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Awaken

Awaken

Geschrieben von Meg Cabot

Erzählt von Natalia Payne


Awaken

Geschrieben von Meg Cabot

Erzählt von Natalia Payne

Bewertungen:
4/5 (11 Bewertungen)
Länge:
11 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Jul 2, 2013
ISBN:
9781470370305
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

With Awaken, #1 New York Times bestselling author Meg Cabot brings her reimagining of the Persephone myth to a thrilling conclusion. Pierce Oliviera doesn't regret her decision to accept John Hayden and live in the Underworld. But then John revives a human soul, disrupting the balance between life and death--and to restore the balance, someone must die.
Freigegeben:
Jul 2, 2013
ISBN:
9781470370305
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

Meg Cabot’s many books for both adults and tweens/teens have included multiple global and #1 New York Times bestsellers, selling over twenty-five million copies worldwide. Her Princess Diaries series has been published in more than 38 countries and was made into several hit films by Disney. Meg is still waiting for her real parents, the king and queen, to restore her to her rightful throne. She currently lives in Key West, FL, with her husband and various cats.


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3.8
11 Bewertungen / 16 Rezensionen
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  • (3/5)
    Why did I read Awaken?
    I loved the first book in the series, Abandon but didn't quite have love for Underworld. With that said I had hope that maybe just maybe I would find some love for Awaken. I also love Meg Cabot and knew that even if I didn't totally love Awaken I would probably still enjoy myself because Cabot is just so good at making things funny.

    How was the plot?
    Overall, I thought the plot was just kind of silly. The whole purpose is to restore balance to the Underworld and there are some random twists thrown in along with a showdown against Pierce's crazy grandma. I don't feel like much was ever really explained concerning the fates and the furies which disappointed me.

    Despite the plot not being anything special I found myself wanting to keep reading because Cabot is so good at ending chapters. She has this gift where she knows right where to end a chapter so that the reader can't help but keep reading. Almost every chapter ends at the most suspenseful part of the chapter.

    What was so funny?
    There are all of these situations that should be serious and just aren't, thank goodness. That is seriously what I love about Meg Cabot's books. I know going into it that I will laugh at least once out loud. The moment that stands out for me from this book took place when the Police Officer is questioning Pierce and the gang and they are being totally honest with him about the Underworld and everything else and you can just imagine how nuts the Police Officer thinks they are. The whole interaction and his reaction just cracked me up.

    Is this a satisfying conclusion to the Abandon trilogy?
    Overall, I didn't love this trilogy so I didn't really have super high expectations for this book. I think it was satisfying enough.
  • (4/5)
    Awaken was a great conclusion to the Abandon series. Pierce struggles with the realization that she is leaving her old world behind in order to be the death deity's consort, and her friends are trying to make sense of this new world they have discovered. They also make friends with some newly deceased, and together they fight against the furies and pool their efforts into defeating the furies, as well as a newly discovered foe (for the time being). In the end everything gets resolved quite nicely - they figure out how to contain the furies, Pierce's parents reconcile and are informed of the Underworld, Alex finds his place in the world, and Pierce is all set to rule with John and make the Underworld a better place.
  • (5/5)
    great ending to a unique and captivating twist of persephone and hades' myth
  • (4/5)
    Earlier in this Persephone/Hades myth based trilogy, John (Hades) and Peirce (Persephone) made a decision that has imbalanced the forces ruling the underworld. Having finally (mostly) worked out their relationship, Peirce is suddenly faced with the possibility of losing John because of this imbalance. As she tries to rescue him and restore balance to the underworld, she’ll have to take advantage of all the connections and cool powers that come with being the queen of the underworld. And it will be awesome.

    Initially, I had some trouble getting back into this series. There are some vague references to the previous books, but nothing specific enough to be helpful. At first my disorientation made Peirce and John come across as melodramatic about everything from their relationship to the danger to the underworld. As I got into the story, however, I started to remember everything I loved about the first two books. Peirce is by far one of my favorite Meg Cabot heroines (and they’re all pretty awesome). She’s sarcastic, she’s funny, and she’s a very strong character. And I mean a really strong character. Not one of those characters everyone describes as strong but who is always rescued. She’s a strong heroine who actually rescues her boyfriend at least as often as he rescues her.

    I also liked that this book included some enjoyable secondary character development, including the addition of some less well known Greek mythology. It’s nice to see a large number of characters have depth and character growth, instead of just being foils for the protagonist. Like the previous books, once things got started, something was constantly happening. The fast pace was a lot of fun and I appreciated that there were several interesting issues the protagonist had to deal with. Not that awesome fights with furies aren’t enough, but the secondary plot involving her introducing John to her family really fleshed out the story for me. In addition to preserving the things I enjoyed about the previous books, this attention to all aspects of Peirce’s life made this book a great conclusion to the trilogy.

    This review first published on Doing Dewey.
  • (2/5)
    Cabot finishes this trilogy well and all the good people are safe, but there were parts that dragged quite a bit. The author can be very amusing and this retelling of Persephone in the Underworld is interesting. There are many quotes from Dante and the clash between the ancient mythology and Christian theology is avoided in general, but there is one character that goes on about Jesus is her Lord and is she out of place!
  • (5/5)
    I cannot believe I read this entire series in less than a week, and not only did I read it, but I fell in love with it. I am sad to no longer be able to get to see the characters, who felt like old friends by the time I fnished reading.

    Meg Cabot has done an amazing job of retelling this bit of mythology and bringing to life the story of Hades and Persephone in a way that I don't think anyone else could have done. Often, recreations of historical or mythological situations are done poorly or just do not hold my interest, but this story just sucked me in in a way I don't think anyone else could have.

    I love the way you could see the bits of of the story coming together, like I could almost see the wheels turning in the heads of each of the characters. And the conversation at the very end between Pierce and John left me absolutely breathless and speechless.

    I was pleased to see that the way the sex scene was laid out and described in book 2 was not repeated here. To me it was just a bit over the top and .. Well, cheesy really.

    I find that the more I love a book, the harder it is for me to find a lot to say about it without giving away spoilers. So I will leave with the following:

    This series is an absolute must read for anyone who has entertained an interest in mythology in any way.

    Thank you to the publisher for a copy for review.
  • (4/5)
    As a hurricane heads for Isla Huesos, the Underworld too experiences the Furies' upheaval: after an accident leaves John dead (again), it's up to Pierce to figure out how to ferry all the dead souls to their proper afterlife destination and, somehow, save John. With her cousin and best friend in tow, Pierce returns to the land of the living to defeat the forces of evil once and for all. "Awaken" was an entertaining end to the trilogy, filled with plenty of suspense and romance to keep me intrigued. If possible, I'd like to see their story continue in another series, if only to see the characters develop more.
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely loved this series. In this book, Pierce and John are separated and it just killed me. I just couldn't wait for their reunion. This was probably my favorite book out of the three. I'm a sucker for quirk humor with my paranormal. :) It was all I could do not to read ahead! Another brilliant read from Cabot.
  • (4/5)
    I accidentally read Underworld (Abandon #2) first, before reading Abandon, but luckily Meg Cabot makes it easy for readers to jump into the series without being totally lost on the plot. Funnily enough, I then somehow got confused and then read this book next, when I fully intended to read the first book. Sleep deprivation was really going against me this week...Awaken is the third book in the Abandon series and is the exciting, action-packed conclusion to this story inspired by the Persephone and Hades mythology. The atmosphere throughout is dark and dangerous as a hurricane sweeps through the mortal realm and things in the underworld have turned chaotic.The beginning of the novel opens with a shocking turn of events as John "dies." Common sense dictates that there's no way he's ACTUALLY dead and I don't think Pierce really actually believes he won't come back because her grief wasn't all that real to me. More than that, there's no way in hell (or the underworld haha) that Cabot would kill off her leading man in the beginning of the novel. So even though we know that John will come back, it was an interesting change in the pace of the book as we get to see Pierce become stronger, more independent, and her character development allows her to become really ready to take her place as Queen of the Underworld. She carries a whip as a weapon and leads a group of people into the mortal world to find and destroy Thanatos and to wage war on the Furies. Pierce is empowered, and these days, it's all about the strong female heroine. It was a good change of pace to see Pierce handle the chaos for once.That being said, Pierce is still very emotional (hey, she's 17, I don't hold it against her). Her emotions (specifically her temper) are pointed out by supporting characters as being dangerous to her overall mission to save John. While it's not expressed outright, her anger is her tragic flaw, which is a VERY ancient-Greek-story way to spin things. I loved this. If she can't control her anger, bad things will happen--and John will die.Having Thanatos as an important new character was an interesting choice. I'm all for using more mythology in YA books because whether teens know they're learning or not, the Greek myths are there for readers to take in and learn from. Thanatos was quickly defeated though and I was a bit put out by this. Minor Greek deity or not... he was basically defeated at the seduction of a 17-year-old girl. I don't know if I'm still too excited from reading House of Hades by Rick Riordan. Perhaps 500 pages from Riordan of his main characters roaming the underworld made me expect a bigger battle between Thanatos and Pierce, but oh well. Pierce has 99 other problems to take care of after Thanatos.The book is filled with obstacles and challenges--it's just one problem after another for Pierce to solve, but it keeps the action moving and keeps the reader on the edge of their seat. The book is suspenseful from the first few pages when we learn that things in the underworld are chaotic and out of whack, then John dies, then Thanatos throws a wrench into things, there's family issues, her parents hate John, the Furies, Alex is annoying, and so on.John is very protective and while I love when he's all macho and devoted to his girlfriend, sometimes it's too much. When Edward John refuses to let Bella Pierce do something/go somewhere that's even a little bit dangerous, I'm like: calm down, buddy. His demeanour sometimes is unhealthy when it comes to protecting Pierce, but I'm quicker to forgive this because Cabot makes it clear John isn't always logical because of his childhood and his history with his father. I'm always quicker to forgive if there's a legitimate psychological reason for his behaviour.This book is darker and has an exciting climax and conclusion to the book with an all-out battle between the Furies and Pierce/John. Pierce kicks ass and takes names--maybe even going a little bit overboard by choking her Fury-possessed grandmother and then shoving her Persephone Diamond into her. Whoa.Christianity also plays a large role in the plot (hello ancient pagan Greece...what religion happened to you again?). I loved this quote about why a Fury was able to possess Grandma and why she was so easily corrupted into believing that John, a pagan death deity would have needed destroying:"As a religious woman...the discovery that there exists a world beyond ours that isn't the traditionally taught heaven and hell must have been deeply disturbing to her... and so that world would have needed destroying" (Cabot 304)Overall, Awaken is an epic conclusion to an exciting teen paranormal romance series. It's thrilling, dark, and full of danger--and sexy men from Greek mythology. It's good versus evil on an grander and mythological scale. It's sex, drugs and death deities.It's a great teen/paranormal romance series and you should read it.
  • (4/5)
    *Many thanks to Point and NetGalley for allowing early access to this title*

    Quick Review...for when I don't have a lot to say...

    I've been a fan of this series from the beginning. I loved Pierce's sassiness and John's earnest love. I loved them together and I even liked them apart. Together is better, of course, but this was a case where they didn't annoy me when they weren't together.

    The final book in the series was exactly what I needed to finish it up. Full of action, mortal peril, plenty of snark, sweet loveyness, and some fun new characters. I don't always approve of adding new characters to the last book, but in this case, they work. They help advance the story instead of feeling like they're just there as an afterthought or a nod to old Aunt Martha who was once promised a character named after her.

    There were times in this book when I wasn't sure if things were actually going to work out. I mean, I knew deep down that they would, because hello, who wants a sad ending to their love story?! I just wasn't sure how on earth it was going to work out. I was pleased with the resolution and how it all turned out.
    Overall, a great series and one that I'll come back to. I do love my mythology!

    4 Eiffel Towers



    Content Advisory:
    Language: Moderate
    Sexuality: Moderate
    Violence: Moderately Heavy
  • (4/5)
    What's really remarkable about this book is that I didn't need to have read the first two in the trilogy to understand anything. Granted, having a bit of knowledge about the Persephone myth helped, but enough information was given contextually to allow the reader to come into the piece in medias res. I almost always love Meg Cabot books, and this was no exception. I like the mini-trend of Greek myth retellings. There were two very concrete settings, and a host of individualized characters. If my library budget allows, I'll be ordering this (assuming it's not already on Automatically Yours).
  • (4/5)
    This was the best novel of the series - much more consistent and the story was interesting. I liked the way Ms. Cabot dealt with Pierce's relationships with both her parents and the Underworld.
  • (3/5)
    This was definitely the best book in the series. It wrapped up all the lose ends nicely, had a decent ending, and Pierce wasn't *quite* as annoying by the end of it as she was during the other two. It's definitely not my favorite series--the heroine drives me crazy; give me Suze instead any day--but my daughter likes it, as do several of my studentsI received an ARC via NetGalley in exchange for an honest opinion.
  • (4/5)
    The Good Stuff Fabulous ending to the series, it worked. I was a little disappointed with book two, but this restored my faith in Cabot Lots more humour than in the first two which made me really happy Love the secondary characters Sexuality was dealt with very tastefully Love that it deals with Greek Mythology - especially the Persephone myth More quotes from Dante's Inferno Fast paced John has developed nicely, not so much of the stalkerish controlling John from Abandon Great cover (Yes I know you shouldn't judge a book by a cover - but if the cover isn't fabulous, I usually overlook it) Pierce is finally growing a set (thank goodness!) Dialogue is delightful as always Many issues wrapped up but still leaves it open to further develop story God I loved the scene with John and Pierce's parents -- made me snort with laughterThe Not so Good Stuff It's been so long since I read the second book, I had a hard time remembering what happened and who everyone was Many of the adults are useless (I know I know I should let it go) or uncaring A wee bit repetitive but not as noticeable as in book 1 and 2Favorite Quotes/Passages"It's especially upsetting because, in a lot of ways, my family has turned out to be like the seawall Isla Huesto's community leaders built in order to protect its low-lying areas from flooding: They're not very reliable. Some of them, in fact, have turned out to be made from inferior material. They crumbled and broke apart instead of doing what they were supposed to do: keep their loved ones from drowning.""He opened his lips beneath mine, let out a faint moaning sound, and lifted his hands to grip my waist, which just showed that all boys - even ones possessed by Greek personifications of death - could be shockingly stupid sometimes.""If enough people go out of their way to help someone else, the spirit of kindness eventually breaks through the darkness, the way sunshine breaks through clouds after a storm and allows even more kind acts to follow."4 Dewey'sI received this from Scholastic in exchange for an honest review
  • (4/5)
    Like the other novels in this series, Awaken had a rocky start and a strong finish. I really enjoyed the character development, but the plot is not nearly as strong. Some of the plot twists seem pointless and even random, but once we move past that it’s an enjoyable story (especially for mythology fans).The characters are still likable and I really enjoyed Pierce and John’s story. John is probably my favorite character in the novel. He is the most consistent character (Pierce flip flops in her opinions quite a bit), as well as the most intelligent. I was happy to see more of Pierce’s father in Awaken as well. He is pretty much villainized in the previous novels, but he’s really not a bad guy. The plot, however, is what really causes me to scratch my head sometimes. I won’t get into details, as I don’t want to spoil the story, but there is an unexpected plot twist in the beginning of the story. Is it a good plot twist? No. Did it make the story more exciting? No. After that plot point is resolved, however, the story picks up pace and becomes enjoyable once more. The resolution was actually pretty interesting and I really enjoyed the story from that point forward, but I don’t really understand why it was there to begin with. As a side note, the way Pierce put the pieces together were silly and nonsensical as usual.Awaken is a fairly strong conclusion to the Abandon trilogy. The series as a whole has it’s ups and downs, and Awaken was no exception. Those who have read the first two novels will find a satisfactory ending to the story. All major plot point have been resolved and we aren’t left with any burning questions.
  • (5/5)
    This is the third book in a trilogy. If you haven’t read the first two books this may contain some spoilers.*This review is from an uncorrected galley I received from NetGalley*5 StarsPierce Oliviera has accepted the fact that she must reside in the Underworld to be with the one she loves but “happily ever after” seems impossible. The threat of the furies she’s already faced becomes even more dangerous since John breaks an important rule by reviving the soul of someone she cares about. His action causes the imbalance of life and death that brings both of her worlds into chaos and someone will have to die to fix it.The end of a series is always bittersweet and this is definitely my favorite of the series. If you take away all the supernatural elements of Pierce and John’s story there is a very realistic feel to it all. Their relationship is dysfunctional and tortured like so many real life relationships. The lesson is that relationships take work and compromise. At least that’s what I get out of it anyway. The family unit is also relatable in its imperfections. The pacing is perfect and there’s quite a bit of action to keep everything flowing smoothly. Obviously I have no complaints and recommend the whole trilogy.