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Night Shift

Night Shift

Geschrieben von Ilona Andrews, Lisa Shearin und Milla Vane

Erzählt von Angela Dawe


Night Shift

Geschrieben von Ilona Andrews, Lisa Shearin und Milla Vane

Erzählt von Angela Dawe

Bewertungen:
4/5 (41 Bewertungen)
Länge:
13 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Nov 25, 2014
ISBN:
9781494571955
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

New York Times bestselling author Nalini Singh delivers a smoldering story with Secrets at Midnight, as the scent of Bastien Smith's elusive lover ignites a possessiveness in him that's as feral as it is ecstatic. And now that he's found his mate, he'll do anything to keep her.



In #1 New York Times bestselling author Ilona Andrews's novella Magic Steals, when people start going missing, shapeshifting tigress Dali Harimau and jaguar shifter Jim Shrapshire must uncover the truth about the mysterious creatures responsible.



In Milla Vane's The Beast of Blackmoor, a warrior princess must tame a savage beast to earn a place among her people. But she quickly discovers that the beast isn't a monster but a barbarian warrior who intends to do some taming himself.



It's seer Makenna Frazier's first day on the job at Supernatural Protection and Investigations, when bodyguard duty for a leprechaun prince's bachelor party goes every which way but right in nationally bestselling author Lisa Shearin's Lucky Charms.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Nov 25, 2014
ISBN:
9781494571955
Format:
Hörbuch


Über den Autor

“Ilona Andrews” is the pseudonym for a husband-and-wife writing team. Ilona is a native-born Russian, and Gordon is a former communications sergeant in the U.S. Army. Contrary to popular belief, Gordon was never an intelligence officer with a license to kill, and Ilona was never the mysterious Russian spy who seduced him. They met in college, in English Composition 101, where Ilona got a better grade. (Gordon is still sore about that.) They have co-authored four New York Times and USA Today bestselling series: the urban fantasy of Kate Daniels, rustic fantasy of the Edge, paranormal romance of Hidden Legacy, and Innkeeper Chronicles. They live in Texas with their two children and many dogs and cats.

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4.1
41 Bewertungen / 34 Rezensionen
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  • (3/5)
    Loved the story about Dali from Kate Daniels' series.
  • (4/5)
    I only read Ilona Andrews' "Magic Steals". It is a second Jim & Dali story, and it was good to "hang out" with them again. Jim gets to see Dali do Balinese magic, Dali gets to do some investigating, and their relationship progresses nicely.
  • (3/5)
    I was only familiar with half the writers in this collection. The Sighn story is set in her Psy-Changeling universe and this is more of a romance with a touch of mystery but doesn’t do anything to the overall story arc. Bastien scents a changeling in the city that he knows will be his mate and has trouble tracking it since it is so faint. Saying much more will give away the plot but it is a nice HEA story. The Andrew’s story is set in the Kate Daniels universe but doesn’t deal with Kate or Curran. This is set during the time frame of Magic Rises but deals with Jim and Dali. I liked the more info in Dali’s magic use and again this is a bit of a mystery with a HEA. The other two writers were new to me. Shearin’s story seems to be a bit of a backstory piece to her current series. Lots of our heroine floundering around at her first day of work and being tossed into the deep end of the pool. It was ok but not sure if I would bother to read any more in the series. The last story by Vane just rubbed me the wrong way. Looks like this is a pen name for another writer that I haven’t read but it seems the story is a stand alone. This was a high fantasy setting completely different than the urban fantasy feel of the other three stories. If it was me doing the collection I don’t think I would have added it since the setting was so different than the rest of them. The first two stories have were creatures in it so you get the shift in the title. The third story has a werewolf but not as the main character. The fourth story doesn’t have any shape shifters in it.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this collection - any time spent in the Psy-Changeling world or the Kate Daniels world is time blissfully and well spent. I didn't expect much from the other two stories by Shearin and Vane, but Shearin's was a wonderful surprise - funny, exciting and sexy! I promptly added the first book from her SPI series to my TBR.
  • (4/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    These were short stories, most on the long side and could almost be called novellas. I took the book out for the Kate Daniels story. I started the Nalini Singh story and didn't like it and didn't finish it. The Ilona Andrews story was really about Jim Shrapshire and Dali. It was a good story set in Kate Daniels' world. A fun good at Jim and Dali who appear in the other books quite frequently. I really liked the Dali character. The Lucky Charms story by Lisa Shearin was fun and I enjoyed it. I might look for some of her books. I started the last story by Milla Vane and decided I'd skip it. Not to my taste.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (3/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    I am marking this as read, since I have read the one story in it that I definitely wanted to read. That being the Ilona Andrews novella set in the Kate Daniels universe. It was fun, and I am glad I was able to read it.

    I will check out the other stories in the book, but they don't currently have nearly as much of a draw for me.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (4/5)
    This is a seriously good anthology. I enjoyed every sentence, every character and story. There is no difference between the authors I already knew to the new I discovered here because each short novel is beautifully written and made my heart beat faster.

    ★★★★★ Secrets at Midnight by Nalini Singh is simply...perfect *_*
    ★★★★ Magic Steals by Ilona Andrew is really good as well
    ★★★★ Lisa Shearin’s Lucky Charms is the funniest short novel I ever read
    ★★★★ The Beast of Blackmoor by Milla Vane is a fantasy story that gives the reader a whole new world to fall into with impressively detailed characters (yeah, now I know why it was so good...Milla is Meljean Brook!!)
  • (4/5)
    This was purchased with much enthusiasm for Ilona Andrews’ story, Magic Steals. If you’re enjoying the Kate Daniels’ series, you are going to love this novella about Jim and Dali. We’d been told that Dali was considered very special in her family and in this one we learn why. And you’d going to see a side of Jim we hadn’t witnessed before. Whoa. Mystery, magic, action, mythology and a romance that will make you feel good. 5 starsAnother of the author’s I’ve read before is Nalini Singh, although I’d stopped reading her books a few years ago. I always felt that if I was to fall in love with a shifter, one from her Psy/Changeling series would be the best, and I still feel that way after reading her story, Secrets at Midnight. Bastien catches the scent of his mate but things don’t make sense as the scent keeps disappearing in the middle of nowhere. He has to find her! It’s obvious to the reader that Kirby is a changeling, but she’s not aware of it, although strange things are now happening to her. A romance, the story moves along well but begins to falter making you think the story should have ended. But it does pick up again near the end. I enjoyed the characters, the situation and the romance. 4 starsI’d never heard of Lisa Shearin before but I liked her story Lucky Charms so much that I’ve gone ahead and purchased The Grendal Affair, the first full length book in the series. Lucky Charms is a precursor to that book, although I understand that you really don’t have to read this novella before reading the other book as much of this is recapped or even copied in the larger book. A human seer is recruited to join the SPI, a policing agency for the preternatural that most humans aren’t aware exists. Makenna is able to see through all glamour and she’s the only seer on the force. On her first day out in the field, she’s on a team that needs to find five leprechauns before dawn before the goblins find them first. There are a lot of different types of creatures, action and I enjoyed the humor in Makenna’s thoughts and speech. 5 starsMilla Vane is a pseudo name for Meljean Brook and I’m pretty sure I’d read at least one of her stories in another anthology and enjoyed it. I hate to say it, but I couldn’t finish this story, The Beast of Blackmoor. The setting is very dark and primitive and apparently the author went for a somewhat different speech and thought pattern to go along with this different setting as a female warrior, on a quest for a goddess, meets a male warrior who is suffering from the same goddess due to his actions in the prologue. There is no urban in this fantasy and I’m afraid that’s just not my thing. 2 stars as I couldn’t get past the first couple of chapters.
  • (3/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    I really enjoyed the world and characters from the first and second stories and will need to check out Singh's other work. The third story just wasn't all that interesting of a plot or world. The fourth had a crazy amount of graphic sex and violence and was set in a more traditional fantasy setting which didn't seem to fit the theme very well. So they average a 3 all together.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (4/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    I read three of the four stories in this anthology. The first was Secrets at Midnight by Nalini Singh and told the story of Bastien Smith finding his mate in kindergarten teacher Kirby who was raised human and in foster care and doesn't know that she is a shifter. I like Bastien's complete devotion to Kirby and Kirby's courage and determination not to be overrun by Bastien's more dominant personality.I also liked Magic Steals by Ilona Andrews which was a story about Dali and Jim. It was told from Dali's point of view and gave me an entirely new appreciation for her.I also read Lucky Charms by Lisa Shearin and liked it so much that I bought the novels in the SPI series. I loved the narrator's quirky viewpoint and her wonderful descriptions. I am also curious about what comes next for the characters. After reading Lisa Shearin's story I wasn't able to get into The Beast of Blackmoor by Milla Vane. I wasn't ready for a switch to high fantasy after urban fantasy. I'll give this story a try another day.All in all, this was an entertaining anthology. The high point for me was the introduction to an author I hadn't read who wrote the kind of stories I really like.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (4/5)
    Like other short story collections, there were hits and misses here, but the hits certainly outnumbered the misses and the misses did not miss by much. My favorites were Night Surf, Strawberry Spring, The Ledge, I Know What You Need and The Last Rung on the Ladder. I really enjoyed King's ability to evince a setting; with Night Surf, I felt like I was at the end of the world, staring over the edge on a beach. He also constructs meaningful characters even within the confines of 10 or so pages. The Last Rung on the Ladder stands as a testament to this, leaving the reader with a sadness and feeling of emptiness in the character that authors with far more pages fail to accomplish.
  • (3/5)
    My haphazard exploration of Stephen King's writing continues. This collection of some of King's earliest published work revealed to me a couple of new sides to him, including short story writer, and HP Lovecraft disciple. Yes, several of these stories are homages to Lovecraft. And, although most folks think of King as a writer of horror stories, he has two in here that are not genre fiction by any stretch of the definition; both are memorable.
  • (4/5)
    I liked this collection better than his later one. He seems to be simply trying to scare the hell out of you rather than get caught up in tyhe artistic trappings of his mature writings. These tale are raw and passionate. My favorites of King's short stories come from here.
  • (4/5)
    While I don’t count this as his strongest collection, there are some standout short pieces in Night Shift that I do like. I’ve always thought that King’s horror is more effective when it’s shorter and some of the stories are standouts—“Strawberry Spring,” “Sometimes They Come Back” and “Graveyard Shift” are definitely some of the scariest short pieces I’ve read.

    It’s also worth noting that there’s some great suspense and literary tales in here. “The Last Rung on the Ladder” is one of the most heartbreaking pieces King’s ever written, and “The Ledge” is a great little suspense tale. There are some clunkers in here (I’ve never been fond of “Night Surf” or “Battleground”), but overall, there’s a lot of good stories to pick up and read at your leisure.
  • (4/5)
    An excellent introduction to Stephen King literature with tales focusing on the paranormal, human persona and even the mortality of man. Genuinely adored some of the stories contained, though a few weaker entries kept it from hitting 5 stars in my opinion.
  • (4/5)
    Stephen King, back in the day, could spin a damn good yarn. It’s a shame that in the last decade or so he went a little odd – as I lamented many times while slogging through the end of the Dark Tower series – but he really had the spark in his youth. Night Shift, first published in 1978, is a collection of various short stories King had published throught the late 60s and the 1970s, at the very beginning of his long writing career.By and large I enjoyed most of the stories in here – particularly “Grey Matter,” “Trucks,” “Children of the Corn” and “One for the Road” – and found that quite a few of them hit that sweet spot of intriguing paranormal mystery. I like King not so much because he’s a horror writer – I’m never scared by what he writes, more “creeped out” – but because I find an engaging mystery to be an excellent form of fiction. I don’t mean a whodunnit mystery, with a group of diverse and enigmatic characters discovering a murder on a train in the 1920s and trying to figure out which of them did it. Those kinds of mysteries are boring. (Spoiler – it turns out one of the characters did it!) What I love is a good speculative fiction mystery, where something bizarre and inexplicable is happening – like the TV series Lost, the Priest’s Tale in Dan Simmons’ Hyperion, or the novel Inverted World.Where King falters in Night Shift is when he tries to explain the mystery, and usually does so with the Bible/witchcraft/demons. One particularly egregious example is “The Mangler,” an otherwise excellent story about a piece of industrial laundry equipment which keeps injuring and killing people, and which an investigating police detective feels has some kind of malevolent presence inside it. It should have been left at that – an inexplicable bloodlust in an inanimate object. That, for my money, is a lot more frightening (and, in terms of suspension of disbelief, plausible) than King’s explanation, which involves a witchcraft ritual and a possessive demon and a crazy set of coincidences. Once that sort of thing starts trickling in I find myself rolling my eyes, and unfortunately a fair few of the stories in this volume could have been a lot better than they are precisely because of this over-exposition. There are also two ordinary “literary” stories towards the end of the book, and if I want to read something with no horror, sci-fi or fantasy elements, there’s a fairly long list of authors I’ll turn to before Stephen King.Nonetheless, Night Shift is still a pretty good collection of short stories. A lot better than most anthologies I read, and a hell of a lot better than most stuff he’s written since the 1990s – although, with a lot of positive reviews for The Wind Through The Keyhole and 11/22/63, I may have to look him up again. I definitely want to read some more of his early works, and I have The Long Walk and The Running Man on my TBR pile.
  • (4/5)
    Overall – I really liked the first story, but after that the stories really seemed to taper off quite a bit until I got to Battleground. After that one, my interested was piqued and the book continued at a high level through The Ledge and on to the end with a few exceptions here and there raising my overall rating from a 6 to a 7.Jerusalem’s Lot – The first story is an “historical” account of the events that take place when a man and his faithful servant take residence in his ancestral home and explore the shunned ghost town of Jerusalem’s Lot. The story is told through a series of letters and journal entries and is very different from King’s normal style. It’s a bit slow, but still creepy.Graveyard Shift – A group of men who work in a factory are offered the “opportunity” to work over the 4th of July holiday cleaning out the basement of the factory. They discover a rat problem in the depths of the building that turns out to be worse than expected. This one was mildly amusing, not the best of the bunch.Night Surf – Post apocalyptic preview of The Stand. The super flu has run rampant and wiped out most of the population. For all that this small group of survivors knows, they are the last people on the planet. So-so, maintains interest because of The Stand.I Am the Doorway – A wheel-chair bound former astronaut with a strange affliction tells his friend about his vision of a crime that he is sure that he committed even though it is a physical impossibility for him to have committed it. This one took me much longer than it should have to finish. It did not keep my attention and frankly I was bored with it.The Mangler – A police officer investigates an industrial accident at a laundry. What he finds there turns out to be more than just an accident. I liked this story. It was engaging and kept the tension going through the end.The Boogeyman – A man speaks to a therapist about the deaths of his young children at the hands of the closet monster and the blame that he has taken upon himself for his part in them. Pretty darn good story…until the end. Just my opinion, but I though that the ending really sucked.Gray Matter – A man gets some kind of illness from drinking a bad beer and it begins to change his physical form. Not bad, this one moved along pretty well and had some decent suspense.Battleground – Excellent story. A hit man receives a box from his mark’s mother when he returns from a job. The suspense is built up really well and there’s a great ending.Trucks – This one is pretty good. It centers on a group of people who are trapped in a truck stop by a mob of possessed trucks. The movie Maximum Overdrive is based on this story and uses most of the major parts of the story, but extrapolates upon the story quite a bit. Another one with which I was not too pleased by the ending.Sometimes They Come Back – Well written story about a man who is having recurring nightmares involving the childhood murder of his brother. When the teenage murderers begin appearing in his class 16 years later, he knows that something unnatural is afoot and takes it upon himself to find out how to stop it.Strawberry Spring – Best story in the book so far, although a bit predictable. I can’t really say why I enjoyed the story so much, it just seems to flow well. Told in first person, it is an account of a series of murders that take place on campus during the time that the protagonist is in college. I loved the ending of this one.The Ledge – The Ledge is another solid offering. A tennis pro caught cheating with a millionaire’s wife accepts a wager to walk the 5 inch ledge around the 40th floor. Good build up of tension through-out and another nice ending.The Lawnmower Man – After a string of excellent stories, this one is pretty weak. A man sells his lawnmower after a cat is accidentally run over by the kid he hires to mow his lawn. The following summer, he procrastinates hiring a service to do the mowing and the lawn grows out of control. When he finally hires a service, he gets a strange and dangerous surprise. Very odd and not really fitting in with most of the book so far, this story seems very random and I just couldn’t get into it.Quitters, Inc. – Back to another excellent story. A man decides to follow a friend’s advice and quit smoking. The company that he goes to for help uses some rather unorthodox methods. I found this one to be very entertaining. The story moves well and keeps the reader in high gear.I Know What You Need – This one was a fairly dull stinker. A guy uses his psychic/voodoo powers to charm and win a girl. It just didn’t seem to go anywhere and I was bored.Children of the Corn – One of the longer stories in the book. A couple traveling through Nebraska has an accident and proceeds to the next town to take care of things. The town is mostly deserted and all that is left is a cult of psychotic children. It’s an excellent story and really creepy. This is another of my favorites in the book.The Last Rung on the Ladder – This is another good one. This is a touching, sad story about an event that happens to a boy and his sister and where it has left them today.The Man Who Loved Flowers – This story is not as good as some of the rest, but still enjoyable. This is a story about young love in the spring-time…or is it?One for the Road – This was a fun one for a Stephen King fan. Winter in Maine and a terrible storm has blown in. Two men at a bar are surprised when a well dressed and frozen man bursts in. It seems that his car has been lodged in a snow drift a few miles down the road at the exit to Jerusalem’s Lot. His wife and daughter are waiting in the car for him to bring help…or are they?? Help or something else may have come for them already.The Woman in the Room – Boy, what a downer to end the book on. It’s a well written story, but very depressing. The story is about a man whose mother is dying from cancer. It mainly centers around his feelings about whether or not she would be better off dead and whether or not he should help her to end it.
  • (4/5)
    Night Shift is a collection of short stories by Stephen King first published in 1978. I will be the first to admit that I am a bigger fan of the King tomes and normally do not love his short fiction. Night Shift, however, is the exception. A few standouts that I would recommend: The Ledge, Quitter Inc., Children of the Corn and I Know What You Need. The rest of the stories are pretty good and vary in levels of believability from "very real" to "complete absurdity". If you are going to pass by any of the stops along the Night Shift train I would personally skip The Man Who Loved Flowers. Other than that, this is Stephen King gold.Night Shift is a great collection to pick up if you are in the mood to be scared, just a bit, one story at a time.
  • (3/5)
    Great collection of a variety of Stephen King's short stories--really shows the breadth of his work. I was very surprised how much he was influenced by H.P. Lovecraft, as evidenced by "Jerusalem's Lot."
  • (4/5)
    I've often told people that Stephen King impresses me as a writer not so much for his novels as his less known novellas and short stories. Night Shift, published in 1978, is his first anthology of shorts, comprising 20 works published from 1970 to 1977. Nine of them were adapted into feature or television films: "Graveyard Shift," "The Mangler," "Battleground," "Trucks," "Sometimes They Come Back," "The Ledge," "The Lawnmower Man," "Quitters Inc," and "Children of the Corn." I found even the introduction by John D. MacDonald and forward by King of interest. King's forward talks of the horror genre and what draws him to it. MacDonald was a fine writer of hard-boiled detective fiction that included the Travis McGee series. In the introduction he talks about the art of fiction and defines a good story as "something happening to someone you have been led to care about...without authorial intrusion" and this, he claims, is what King excels at. Almost all of the stories were an entertaining read (I felt only "The Man Who Loved Flowers" was really weak), often featuring killer last lines, but some stories stood out to me among the rest. The first story, the longest in the book at around 12,000 words, "Jerusalem's Lot" a tale set in 1850 is unique in the volume for its Lovecraftian tone; told in letters and diary entries, it ends on an ironic half-humorous, half-ominous note in the present bringing it full circle. "The Boogeyman" is remarkable for Billings, the unreliable narrator and the way he unconsciously reveals himself, although I felt the ending weakened it. "Battleground" with its toy army is a gem, and the last line made me grin madly. "Sometimes They Come Back," one of the longer stories, I count the scariest; "The Ledge" I found the most suspenseful. "Quitters, Inc" featured black humor and another of those killer last lines. "I Know What You Need" resonated with me--maybe because it's the one story with a female protagonist. "The Last Rung of the Ladder" is the most moving, the most wrenching. "One for the Road" is a spooky vampire tale, a kind of sequel to Salem's Lot. And the final story, "The Woman in the Room" is also the saddest, one whose horror, like "Ladder" comes from the everyday without a hint of the supernatural; it's the most literary tale in the collection, written in present tense, and a fitting closer.Even if you don't like short stories, if you like the horror genre at all, this is a must-read.
  • (4/5)
    I think this was the first collection of Stephen King short stories I bought and I remember reading it alone in the old house in Durban North one overcast and stormy holiday in 1983: the story Trucks was a stand-out to me and I loved Jerusalem's Lot, but then I do love the letter-format. Being alone in that gloomy house with long shadows and rain would have added to the chill of the tales.
  • (4/5)
    This was my first foray into King's short stories and I must say I'm now hooked. His short stories are just as awesome as his 1000 page epic novels. Even with such a little space to work with he's still able to create characters that you care about and situations that you can't walk away from. My favorite in the book was probably The Ledge due to it's simple yet horrific plot. Read this and you'll want to pick up his other short story collections.
  • (5/5)
    IMHO Kings' best Short Story Collection. This Book really was scary when I first read it a s a teenager. And it still was when I re-read it in english years later.
  • (5/5)
    One of the best books I have ever read.
  • (2/5)
    Great collection of stories by the master of horror
  • (5/5)
    I think this is some of the best of King - old classic stories. Someone should really tell the film makers that stories like "The Lawnmower Man" are best left in print form, however. Most of them are a little too short to transfer well into a feature film (the possible exception being "Children of the Corn" which had a lot of possibilities left open). Sixteen out of the 20 here are very memorable. A good proportion for a short story collection.
  • (5/5)
    This is a great collection of short stories and includes some of King's scariest tales. Many will be familiar with places and characters that popped up in many popular King movies notably One for the Road which is a sequel of sorts to Salem's Lot and is as scary as that tale. Jerusalem's Lot which is a sort of prequel to Salem's Lot. Children of the Corn and Sometimes They Come Back, just to name a few. Not a spectacular work by Mr. King, but still a very enjoyably book. Fans of King will be interested to read his different works. Movie fans will note that many of these stories were the basis of films
  • (4/5)
    Stephen King's first short story collection Night Shift is pretty solid. Overall, it's not as good a collection as Skeleton Crew, but there are some real classics here.For my money Graveyard Shift, I Am the Doorway, Gray Matter, Children of the Corn, The Last Rung on the Ladder and One for the Road (a cool, spooky sort of an epilogue to 'Salem's Lot) are King at the top of his game.The rest of the stories don't quite approach that level, but all have something interesting about them. There are some that I wish were better, but I didn't think there was a clinker in the bunch.In a couple of stories, you can see King working out some early ideas for what would become classic novels. The first is Jerusalem's Lot a fun Lovecraftian tale about a family curse, a deserted village and the old gods. King is a monumentally better writer than Lovecraft ever was. Even his purposely-purple-prose seems less of an affectation than Lovecraft's usually is.The other, Night Surf is a sort of alternate take on Captain Trips and The Stand. A neat idea, but I wasn't wild about the story itself.There were a couple of horror/comedy stories (The Lawnmower Man and Quitters, Inc.) that were handled very well. They reminded me of the sort of stuff that Bentley Little does so well.Worth a read, definitely. For any other writer, this would be a top tier collection, but King is King for a reason and has done better collections since this one.
  • (5/5)
    One of the best collections of King's short fiction. Skeleton Crew is marginally better, but this is excellent. He reminds me a bit of Bradbury in the way that he can come up with many different scenarios and each still has a major punch.
  • (4/5)
    Ahhh, the night shift. Nothing like the quietness of it. In King's "Night Shift" we have 20 shorts. The well known "Jerusalem's Lot (later shortened to Salem's Lot), Graveyard Shift (sweet), "Trucks", "The Lawnmower Man", "Children of the Corn"--we all have heard of these, and for good reason. It's been a while since I read this, and much has blurred. One story that sticks out in my mind is "Sometimes They Come Back". Bullies die hard...