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Let Them Eat Fruitcake

Let Them Eat Fruitcake

Geschrieben von Melody Carlson

Erzählt von Pam Turlow


Let Them Eat Fruitcake

Geschrieben von Melody Carlson

Erzählt von Pam Turlow

Bewertungen:
4/5 (9 Bewertungen)
Länge:
7 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Sep 10, 2008
ISBN:
9781608142828
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

An entertaining and humorous look at the relationship dilemmas of four unlikely female friends who share a small bungalow while launching their careers.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Sep 10, 2008
ISBN:
9781608142828
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

Melody Carlson is the prolific author of more than 200 books for women, teens and children. The recipient of numerous writing awards including the Rita and the RT Career Achievement Award, she makes her home in Oregon with her husband.


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4.0
9 Bewertungen / 4 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    I love these books. Kendall, Megan, Anna and Lelani are just great girls to read about. They have their ups and downs just like the rest of us.
  • (3/5)
    Melody Carlson is best known for her Christian young adult novels... and I hate to say it, but it shows. The thing is, she developed some very real, flawed, honest characters in this novel about a group of women who are friends (albeit some don't get along as well as others) and the changes that are going on in their lives. There's only one blatant Christian girl, and she isn't overbearing, but fits right into the story and the group of women. Others are struggling with their faith or Catholic upbringing, another doesn't believe in anything and spends her nights partying and hooking up with random guys... truly, I thought the character development was excellent, and I wanted to spend more time with these women......just not in the context of this book. Sadly, Carlson can create characters, and then seems to stick them into writing that's highly reminiscent of her young adult work. Some phrases were very juvenile, and the ending of the novel seemed like she didn't really know what to say (the last 3 or 4 sentences were painful, they were so amateur and cliche). Will I look for another book in this series? There are 5 more already out. It's possible... it was an incredibly fast read, and I have high hopes that the writing will improve and the character development will carry the stories... so I guess we'll see.
  • (3/5)
    A contempoary Christian "chick-lit" novel about four, single housemates all in the early to mid-20s. I'm not the target audience for this book, but the title was fun and the back cover made it seem interesting. I guess I've never learned that whole "don't judge a book by its cover" thing.Now, I have to admit I've only seen one episode of "Sex and the City" and that was only because it featured a guest-star turn by Sarah Michelle Gellar. So, my exposure to that show is limited, but I get the feeling this is a series intended to be "Sex in the City" for the contemporary Christian crowd. You've got four single women from various backgrounds, trying to figure out their careers and love lives, all while having various interactions. I think the biggest difference would the four are friends in "City" and that's not necessarily the case with each of the storylines here.What I liked most about the story was that the characters weren't drawn as black and white. Each young lady had her own past, her own issues and faced trials and tribulations that felt authentic. One character in particular, Kendall, could have come off as being evil or judged harshly by the author for some of her choices over the course of the story. But Melody Carlson allows us to see enough of Kendall's story from her persepctive to at lead understand what motivates and is leading her down the path she chooses. We may not agree with the choices she make and there are several that we just know are going to turn out wrong for her, but Carlson still allows her to make the mistakes up to and including stalking a married man she had a one-night stand with. Watching her inner rationalization that he'll leave the wife for her if she just shows up is fascinating and frightening. And that's just one character thread here. The stories are all loosely connected around the girls' interactions at the house and their desire to throw a Christmas party on Christmas Eve. The novel keeps coming back to the party as the driving factor and helps things all build to a necessary point in the final few pages. There are some resolutions, but Carlson leaves a lot of stories unresolved, setting up a sequel to come sometime early next year. She also ends the story on a cliffhanger of sorts. While it's not lifethreatengly massive, it may be enough for me to pick up the next story and see where things go next.
  • (5/5)
    I love Melody Carlson because she doesn't force her characters to be more than they are - nobody gets converted in the eleventh hour - she admits that there are issues that aren't black and white - and I can pick up one of her books, knowing that I'll be entertained and not preached at.