story was the town of Lakeside - which isn't quite what it seems.
  • (3/5)
    I have previously read Gaiman's book, Neverwhere. American Gods is reasonably similar in style. I had a harder time suspending disbelief for American Gods for some reason, but maybe that was intentional by the author. There are some very interesting characters and plot developments. I didn't enjoy this as much as Neverwhere, for some reason, but there is a lot to think about, and you would probably pick up a lot on a second read.
  • (4/5)
    A great big meandering river of tales, all heading in the same direction and coming together, although this may not be immediately apparent to the reader or characters.
  • (3/5)
    In the preface to the 10th anniversary "author's preferred text" edition of "American Gods," Neil Gaiman says that his book seems to divide people who either really love it or really hate it. I would actually fall somewhere in the middle. "American Gods" will appeal strongly to some people, and may not appeal even to those who have enjoyed certain other of Gaiman's books. It is perhaps better viewed as a work of magical realism in the vein of Haruki Murakami than as what most people think of as fantasy, which it is often labelled. I found the concept incredibly intriguing: what happens to all the gods and mythical creatures that are a part of traditional life in the "old country" when immigrants come to America? I had the pleasure of hearing Neil Gaiman speak a few days ago, and he described having written about four pages of "The Graveyard Book" before deciding that the idea for the book was a better idea than he was a writer. He put the pages away and came back to the concept about ten years later. Perhaps "American Gods" is another idea that was just too big for Gaiman's talent at the time, or perhaps I was just a tad disappointed because his take on the book's concept is simply not what I thought it would be. It takes a long time, about 2/3 of the way through the 500+ page book, for the many frayed edges of the story to start to be woven back together. He incorporates elements of so many different religions and mythologies that it seems hard to imagine any author not struggling with such a gargantuan task. Especially near the end, the character perspective shifts frequently in ways that make it hard to keep up with whose inner monologue you are hearing. The twist at the end makes me feel like I would have to read this book a second time to go back and see if there were clues along the way that I didn't notice. At the same time, while the meandering style and massive character list make this a challenging book to get through, I enjoyed the reading process along the way. The book is being adapted for television, and it feels almost as if it were written to be suitable for an "X-Files" type of series, where each episode does not necessarily connect to every other, but there are overarching connections that you don't perceive instantly. If you need for all details to fit tightly together into a cohesive picture with a clean wrap-up at the end, then this is not your book. If you like being led to think and don't mind ending your thought process with more questions than answers, than this is quite possibly a book you will enjoy.
  • (4/5)
    Wow! Very interesting and, IMO, very different for Neil Gaiman. It felt a little bit more like Stephen King (Dark Tower series) or Dean Koontz (Odd Thomas series), and I really enjoyed it!
  • (4/5)
    My first Neil Gaiman book, and i was not disappointed, i had heard an interview with him on Radio 4 where he talked a little about the book and read a line or 2, it was enough for me to listen a bit more and decide its worth a try.
    The book is a complex and enjoyable tail, with some interesting twists and turns, sometimes predictable but that doesn't stop the enjoyment.
    this book kept me up at night reading it, which for me was a new experience, i could hardly wait to press the kindles on button and stare at the pages filled with tales of Gods, crooks, spooks and other gods of all types. apparently its a story about america with deep meanings and philosophical questions if you are to take on what the snobs tell you, for me it was journey with a man who had nothing to lose being played by gods with attitude issues. sure it has other things to say, but enjoy it, don't over think it. its a novel, a good one but its not history, philosophy or magic.
  • (5/5)
    This story is so odd, it meanders, and intertwines, and plods, then careens forward. Overall I enjoyed it, the mixture of a road trip, and the dreamscape interludes that peek in along the way, and the Gods we learn about, it makes me want to learn more about them. So many different cultures have brought a mythos, or theos(?) and they've all found different ways to be, and to grow.