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Carthage: A Novel

Carthage: A Novel

Geschrieben von Joyce Carol Oates

Erzählt von Susan Ericksen und David Colacci


Carthage: A Novel

Geschrieben von Joyce Carol Oates

Erzählt von Susan Ericksen und David Colacci

Bewertungen:
3/5 (5 Bewertungen)
Länge:
19 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jan 21, 2014
ISBN:
9780062268303
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

A young girl's disappearance rocks a community and a family in this stirring examination of grief, faith, justice, and the atrocities of war from Joyce Carol Oates, "one of the great artistic forces of our time" (The Nation)

Zeno Mayfield's daughter has disappeared into the night, gone missing in the wilds of the Adirondacks. But when the community of Carthage joins a father's frantic search for the girl, they discover the unlikeliest of suspects—a decorated Iraq War veteran with close ties to the Mayfield family. As grisly evidence mounts against the troubled war hero, the family must wrestle with the possibility of having lost a daughter forever.

Carthage plunges us deep into the psyche of a wounded young corporal haunted by unspeakable acts of wartime aggression, while unraveling the story of a disaffected young girl whose exile from her family may have come long before her disappearance.

Dark and riveting, Carthage is a powerful addition to the Joyce Carol Oates canon, one that explores the human capacity for violence, love, and forgiveness, and asks if it's ever truly possible to come home again.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jan 21, 2014
ISBN:
9780062268303
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch


Über den Autor

Joyce Carol Oates is the author of over seventy books encompassing novels, poetry, criticism, story collections, plays, and essays. Her novel Them won the National Book Award in Fiction in 1970. Oates has been a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters for more than three decades and currently holds the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professorship at Princeton University.   

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3.0
5 Bewertungen / 7 Rezensionen
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  • (2/5)
    Started off very good, then went on and on and on ? swamping important and interesting themes in too much of everything.
  • (4/5)
    This novel was a bit of a muddle for me, at times so, so good and at others, painfully labored. It's about a missing girl and the effect of her disappearance on her family and the accused perpetrator. That's the surface story anyway. Deeper, it's an exploration of alienation and misperception, and about the dark currents often flowing just below placid surfaces. Oates' characters are both sympathetic and infuriating, their actions and motivations perfectly understandable at times and completely inscrutable at others. It's this kind of complexity that I loved, despite my struggle with some parts of the book.
  • (4/5)
    I have never read this author but she came highly recommended from a friend. I loved the book, although the middle section that was relevant but at times too detailed and long. The book is dark and the main characters not that likable, if fact I'm not sure I really "liked" for any of the characters.Despite this, I read the book straight through and if has left me thinking. That's a compliment!
  • (4/5)
    In the small Adirondacks town of Carthage, New York, 19-year-old Cressida Mayfield goes missing. The prime suspect in her disappearance is a severely wounded Iraq war veteran who happens to be her older sister's fiance. I don't want to say much more about the plot, because it's twisty enough that every time you think you've got a hold on something or someone, it turns out you don't. I love how Joyce Carol Oates takes a fiction genre and plays around with it until it is more than the sum of its parts, while remaining completely respectful of the genre she is borrowing. Here, the whodunit aspect is legitimately suspenseful, but the reader's attention is more strongly drawn to the the seething emotions of the characters. I didn't quite know what to make of Cressida - is she on the autism spectrum or not? - but I was drawn to her in all her brittle unlikability.It's an odd book. It's dark. Joyce seems to delight in confounding the reader! I do have to wonder about all the exclamation points and italics. They seem to be an Oates trademark, but in this book they really struck me.
  • (4/5)
    Very, very long because you are seeing the story from several points of view and yes, they are all different and Joyce Carol Oates is a master of detail. I was listening to this while I was working on something else---I'm not sure I would have finished it if I had been reading it.
  • (3/5)
    An overly long examination of what happens to the family and friends and victim when a teenage girl goes missing.
  • (4/5)
    I felt like this book took me forever to read. The fist half of the book I had trouble finding a character that was likable. It wasn't until the last several chapters that I could really find any redemption for them. Joyce Carol Oates is a master at exploring the darkness of humanity.