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The Royal Wulff Murders

The Royal Wulff Murders

Geschrieben von Keith McCafferty

Erzählt von Rick Holmes


The Royal Wulff Murders

Geschrieben von Keith McCafferty

Erzählt von Rick Holmes

Bewertungen:
3/5 (7 Bewertungen)
Länge:
10 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Jan 1, 2012
ISBN:
9781464008276
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

An award-winning editor for Field & Stream magazine, Keith McCafferty presents his debut novel, The Royal Wulff Murders. A local fisherman lands more than he bargained for when he pulls a dead body out of Montana’s Madison River. Sheriff Martha Ettinger takes on the case and soon comes into the company of reclusive artist, Montana newcomer, and ex-PI Sean Stranahan. After teaming up to investigate, Martha and Sean soon uncover evidence that the murder has ties to one of the state’s biggest industries: fly fishing.
Freigegeben:
Jan 1, 2012
ISBN:
9781464008276
Format:
Hörbuch


Über den Autor

Keith McCafferty is the longtime survival and outdoor skills editor of Field & Stream magazine and an award-winning journalist. He lives in Bozeman, Montana.

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3.0
7 Bewertungen / 4 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (2/5)
    Fishing, fly or in any other variety, is not my thing at all. Heck, I hardly even eat fish, mostly only under duress. I am perfectly happy to let them keep doing their thing. Nor do I have any desire to ever go fishing myself. Mysteries aren't my preferred reading either. But I try to be somewhat open-minded about my reading choices, so when the lure of a fly fishing mystery was dropped in front of me, I bit.

    Should I have? Maybe not. The opening parts were definitely hard on me. There was so much fishing, like back-to-back fishing. This probably would have been okay if there had been some interesting conversations accompanying the fishing, but a lot of it was just someone out fishing with lots of details of fish and lures and bait and whatever. So not my thing.

    Thankfully, things picked up when the sheriff got more page time. I liked her; she's a sassy woman kicking butt in a traditionally masculine profession. Plus, she doesn't fish, which meant that that did not happen much when she was around.

    On the contrary, I did not like Velvet at all. The stage name is ridiculous, but her real name, Vareda Beaudreux, is no better. Really though, that's not the issue, because that would be absurd and unfair. Velvet/Vareda is one of those women that men all of over the world seem to obsess over: beautiful, tortured, mysterious. A completely different writer, John Green, has written two books about girls like this. What is the fascination, guys? I'd like to know because I so do not get it. Throw the crazy ones back!

    Basically, I'm not an ideal judge of this book. However, I do think that as mysteries go, it's a pretty good one. Anyone who loves to fish and to read mysteries should not miss this.
  • (4/5)
    Royal Wulff Murders, The Keith McCafferty 4 STARSThe only complaints that I have for this story is swearing and too much about fly fishing for me. The Mystery was well written and kept me guessing who and why for the murder.I like the range of characters, Also it left open for possible future stories.Rainbow Sam a fishing guide was in a boat with a client fly fishing, when the client finally caught something. A dead body.Sean Stranahan is new to Montana. He is now a painter but he was a private detective when he was younger. To get in the cheaper office he had to put on it on the door under artist. He had a walk in client that wanted to pay him to fly fish looking for fish that her father had caught than marked so she can find the area her father wrote about and leave his ashes their. Also look for her brother that was fishing to find it also.Sean is living in his office so he can save money till he sells some paintings. He just got divorced and moved from Vermont.Sheriff Martha Ettinger thinks their is something wrong with the young man who died in the river. No one seemed to know who he was. No wallet or car was found.I liked listening to this mystery on my kindle and would love to read more from Keith in the future.I was given this ebook to read in exchange of honest review from Netgalley.02/16/2012 PUB Penguin Group, USA Viking Imprint
  • (3/5)
    Solid first attempt from new author Keith McCafferty. Compelling characters with a few interesting twists. Sean Stranahan has left the east coast to start life over in Montana fishing. When the body of a young male is found murdered with a Royal Wulff fly inserted through his lip, the game is on involving a cast of characters including Vareda Beaudreaux, sultry sex pot and Sheriff Martha Ettinger.
  • (4/5)
    The “Holy Grail” of trout rivers in Montana is the Madison River. It is here that a fishing guide reels in quite a catch. A dead body with a Royal Wulff trout fly through his lower lip and a stick in his eye. Obviously an easily explained drowning. Not so fast, Sheriff Martha Ettinger thinks there is more to the story. While questioning other fishermen she meets Sean Stranahan, a former private detective, painter and fly fisherman would has moved to Montana to escape his life back East and pursue his passion of painting.Stranahan is still representing himself as a P.I. because his landlord likes to have the tenants represent a variety of occupations. He is totally surprised when Velvet Lafayette shows up at his door to hire him to find her missing brother. Are these cases related? Will Sean and Martha need to team up to find their answers? Just what is happening in and around Bridger, Montana? It is definitely more than meets the fly!Dollycas’s ThoughtsYou do not have to fish to enjoy this well written mystery. The first novel by Field & Stream Magazine Editor McCafferty is a very well crafted and complex whodunit. His love of nature shines as brightly as the sun through his detailed descriptions of everything from landscapes to ponds to fish and birds. Big Sky Country leaps right off the pages.His characters are also well developed and so sharp that you clearly picture them in their waders casting out to reel in a great big trout or belting out a song or tracking down clues to catch a killer. My grandfather was quite a fisherman and somehow I could see him out there in that beautiful setting casting time and time again with a huge smile on his face. He would have loved this scenic locale.The story has ebbs and flows, ripples and rapids, channels and cascades, unveiled at a pace to be savored not hurried, although by the last few chapters I was devouring the pages at a pretty rapid pace. There are a few red herrings swimming with all those trout.If you are a nature lover who likes a fine mystery you will really enjoy this book.