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The Forgotten Man: A New History

The Forgotten Man: A New History

Geschrieben von Amity Shlaes

Erzählt von Terence Aselford


The Forgotten Man: A New History

Geschrieben von Amity Shlaes

Erzählt von Terence Aselford

Bewertungen:
4/5 (26 Bewertungen)
Länge:
14 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 12, 2007
ISBN:
9780061472961
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

It's difficult today to imagine how America survived the Great Depression. Only through the stories of the common people who struggled during that era can we really understand how the nation endured. In The Forgotten Man, Amity Shlaes offers a striking reinterpretation of the Great Depression. Rejecting the old emphasis on the New Deal, she turns to the neglected and moving stories of individual Americans, and shows how they helped establish the steadfast character we developed as a nation.

Shlaes also traces the mounting agony of the New Dealers themselves as they discovered their errors. She shows how both Presidents Hoover and Roosevelt failed to understand the prosperity of the 1920s and heaped massive burdens on the country that more than offset the benefit of New Deal programs. The real question about the Depression, she argues, is not whether Roosevelt ended it with World War II. It is why the Depression lasted so long. From 1929 to 1940, federal intervention helped to make the Depression great—in part by forgetting the men and women who sought to help one another. The Forgotten Man, offers a new look at one of the most important periods in our history, allowing us to understand the strength of American character today.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 12, 2007
ISBN:
9780061472961
Format:
Hörbuch


Über den Autor

Amity Shlaes is the author of four New York Times bestsellers: The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression, The Forgotten Man/Graphic, Coolidge, and The Greedy Hand: How Taxes Drive Americans Crazy.  Miss Shlaes chairs the board of the Calvin Coolidge Presidential Foundation and the Manhattan Institute's Hayek Book Prize, and serves as a scholar at the King's College. A former member of the Wall Street Journal's editorial board, Miss Shlaes published a weekly syndicated column for more than a decade, appearing first in the Financial Times, then in Bloomberg. 

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4.2
26 Bewertungen / 14 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    Just so good. I had forgotten how much I enjoy Crais. Great character development, tight plots that aren't trite or predictable, good pacing ... love it all.
  • (5/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    great book recommend anyone who loves US history should read.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (2/5)
    An elderly man is found murdered in a downtown Los Angeles alley and Elvis Cole is called to the scene to identify the victim. He doesn't recognize the man. However, the detective who found the man reports that he possessed a folder containing clippings of newspaper and magazine articles about Cole and the last thing he said before he died was that he was Cole's father. Given that he never knew his father, Cole attempts to learn the identity of the man and to determine whether he really is his father.This isn't one of Crais' better efforts. I found it was hard to maintain interest and put the book down for a few days several times. Perhaps the next book in the series will rebound. I also find it getting boringly predictable that all of the cases The World's Greatest Detective investigates always end in a shoot-out and that typically Joe Pike or Elvis Cole is shot, stabbed, or otherwise seriously injured. By now the two must be little more than scar tissue. Come on, Crais; try to come up with a surprising ending.
  • (4/5)
    From The Book Cover:

    In an alleyway in Los Angeles and old man, clutching faded newspaper clippings and gasping his last words to a cop, lies dying of a gunshot wound. The victim claims to be Elvis Cole's long-lost father - a stranger who has always haunted his son. As a teenager, Cole searched desperately for his father. As a man , he faces the frightening possibility that this murder victim was himself a killer. Caught in limbo between a broken love affair and way too much publicity over his last case, Cole, at first resists getting involved with this new case. Then it consumes him. Now a stranger's terrifying secrets...and a hunt for his killer...give Cole a frightening glimpse into his own past...and he can't tell if it's forgiveness or a bullet that's coming next.

    My Thoughts:

    Although The Forgotten Man is not anywhere near the book that The Last Detective was, Robert Crais continues to lead his readers into the whirlwind world of Elvis Cole and keep the series alive and thriving. There is complexity here, and some surprises at the end, and Robert Crais fans will be begging for more Elvis Cole when the story concludes. Only 4 stars because there was some parts that for me added nothing to the story and made little or no sense of why they were even included.


    My Thoughts:

    Although The Forgotten Manis not nearly the book The Last Detectivewas, Robert Crais continues to plunge his readers into the whirlwind world of Elvis Cole and keeps the series alive and thriving. There is complexity here, and some surprises at the end. Robert Crais fans will be begging for more Elvis Cole when the story concludes. A 4 star rating because there were parts in the story that added nothing to the plot or the story line and frankly I couldn't sort out why they were even included.
  • (3/5)
    Don't get my rating wrong, I enjoyed this book. The but is that the earlier books spoke to me because of the humour and Elvis' take on being a detective. This book is later in the series and is more of a typical crime thriller and disappointed me with the darker tones and lack of humour. Essentially, I enjoyed the book, but it wasn't what I was expecting from an Elvis Cole novel.
  • (5/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    great book and well researched. Really opens mind to a different look of the Great Depression

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (3/5)
    In this entry in the Elvis Cole series, we learn some of Cole's background. We learn about his mentally ill mother and his youthful search for his father by running away to carnivals and circuses where he thought his father worked as a human cannonball.The story opens when a man who has been shot in an alley tells the detective who finds him to tell Elvis he is his father and that he is sorry. This revelation brings back to Elvis and us the story of his youth. We also learn a little about the origins of his friendship with Joe Pike. Starkey, another detective we have met before declares her love for Elvis to herself but can never tell Elvis. Then there is Lucie who left Elvis in the preceding novel in the series because it was too dangerous to be near him who shows up in this one briefly to create more turmoil in Elvis mind.Payne Keller, the man who claimed to be Cole's father, has another son who is mentally deranged who thinks Cole killed Payne. The son who Cole dos not know exists plans revenge which leads to frantic violent end for a few people.This is another brisk story with a twisting plot that keeps you turning the pages. It would be especially enjoyable for readers who live in Los Angeles for he describes his drives through streets and past landmarks that would add an aura of authenticity to the story. I actually followed his route on Google Maps at one point.
  • (4/5)
    Elvis Cole is searching for the person who has murdered a man who claims to be his father for whom he has looked and never found. A lot of Elvis's childhood is brought forth here as his childhood stories unfold as he seeks to solve the mystery.
  • (5/5)
    THE FORGOTTEN MAN begins with a horrifying glimpse into a house where a triple homicide has taken place. It is only later that we work out what relevance this has to the main story.This is a gripping story, made more poignant by the fact that Elvis Cole has been searching for his father all of his life. But the more Elvis, the "world's greatest detective", investigates the dead man in the alley, the more he is convinced they are not related. Why then did Herbert Faustina say he was, and why did he have a heap of press cuttings about Elvis Cole?The listener is helped in tracking the multiple points of view from which this story is written by the narrator identifying the character at the beginning of each chapter, if a narrative point of view change has taken place. It doesn't seem that this was used in the original printed version.You can read most of the first 90 pages of THE FORGOTTEN MAN online on AmazonThis is #10 in the 13 title Elvis Cole/Joe Pike series. It was nominated for a Shamus Award.
  • (3/5)
    This is the second book I've read by Robert Crais with Elvis Cole as the lead character. Although the writing was good, the plot was somewhat predictable and left me a little disappointed.Elvis Cole fans will still enjoy Crais' writing style and his ability to get inside each of his characters and bring them to life.
  • (4/5)
    If I had to come up with a "problem" to talk about with this book, it would be to say that it's a little predictable but only because the story in the prologue seems to have nothing to do with the rest of the book. When I stopped to ask why, I figured out the mystery of the book.What I loved most about this book was that Crais was able to give a unique voice to each character. It probably has something to do with James Daniels (the reader on the audio book) but I think Daniels was able to read each character this way because of the material Crais gave to work with. At one point in the story, Carol Starkey makes a phone call to Elvis Cole. I won't tell you what was said because that will give away an important part of the story, but I was impressed with how Crais wrote Starkey's lines in her own unique voice while still writing from Cole's point of view. The exchange was also a perfect example of the miscommunication between a man and a woman that showed both sides. I thought to myself, "How can this man know how to write a woman so well?"Speaking of unique voices, I must also mention that Daniels is fairly talented at voices. I loved the different voices he used to each character, especially Joe Pike. He sounded like a cross between Kris Kristofferson and Clint Eastwood.Like I said, I predicted the end of the book but this did not stop me from enjoying the book any. I highly recommend this book.
  • (3/5)
    Quite a good detective story. A good twist at the end, but the build up is quite slow.
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite "airplane" authors. Very absorbing read and fast paced. Love the ElvisCole books.
  • (3/5)
    Not as good as some of his others; the ending was sort of dissapointing.