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Rich Dad Poor Dad: What The Rich Teach Their Kids About Money - That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!

Rich Dad Poor Dad: What The Rich Teach Their Kids About Money - That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!

Geschrieben von Robert T. Kiyosaki

Erzählt von Tim Wheeler


Rich Dad Poor Dad: What The Rich Teach Their Kids About Money - That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not!

Geschrieben von Robert T. Kiyosaki

Erzählt von Tim Wheeler

Bewertungen:
5/5 (3,045 Bewertungen)
Länge:
6 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 5, 2012
ISBN:
9781469202617
Format:
Hörbuch

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Anmerkung des Herausgebers

Buck conventional wisdom…

“You’re either a master of money or a slave to it,” Kiyosaki asserts in his landmark book that challenges conventional middle-class wisdom about hard work and saving money. Learn to make your money do the work for you.

Beschreibung

Rich Dad Poor Dad will…

  • Explode the myth that you need to earn a high income to become rich
  • Challenge the belief that your house is an asset
  • Show parents why they can't rely on the school system to teach their kids about money
  • Define once and for all an asset and a liability
  • Teach you what to teach your kids about money for their future financial success

Robert Kiyosaki has challenged and changed the way tens of millions of people around the world think about money. With perspectives that often contradict conventional wisdom, Robert has earned a reputation for straight talk, irreverence, and courage. He is regarded worldwide as a passionate advocate for financial education.

"The main reason people struggle financially is because they have spent years in school but learned nothing about money. The result is that people learn to work for money… but never learn to have money work for them." - Robert Kiyosaki

Rich Dad Poor Dad - The #1 Personal Finance Book of All Time!

"Rich Dad Poor Dad is a starting point for anyone looking to gain control of their financial future." - USA TODAY

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 5, 2012
ISBN:
9781469202617
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch


Über den Autor


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  • "You're either a master of money or a slave to it," Kiyosaki asserts in his landmark book that challenges conventional middle class wisdom about hard work and saving money. Learn to make your money do the work for you.

    Scribd Editors

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    A well-written book. I was very hesitant to buy this book because of all the negative comments i have been reading but I am glad I did not listen to those comments. This book was able to achieve for me what it really aims to do: To inspire the reader to invest.
  • (5/5)
    Very easy read and was well worth time to read it!As the author states many times through out the book you should make money work for you, you should not work for money. I have to make some changes and Robert pointed me in the right direction. I hope that I can impart all of this knowledge to my children as they grow up...If not I can always have them read this book!
  • (4/5)
    Very American in that it repeats itself at least three times. Expect to finish this book in 3 hours tops. Given its popular theme and style, it still is an interesting read. How one applies his/her life, has a direct result on the fruits one reaps. What I liked most about this book is the idea of building a money machine. Put your creativity into building something that will keep generating income on its own and irrespective of how little time you invest in it. Because this for me is essential in business. You 'child' needs to be taken care of initially, but increasingly it will stand on its own feet. And eventually it will take care of you. If that potential is lacking, leave it be and invest your times differently. An easy and quick read with good retention and practical value.
  • (4/5)
    This changed thinking about wealth generation in many ways. The math is flawless and simple enough for everyone to understand. Perhaps the consistent example of owning homes and renting them out, and some other examples, are too focused. I wouldn't be surprised if many readers of this ran out to buy a 2nd home to rent out and slowly gain equity on an asset, funded by renters. The backstory of having a second father is a bit of a stretch and I found this a bit smarmy, and detracting from the main value, and distracting. Once beyond the 'two fathers' backstory however, it becomes not only factual, but motivational. The last third of the book talks a lot about why readers of the book won't use its principles to create wealth, and ways to break through them. I would say this is a must read, and the earlier in life and more consistently, the better.
  • (4/5)
    One of the best book. I recommend it.
  • (4/5)
    This was sugggested to me by my Finical Coach quite a few months ago. I finally got around to getting the abridged audio book version. I really wish I had got a full version because the info was good. Kiyosaki is even tougher than Dave Ramsey. I think its a good complement to Ramsey as without Dave's direction fo getting out of debth, Kiyosaki's direciton on investing and ensuring you don't work for money would seem out of reach. I'm still not clear on how I'm going to get there but I am at least motivated in hand. Kiyosaki's poor dad isn't someone I would call poor. He's his real dad. An educated teacher, and later administrator, working in the public school system. Poor Dad, like myself, didn't want to make money, because rich people are evil. His Rich Dad is his friend Mike's Dad who taught him how to get money to work for him, but not lecturing but making him work for nothing. Starting with a story about how ot make money where young Robert and Mike counterfeit nickels out of old lead toothpaste tubes. Mike's Rich dad says that having no money is the root of all evil because it is what makes people do stupid things. The moor money poor dad made, the less he is at home (this has been me as of late) while the more money rich dad made, the more he was home with family. This is something that is worth working for. I'm still scared of Risk. When I still struggle to pay bills its hard to think past the end of the month, but I'll make it. I really will.
  • (4/5)
    A very interesting book with a new perspective in what constitute wealth and what is really an asset for a person. Kiyosaki may be optimistic and make it sound just too easy, so the book may lose perspective, but as he recognizes, being rich is an attitude but you need also education, and he ping points other resources to get that education.
  • (5/5)
    Very inspiring and eye opening. This book is one of the things I have been searching for. Answers to my questions that has been bothering me for more than a decade has been finally made clear. This book should be read by many a student to be able to face a future where employment seems to be the only answer to financial problems in life. It's very easy to understand and very easy to follow. I hope to read more of Kiyoaki's works in the future--especially those that concern the sophisticated subjects of investment and business management. It's a book that one should never miss reading in a lifetime.
  • (5/5)
    I read this book while at a friends house for the day- and it gripped me until I finished it. It wasnt in my genre but after my recommendations I decided to check it out and I must say I loved the advice given.Not only did it change my outlook on money and spending but it also changed my outlook on life. It was so bad I filled my facebook status with a new quote every couple hours it was that good. Im not sure if I'll be wealthy after putting these theories to work but I will say that itll change the way I pursue all of my endeavors. The writing style is approachable and its a quick read. Certainly worth a day of your time41/2 out of 5
  • (4/5)
    Finally finished this book. Not that it was a chore to read, it was more that the information in it was so facinating that I needed to go back and re-read sections. This book is a permanent collection book for sure! Also, to truly be able to execute on the premises laid out in this book I will need to go back again and again to feed the ideas into my subconcious mind.

    I highly recommend this book to everyone. Robert Kiyosaki and Sharon Lechter do an excellent job of describing Robert's experiences with handling money. This book was a 30,000 foot overview of handling money however and does not go into too many detailed specifics. It focuses more on a positive mental attitude and ideas that are risky but if executed correctly and with persistence, can make one wealthy. I also plan on investing in Robert's other works as I feel he will expound on these ideas. Robert, loosley bases the premise of having two dads with oposing views on handling money. If I can fault Robert for anything in this book, it would be that he assumes the fact that having money will make you happy. This fault is dicey at best because if you are of the mind that you are happy financially where you are, then go read something else. Robert makes no judgement call on anyone's particular lifestyle, he is just answering the question he probably gets asked most of the time, "How did you get so rich?".
  • (3/5)
    I know this is a money classic but I found it rather dull and the author very unattractive. Basically, get your money to work for you in investment, shares etc rather than working a job for it. Nothing wrong with the concept but the book itself wasn't a lot of help in getting there. Much better books on personal finance and investing out there.
  • (2/5)
    I read this book while in an Entrepreneur phase. On one hand, it is rather inspiring, in a John Madden sort of way. You see, John Madden (American football broadcaster) always makes everything sound easy, which may be how he coached the Raiders to the superbowl. He'll say something like "now what they need to do here is score a touchdown. I think that if they can do that, they will turn this game around".I still recall a memorable game where a quarterback's contact fell out, and while he and the refs looked for it, Madden said "now here's a guy who when he wears glasses, he can see better". When it's explained in such a simple way, it really seems like the easiest thing in the world. Unfortunately, one must remember that the 6'5 defensive line is not just going to roll over and say 'uncle'.And real estate isn't any easier. There's always some conflict around the corner to trip you up and send you back to square one (or even square negative one). So, while this book gives you such excellent advice as "learn from failure", "make profitable deals", and "work hard for yourself", it doesn't actually give you a system or method to make money.This seems a strange irony to me, as this book is clearly marketed to people who are not smart enough to realize that they should 'work hard and not give up' if they want to succeed, but who are smart enough to be able to figure all the rest of the logistics out by themselves.Now, there are supplementary books that give a lot more in-depth information, but they still tend to fall into similar traps. It seems to me that you are either the self-motivated entrepreneur-type, or you aren't, and that difference will show itself often and early. The self-made may use this book, but to continue projects they are already working on, not to start their 'dream business' from scratch.There is another option for the marketability of this book, but it is not one I like to think about: depressed people who feel their lives going nowhere and stave off depression by clinging to untenable dreams. For these types, self-help and new age books act like a surrogate (or additional) religion: bolstering their self-esteem and making them feel as if their dreams are truly within reach.Then, years go by and the dream draws no nearer. They get depressed. Then they whip out this book (or another one) and suddenly feel like their millionaire retirement is only 6 months away! Then they do nothing again.I'm not saying people shouldn't have dreams, and I'm definitely not saying not to follow them, and I know people get attached to their denial, but it's not going to make your life any better.Now, I know that most people who (don't say 'peddle', don't say 'peddle') market these self-help (or new age) products are not usually scam artists. Most of them believe in what they do; they believe that they are helping people; and I hope sometimes they do.However, there is a difference between being a doctor and telling someone they have cancer to help them move on and lying that there is no cancer because it seems more 'kind' or 'uplifting'. The latter, is, of course, morally reprehensible (said the atheist).Kiyosaki has built an empire off of this book, and made himself a pretty penny. He has also been researched by some critics who have challenged his assertions about his wealth, real estate successes, and the very premise of the book. There is no evidence that his 'rich dad' ever actually existed, and Kiyosaki has said in interviews that the character is, at best, a combination of people. However, at other times he has stated that he definitely does exist. And that doesn't even go into his support of Casey Serin.Maybe I'm wrong, maybe you will buy this book and it will turn your life around, maybe Kiyosaki is relating a true story of struggle and inspiration, but maybe not, maybe it will just be another $5 in his pocket and less room on your bookshelf for Chekhov.
  • (4/5)
    This is one of my favorite finance books.
  • (4/5)
    Very inspiration, if not just a spur to get one to understand the importance of financial eduction. Some simplistic catchphrases "Not 'I can't afford this,' but 'how can I afford this." He asserts people are lazy in their financial thinking. His Solution is learning about tax loopholes and other ways to keep your income going into your assets and not liabilities. He ends with the insightful, if you need something; be it friendship, money, or the like.. give that away to someone else.
  • (4/5)
    A worth while read; full of examples and enthusiasm
  • (5/5)
    One of the most stimulating books read, during my teens. Kiyosaki showed the possibilities of getting rich with a change of mindset. It also affirms what I've suspected about: "go to school, get a good grade, get a good job, and enjoy life".
  • (5/5)
    I can quote many parts of this book! This teaches need verses want. Teaches you if its not an asset to your life then loose it. It's direct and to the point and makes so much sense. Everyone should read this book once in their life. I've lended out every copy and let them keep it because they loved it like I did. I need to get another copy again. It's a book you can go back and reference over and over. This book isn't a story it's learning what you've always known however it's written in a way you can relate and think" wow I always had the feeling I shoudve done that"
  • (4/5)
    Great advice
  • (5/5)
    A great financial book. Highly recommended. I really love it.
  • (5/5)
    An eye-opener. Recommending this book to anyone who wants to learn which things to prioritize when making money.
  • (5/5)
    Really insightful, cannot wait to read more in the rich dad poor dad series
  • (5/5)
    The most important book on finances you need to listed too. Even (Specially) if you already know the basics, Robert Kyosaki really puts the information into a form that is simple to understand.
  • (5/5)
    Just finished listening to the audiobook​ version of Rich Dad Poor Dad and I loved it. It serves as a nice insight into the different frames that the two classes hold on money; one demonizing it and the other using it to make more of itself. Very impressed and actually learned new things, a definite recommended​ read. Starting down the path of raising my Financial Intelligence.
  • (4/5)
    the book is tremendously informative and inspirational. The only thing to criticize that too much blame is on the poor and there are some examples stated to prove financial smartness, I am afraid to say I think they are considered as cheating and deceiving
  • (5/5)
    Every one needs to read/listen to this book.. if you want to bee free.. out of the rate race..
  • (5/5)
    The ideas are timeless and still relevant in today's uncertain markets. Many thanks for this, should have read this years ago along with all of Grant C's books. Building up the library now with both sets.
  • (5/5)
    This is a great read for anyone seeking financial security and freedom! If you're like me, you did not come from a wealthy family so many of the habits and beliefs that were passed to you prepared you to be poor not rich. This book can help to evolve your thinking to a wealthy wavelength which will reap benefits in both the short and long term.
  • (4/5)
    Although the book is poorly written, it offers some good advice. Has certainly changed my attitude towards money, and increased the range with which I look forward into the future. Don't expect miracles, but it will definitely improve your relationship with money.
  • (5/5)
    Good friend of mine recommended this for me and every minute I spent on this was great, lots of good stuff in there.
  • (5/5)
    Loved it! Such amazing advice. Wish I listened to this at 20.