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The Dark Tower: The Dark Tower VII

The Dark Tower: The Dark Tower VII

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von George Guidall


The Dark Tower: The Dark Tower VII

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von George Guidall

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (347 Bewertungen)
Länge:
28 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Sep 21, 2004
ISBN:
9780743561716
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

All good things must come to end. Constant Listener, and not even Stephen King can write a story that goes on forever. The tale of Ronald Deschain's relentless quest for the Dark Tower has, the author fears, sorely tried the patience of those who have followed it from its earliest chapters. But attend to it a while longer, if it pleases you, for this volume is the last, and often the last things are best.

Roland's ka-tet remains intact, though scattered over wheres and whens. Susannah-Mia has been carried from the Dixie Pig (in the summer of 1999) to a birthing room -- really a chamber of horrors - in Thunderclap's Fedic Station; Jake and Father Callahan, with Oy between them, have entered the restaurant on Lex and 61st with weapons drawn, little knowing how numerous and noxious are their foes. Roland and Eddie are with John Cullum in Maine, in 1977, looking for the site on Turtleback Lane where "walk-ins" have been often seen. They want desperately to get back to the others, to Susannah especially, and yet they have come to realize that the world they need to escape is the only one that matters.

Thus the audiobook opens, like a door to the uttermost reaches of Stephen King's imagination. You've come this far. Come a little father. Come all the way. The sound you hear may be the slamming of the door behind you. Welcome to The Dark Tower.

Freigegeben:
Sep 21, 2004
ISBN:
9780743561716
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Billy Summers, If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


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4.5
347 Bewertungen / 92 Rezensionen
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  • (4/5)
    I was determined to finish this series before the film is released and I did. It's a chunkster but I enjoyed the conclusion though there were a few shocks along the way. I thought the end worked because as Star Trek The Final Frontier found out, if you search for God (or the Dark Tower), you can't actually find it without losing your audience. So I didn't expect a big reveal at the end. I enjoyed the Dark Tower series but I didn't fall in love with it. Glad I have read it but it won't be a favourite.
  • (4/5)
    great book
  • (5/5)
    GREAT ending!
  • (4/5)
    I do remember crying my eyes out when finished reading this book and the end of the series.
    I am going to re read. That is one thing I know for sure.
  • (3/5)
    I liked the ending of this book. It was surprising to me, and a logical fit. I felt a nice sense of accomplishment after finishing this book/series. That is odd for me, as finishing a book doesn't do that for me. King writes this series is a topic that runs through all/most of his stories. I think this concept grew over time. When he wrote Gunslinger back in 1970, I don't think it was with a plan. It feels to me the goal is to sell books, and not the literary / spiritual message that is communicated. That is fine with me because the books are worthy.I read the first five books in 2010. I got sick of the series, but came back to them this year, 2013, and enjoyed the last two books. Here are my comments about the series, with my rating:Gunslinger (Rating: 2 stars)This is the first of seven books. I probably will read the others, but this one didn't make me want to run out and get them. One time a person who works at the library asked me if the Dark Tower was worth it. I hadn't read it so didn't know. Figured I would find out.The Drawing of the Three (Rating: 3 stars)This was a tough one to rate. I liked it better than Dark Tower I. However, it gets the same number of stars. Book one was Roland hiking across his world to get to this book. This book was a few short stories getting the players together. I am not a fan of short stories. EDIT: 3/26/2011 - after finishing the fifth Dark Tower book I went back and re-rated previous books. Thus this one now has more star than the first one.The Waste Lands (Rating: 3 stars)Same reaction to this book as I had to the first two in the series. Okay, but nothing special. I have no urge to start the next book. I will eventually. Here are series I think are better: Hyperion Cantos, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, Jack Ryan, Joe Kurtz, John Corey (need to read the Lion EDIT: 4/14/2013 - I hated the Lion), Lord of the Rings, and Harry Potter.Wizard and Glass (Rating: 4 stars)This is the first Dark Tower book I really enjoyed, but hated that I knew one thing that was going to happen at the end. The spoiler was in the very first Dark Tower book. Got to give Stephen King a break though. He wrote 'Wizard and Glass' 20 years after the first Dark Tower book.Wolves of the Calla (Rating: 3 stars)King described my feelings about the novel very well on page 476 of this 709 page book: "All the rest had been ritual and preparation, necessary but not terribly helpful." Four hundred seventy six pages of not terribly helpful, not terribly exciting, not terribly page turning, but not terribly terrible material was painful to get through. However, the rest of the book, page 476 to 709, was helpful, exciting, and page turning. Not enough for me though. I will take a short break before picking up the next Dark Tower installment.Song of Susannah (Rating: 4 stars)After a disappointing fifth installment of the Dark Tower series, this book, the sixth and next to last one, was well done. The series is reminding me of the television show Lost: time traveling, supernaturally type beings (others = low men,) and, in a hard to describe way, the feel, plot, scenarios, ka? of the whole thing. I am looking forward to checking the last book of the series out of the library. That is very different from how I felt before checking this one out.The Dark Tower (Rating: 3 stars)I liked the ending of this book. It was surprising to me, and a logical fit...Afterward: I recall reading a comment that it was pretty full of Stephen King to write himself into the books. I didn't feel that way, until I read the afterward when he asked his constant readers not to write him or stop into his home for a visit. Mr. King, I have no interest to do either. However, if you want to write or visit me, I would be honored.
  • (3/5)
    All I can say is that I am utterly dissapointed with how this series ended. I spent over a year reading through the whole series, and also Wind Through the Keyhole...even stopping to read through the entire volume of Everything's Eventual because it had a story about Roland in it. To end like this seems....well, it IS a dissapointment. It was as if Stephen King didn't know how to end it, so he took a cop-out instead. Very very dissapointed.
  • (4/5)
    The Dark Tower - Stephen King ****After many thousands of pages Roland finally arrives at the lifes objective, the foot of the Dark Tower. Unlike many of King's books I really enjoyed this ending and felt the story was complete.Many of the familiar characters are present in this 'will they or won't survive' conclusion. I don't want to give too much away but King's dual ending (he gives the reader the choice of whether to stop or not) really was a stroke of brilliance.A fitting conclusion to a magnificent series. :)
  • (5/5)
    Final episode of the Dark Tower. Since i've re-read them all in english, i think they're even better. Amazing twist in how the 'real' and 'fiction' dimensions are interwoven here. Harsh read in the end, no happy ending. But that's how it must be. Ka.
  • (4/5)
    Finally... the end. A bit anticlimactic, considering I have been reading this series for about 20 years. After all the time I put into this, I am left feeling perplexed and disappointed about the ending and especially about Mordred... I worried so much about his presence and what he was going to do to the ka-tet. Wow, what a let down. Then I felt the whole ending was just really ... blah. I loved the first part of this series, the first four books were wonderful, but after Wizard and Glass it just didn't do anything for me. I almost feel like King lost interest and then he had his accident, and it really changed the feel of the series, but he felt compelled to finish it because so many fans wanted it. The Dark Tower had it's moments though, very sad when our beloved characters start dropping off, and I had a hard time adjusting to the idea of what Susannah does as they get closer to the Tower. And then the whole drawing and erasing thing - I kept thinking - that's the answer?? All I can say is I'm glad I finally finished it. I began reading it in print but switched over to audiobooks with the last three books, maybe that had something to do with my ambivalence towards them, but something tells me they just were not up to the same caliber as the first four.
  • (4/5)
    The finale of Kings opus is as contoversial as it is long. Sometimes it seems to start tying everything up for the sake of ending the saga, but it's all worth while. Culminating in an ending that will not be to everyone's taste, it is nonetheless an epic conclusion worthy of Roland himself.
  • (5/5)
    An amazing series and a breathtaking finale. An ending that makes the years invested in this series worth it. Makes you want to go back and read the whole thing again from the beginning.
  • (5/5)
    As far as I'm concerned. This book ended the series perfectly. Whether you read the very last section or not. I could not imagine how Stephen King could possibly end this story, and I found that I liked what he did with the story, though I understand how it might frustrate some people! I won't say anything else because I don't want to give away the ending...but honestly, can you actually imagine any different ending than he gives us?
  • (4/5)
    Not quite as gripping as the earlier ones, or at least not for all 600+ pages. Had a satisfying ending, which is a trick with something like this.
  • (1/5)
    A Wretched End to a Great StoryI used to rate The Dark Tower among my favorite SF/fantasy stories right up through book 4 (Wizard and Glass), despite the early warning signs even back then. The "Captain Trips"-devastated Kansas that our heroes found themselves in after debarking from Blaine the Mono, and the trip to the Emerald City of Oz at the end of the book, were indications of some of the problems the series was to develop. Tying most of his previous works together into this one epic was unnecessary, and the series as a whole suffered from it. King apparently lost his groove during the long hiatus between books 4 and 5, and never got it back. After peaking with book 3 The Waste Lands and plateau-ing with the story of Roland's youth in book 4, the books 5 and 6 that eventually came out were pale shadows of the preceding volumes.And then we come to the final part of the series. Issue one: Ubervillains like The Ageless Stranger (oftimes known as Flagg, Marten, and a whole legion of other names) and Modred, and even The Crimson King, turn out to be laughable as threats after the buildup they've been given. Two: From almost the very beginning we've been told that there is something wrong with the continuum of all the worlds, and that they face total destruction, and that the only way to save existence is to go to the Tower -- and in this book it turns out that destroying the breaker community at Algul Siento is all that is needed to halt the decay; the remaining beams will heal themselves, and Roland does not have to proceed to the Tower. This basically means Roland's quest was never really what we thought it was, and there should have been no need for the ending we got ... which brings me to ..... Three: I don't know how I would have written the end of the story. It's not my job -- it was King's, and he fell down on the job. After the build-up of the Tower being the linch-pin of all worlds, and the lecture about scale and size in "The Gunslinger and the Dark Man" way back in book 1, the cop-out of the "here we go again" ending is an insult to the Constant Readers, and the preemptiveness of King's defensive "stop reading here if you don't want to be disappointed" admonition is just rubbing salt in the wound. A series as good as this one has been for over half of its run deserved better than this.I don't even know where to start with the smarmy, contrived situation that Susannah ends up in, with Eddie, Jake, and even Oy returned to her. It's like saying "it's okay that all the people she loved were killed, because here they are again, almost as good as before!" The replacements cheapen the deaths of their predecessors. And King's presence as a character in the last two books was every kind of suck.I still love this series, and I can see myself rereading it -- but I don't think I can bring myself to go past book 4 any more.
  • (5/5)
    This is an exceptional series! It took me forever to start reading it. However once I started, I couldn't put it down.

    King paints such great images in his stories. It really feels like you are being pulled into the story as well.

    I would suggest this series to anyone who loves a great cliff hanger!
  • (3/5)
    Finally finished these all after having started them way back in like '86 or '87. Didn't really enjoy them all as much as I would've liked, but the end of it all WAS surprisingly satisfying. King pulled out a trick at the end that I frankly didn't think he had in him.
    Overall, I think the journey was worth it for me, since I started them SO long ago and as such have a bit of soft spot in my heart for the story of the gunslinger. Not sure if I'd actively push this on anyone else though.
  • (3/5)
    I LOVE the Dark Tower Series, but wanted to throw this one across the room when he put himself in it. Again. It wasn't a horrible ending, but King could have done better.
  • (5/5)
    I love this series of books and was very happry with the ending. I don't think anyone really expected a happy ending for Roland, and if they did, Oh Well. Writing doesn't get any better than this.
  • (4/5)
    Roland finally catches his Tower in a book that represents a rather amazing rebound from the dreadful Song of Susannah. Looking at the Dark Tower series as a whole, one can track King's progressively self-indulgent writing; The Dark Tower is no different in that regard as the storytelling doesn't even approach being economical. It is, however, an unexpectedly emotional experience- something I'd reckoned we'd be cheated out of after the disaster that was book six. As for the controversial ending, I have no problem with it. I found it to be surprisingly good, and I think it's the right one. It would have been even better, though, if King hadn't broken in on his own story to wonder aloud why anybody even cares what's in the Tower; maybe this is a tacit admission that even he realizes what a turd Susannah had been. In short, The Dark Tower is a reasonably strong conclusion to a series that seemed destined for greatness, then disintegrated, becoming considerably less than the sum of its parts.
  • (3/5)
    When I started reading the "Dark Tower" series, I was enthralled with the character of Roland. I thought the concept, while not totally original, was exceptionally well done. After book four, I felt the edge begin to slip from the storyline. King is still a masterful storyteller, however, throughout the saga. It is only through the graces of his storytelling ability, and my personal desire to, like Roland, see my quest through to the end, that I continued to read this last book. It was that bad.There is nothing original in the last book. Every device was telegraphed, so there were no surprises in the plot. I fully anticipated the arrival of characters from previous stories, arriving deus ex mechina, to save the day. Even the trite ending of the book was exactly as expected. It was almost as if the author felt compelled to fill his unwritten contract with his "constant reader" and deliver a final installment, even though his heart had gone out of the project.What kept me slogging trough the pages was King's rich descriptions and wonderful dialog. What is really sad is that even when Stephen King is writing a mediocre story, he is way better than a lot of his contemporaries. If I were rating this on plot alone, it would be a sad two star rating.At points in my reading journey with Roland and friends, I waited several years between installments for the next book to be delivered. I was satisfied with installments when they finally did arrive. Each was a well crafted story, carrying the plot further along, filling in background to Roland's world. I almost wish that King had not delivered the last installments and the we were either forced to wait for a return of the inspiration that gave us the first three volumes or this forever remained an unfinished masterpiece.
  • (4/5)
    Although I've read the first three books of this series a half dozen times each, this is only my second reading of this, the final in the series, and it holds up to my initial impressions. I could lose myself forever in King's tales of Roland and his companions. An epic tale and an adequately epic finale. Also, in a move completely uncharacteristic of his previous writings, King takes time to plan an ending that doesn't fall flat and leave the reader disappointed.
  • (4/5)
    This was the weakest of King's Dark Tower series. It is still a brilliant novel filled with adventure and characters that by this point are nearly tangible. However, this story does seem to drag out, and although everything is neatly wrapped up and the ending is quite satisfying, it kind of reminded me of (the uncut version of) the Stand at the end of which I wondered: why couldn't we have gotten here 200 pages ago?
  • (5/5)
    A wonderful ending to a wonderful series, even though most disliked the ending, i found it to be perfect, as it needed to be. However, the final battle was very anti-climatic which was dissapointing. Other than that i loved it.
  • (5/5)
    I had to wait over 20 years for this book. The first book in the series came out in the early 80s. It's strange, but I was really ready for it to end. I felt like our characters had been searching forever! I really enjoyed the way King provided "the ending," "the epilogue," "coda," poem, and "author's note." It provided the alternative endings and addressed the issues that were still in my mind. That's what I LOVE about Stephen King, he knows his audience, or "Constant Reader" as he called us, so well that he anticipated our thoughts about the conclusion.
  • (4/5)
    The final long-awaited installation of the 7 book Dark Tower series. The final 3 books, I have mixed feelings about. I like that this book brought the narrative home to the Browning poem, "Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came". I found the circular nature of the narrative pretty much the only believable result to the story that had been created, but yes, slightly unsatisfying. Mordred never quite worked for me and OH, OY!!!! I wept. Charcaters I'd spent so many years caring about (I picked up the first 3 volumes in high school, so it had been a good 10 years I'd been waiting for the conclusion of their stories)came to their own ends, and my heart was a little heavy for them. I don't know.Overall, the series is marvelous. But I feel like it really hits its peak in The Drawing of the Three and The Waste Land.
  • (5/5)
    It's over, and yet the end has me wishing for ever more. Things wrap up quickly here, and perhaps not in the way we would wish, but in the way it must be. What Roland finds at the Dark Tower, also, is perhaps not what we hoped for, but what we know, deep down, is the only thing he CAN find. After this novel, I found myself more impressed with Stephen King than I even had been. He's always been able to tell a story, but here we see him telling a story purely in the way the story should be told and not, necessarily, the way the audience wants it told. It is better because of that. The Dark Tower has been a wonderful and moving ride. I look forward to rereading this one again and again.
  • (5/5)
    12-16-2006 I just "finished" this novel. A heart-wrenching ending to this long tale. For now, I'm heeding Sai King's urging not to read the final chapter. It is enough for me. Say thankya.
  • (5/5)
    I was left speechless and angry at the end, but upon further thought I understand why King took the path that he did when writing the final installment. I still feel somewhat speechless, but not really angry anymore.
  • (5/5)
    There really was no other way this epic story could have ended. I get shivers just thinking about it.I'm not even going to bother summing this book up. If you haven't read the previous books, pick up The Gunslinger right now. I mean, now. I'll wait for you to catch up... If you've read through book 6, you can't just stop (even though Song of Susannah was a little slow at times). If you've finished The Dark Tower, you know what I'm talking about.There are very few books that are able to evoke strong emotions in me, but amazingly, this one still manages to do it on repeated readings. (It's the line "...I can plant something. Is there anything you'd think he would like?" "Yes, a rose." that gets me every time.) I won't be forgetting Jake's innocence, Eddie's sarcasm, Susannah's vulnerability, Oy's wisdom, or Roland's steel blue eyes anytime soon. This book is, as Susannah would say, "the good kind, mit schlag."
  • (4/5)
    This is the second time I've finished both this book and the Dark Tower series. While I still feel the first 3 or 4 books of the series are the strongest I can't deny that I finished this last book with a slight smile and a bit of sadness at saying goodbye to Roland and his compatriots. After Song of Susannah it's refreshing to once again return to Roland's world with it's many mysteries and rich backstory. If there's anything that King has managed to accomplish with this series, it's the creation of a richly detailed world with endless possibilities for future stories. I look forward to what he and others will be able to create using it's detailed tapestry of history.