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Beneath the Bleeding

Beneath the Bleeding

Geschrieben von Val McDermid

Erzählt von Gerard Doyle


Beneath the Bleeding

Geschrieben von Val McDermid

Erzählt von Gerard Doyle

Bewertungen:
4/5 (19 Bewertungen)
Länge:
14 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Jan 1, 2010
ISBN:
9781440790881
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

Winner of the Gold Dagger Award and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, Val McDermid pens mysteries heralded on both sides of the Atlantic. In Beneath the Bleeding, Dr. Tony Hill must make sense of the perplexing death of a soccer star—but the footballer’s demise is only a prelude to greater violence.

“McDermid is as smooth a practitioner of crime fiction as anyone out there.” —New York Times Book Review
Freigegeben:
Jan 1, 2010
ISBN:
9781440790881
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

VAL McDERMID is the internationally bestselling author of more than twenty crime novels. She has won the CWA Gold Dagger Award for Best Crime Novel of the Year and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; her novels have been selected as New York Times Notable Books and have been Edgar Award finalists. She was the 2010 recipient of the CWA Cartier Diamond Dagger for Outstanding Achievement in the Field of Crime Writing. More than 10 million copies of her books have been sold around the world. She lives in the north of England. Visit her website at www.valmcdermid.com.


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4.2
19 Bewertungen / 18 Rezensionen
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  • (5/5)
    I haven't read nearly enough Val McDermid books. This is only the second one of the Dr. Tony Hill and Carol Jordan series and she has a number of other series out. I have seen the TV series made from these books though it was long enough ago that I did not remember any of the plot details. I must try to find others because I was absolutely caught up in the mystery.Dr. Tony Hill is in hospital for most of the book. One of the inmates at the mental institution where he works got loose, got his hands on a fire axe and took a swing at Tony's knee (I'm wincing even as I write this because it sounds so painful.) DCI Carol Jordan, Tony's tenant, friend and colleague, didn't find out about it until she got into work on Monday, a few days later. She immediately goes to see him and has to bypass a large number of football fans who are outside the hospital because the star of the local football team is very ill. Soon Carol and Tony will learn that the player has been poisoned by ricin and there is a murder to be investigated. Even from his hospital bed Tony provides valuable clues although Carol doesn't always heed them. When a bomb explodes in the stadium while a game is on it looks like there is also a terrorist threat. One of the uninjured who helps rescue people from the wreckage is a former police officer. Then he collapses and the same doctor that recognized the ricin poisoning realizes that he has also been poisoned. With multiple poisonings on hand, not to mention the thirty-five dead in the bomb blast, life is hectic for Carol and her team. Sometimes no-one can follow up on Tony's hunches and he has to get out of the hospital and check for himself. Ouch again! At almost 500 pages this is no lightweight book but it was tremendously satisfying.
  • (4/5)
    Another outing for Tony Hill & Carol Jordan - gripping read entwining 2 investigations - the hunt for a serial poisoner and the other for what at first appears to be a terrorist but is not as it seems.
  • (4/5)
    What are the odds? I checked out seven books last week. Two of the mysteries had the same problem (human trafficking), and this book has the same poison used in one of the cozies.On the other hand, Beneath the Bleeding is nothing like the cozy. Our heroine, DCI Carol Jordan, and our hero, psychologist and criminal profiler Dr. Tony Hill, are faced with two murder mysteries. One of the mysteries involves poison and the other is a mass murder that sees DCI Jordan and her team shunted aside by some arrogant government men in black who have had all the manners trained out of them. One of them isn't a complete jerk, but I agreed with the author's assessment of what their heavy-handed methods were likely to induce in those unfortunate enough to encounter them. A conversation about the effect a British TV show called 'Spooks' might have on viewers regarding the actions of real life intelligence agents was quite interesting.The book opens with the scene that leads to Dr. Hill being in the hospital. There he is dismayed to be visited by his mother, Vanessa, a cold businesswoman who has two reasons to be at his bedside, neither of which is to help him. Carol Jordan is a much more welcome visitor, but she's not buying Dr. Hill's theories, perhaps because she's so angry about the way the men in black are treating her and her team. Still, Tony manages to get around her lack of cooperation and she does save him from his mother more than once.The misdirection going on is considerably more than adequate. I also appreciated what we got to see of the mass murderer's thoughts before he joined that despicable 'club'. I wonder if he would have done it had he known how overly optimistic he was about the effect his deed would have on his family.Did I like this book? Another Dr. Hill mystery is already been requested from my library. By the way, 'Sufficient unto the day,' something Tony Hill is thinking late in the book, is short for 'Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof', which is from the King James translation of the Gospel of Matthew, chapter 6, verse 34. Also, I can't agree with the opening line of Beneath the Bleeding, because I read more than one article debunking it when I was a medical librarian.
  • (4/5)
    I loved this. It was like reading a very good, and long version of a CSI episode. A famous footballer falls dead in the hospital and it turns out to be poison. This leads the detectives and the profiler of the local UK police force on a merry chase as more dead bodies show up. I'll have to read more of these now.
  • (5/5)
    Great, great book. Two mysteries solved by Hill and Jordan. Poisonings and bomb explosion at soccer stadium.
  • (4/5)
    DCI Carol Jordan is barely holding it together, as she comes back to work on the police force and becomes involved in the investigation of the mysterious death of Brandford's most famous footballer. In a parallel case, we also follow someone who is planning a bombing.
    Tony, badly injured from an attack suffered at work, throws himself as much as he is able, back into work from his hospital bed. We also meet his truly ghastly mother, which gives an insight into Tony's childhood.
    Carol doesn't feel he's up to his best and they go through a testing time in their professional and personal relationship.
  • (3/5)
    Very readable even though the plot is implausible.
  • (5/5)
    Cracking plot, with many twists and turns which keeps you guessing.
  • (4/5)
    As with all Val McDermid books, I found Beneath the Bleeding to be a highly compulsive read. This is her fifth outing featuring Criminal Profiler Tony Hill and Police Inspector Carol Jordan, and the series still holds my attention with her fresh and inventive plotlines. In this outing Carol Jordan’s team is called out to investigate the bizarre death of a famous footballer, while Tony languishes in hospital recovering from a brush with an axe wielding mental patient attempting an escape. Of course the story escalates with more strange poisonings and the bombing of a football stadium. Are these crimes connected, is it terrorism or is it something else? These are all questions that Carol, Tony and the MCI team must answer.Val McDermid is an accomplished psychological thriller writer and from the explosive opening pages she draws the reader into her story and delivers a compelling story. Her characters are believable and complex, and in this book she introduces Tony Hill’s mother-from-hell which helps to fill in a lot of Tony’s background. Beneath the Bleeding is a good, solid addition to this series and I look forward to getting my hands on the next book.
  • (2/5)
    I've come to think that anything by Val McDermid has to be good. This one's excellent
  • (3/5)
    BENEATH THE BLEEDING is the fifth book in the Tony Hill / Carol Jordan series from Scottish writer Val McDermid. Which fans of this writer will already know. Fans will also know that anybody as daft as me, who would leave this book on the review pile for as long as I have, is really missing out on a very good thing.Now there are plenty of serial or multiple killer books floating around out there, and many readers are well over the whole idea, but you do have to give a moment's thought to revising that attitude when the writer is as talented and assured as McDermid. BENEATH THE BLEEDING grabs the reader from the opening scenes - when a star footballer is admitted to hospital, dying slowly with nobody able to identify the cause. And therein lies the whole pattern of this book - nothing is obvious, nothing is initially as it seems, nobody is quite what they are stacked up to be. Nothing makes sense. Not the series of poisonings, using very obscure toxins. Not the bomb exploding in a football stadium being obviously a terrorist attack. Not the friendship / ongoing dance between Tony and Carol. Not the relationship between Tony and his mother.There are some serious complications in Carol's investigation of these poisonings. Firstly Tony's laid up in hospital - his leg badly broken by a psychiatric patient off his medication and out of control. Tony's insight in investigations has progressed to the point where you might call it "profiling" but it's much more than that. It's all about thinking his way into the killer's head - giving Carol and her team insights into why / how or what the killer might be doing / feeling / seeing / trying to achieve. It's harder to do that when you're laid up in a leg brace in a hospital bed, and you cannot see the reactions of people, can't direct the questioning. Add to that Tony's frustrated by his infirmity and confused by his mother's presence at his bedside. The terrorist bombing adds its own complications bringing the specialist squad to town - not only do they take over the bombing investigation, they do their darned best to bully boy, huff, puff and generally stuff it up into the bargain. And they don't accept input from Carol's team - who are a crack squad in their own right, and they know their own patch very very well. I hadn't read a Tony Hill / Carol Jordan book for a while - I think what little of the TV series I watched put me off a little. The Tony Hill of the books is a complicated, tricky individual - very much a "physician heal thyself" sort of a character. Jordan's equally complicated, prickly, determined. It's very easy to see how a friendship has developed between these two characters, and how the ever-present potential romance is almost threatening - rather than something comforting that they should be working towards. Ultimately, what comes out of BENEATH THE BLEEDING is a good, nicely twisty plot, a lot of tension and some seriously paced action. There's a good ensemble cast, although the concentration on the two main characters does mean that they disappear a little into the background. There's a good balancing of the personal and the professional, as well as the frustration and elation of difficult investigations and the pressures that Tony and Carol both feel - from others and from themselves.
  • (5/5)
    This book is one of a series of books by Val McDermid about the neurotic, socially inept but brilliant criminal profiler, Tony Hill, and assertive, maverick detective Carol Jordan, and the odd, dependent relationship that develops between them as they solve crimes together. This story (the fifth in the series), about a poisoned soccer star, stands on its own. But is also very interesting to read the series in order and watch as Carol and Tony's relationship develops. There is a good cast of supporting characters, all of whom are realistically multi-faceted.
  • (5/5)
    a 13 years old girl goes missing ina small, closed English village.Sstepfather is eventually convicted of rape and although no bod is ever found murdering her. A great finish to an intelligent mystery
  • (4/5)
    Another fine outing from Val McDermid. The main characters are well developed and there is a twist at the end that is surprising. One of the better mystery writers today!
  • (3/5)
    I put a hold on this at the library without realizing it was the most recent of a series I haven't read (Tony Hill); I just grabbed it. Although the book's cases themselves are not tied back to the previous books, the characters do make many references to past events, particularly past traumas. For what it's worth, I enjoyed "A Darker Domain" more.
  • (4/5)
    Good, taut, intelligent thriller. Part of the Dr. Tony Hill (specialist in profiling serial killers) series.
  • (5/5)
    In Bradfield Moor Secure Hospital profiler Tony Hill has got between an inmate and the fire-axe he is threatening staff with. The result is incredible damage to Tony's knee and now he is recuperating in Bradfield Hospital.Another patient in Bradfield Hospital is Bradfield Victoria's star midfielder, quickly dying from a poison for which there is no antidote. It is obvious he has been murdered but why?Then a terrorist bomb explodes at the Bradfield football stadium killing dozens. DCI Carole Jordan seethes as she is forced to hand over the bombing investigation to a specialist terrorist investigation team. Not that she doesn't have enough to keep her occupied. Tony Hill suspects that the bomber is no terrorist, and then one of their own dies from poisoning.I wrote a progress report some weeks back. Well, here I am 3 weeks later, and I must report that I have absolutely enjoyed this book. It has taken me at least 5 weeks to get it finished, even after resorting to driving slowly behind buses, sitting in the carpark waiting for a track to finish, and taking the long route home. I think part of my enjoyment has been the enforced speed of reading. You really can't race ahead or skim read when a story is being read to you. In fact sometimes you listen to the occasional track again just to make sure you got it right.Andrew Wincott in the long run did an excellent job of the reading. At first I reported that I thought his voice was too similar to that of Robson Green the TV actor who plays Tony Hill. But as the story progressed Wincott did an excellent job in voice differentiation.
  • (3/5)
    The long awaited 5th book in the Tony Hill/Carol Jordan series. Beneath the Bleeding was certainly interesting to read, but it didn't quite meet up to the standards of the previous books. Certainly the mystery of the murders was intriguing. You’ve got a local football celebrity who is poisoned with Ricin in the prime of his career and a man who’s planning on bombing the football stadium for unknown reasons. Amidst this wave of violent crime Tony’s laid up in the hospital after being caught in the knee by an axe wielding patient at the mental hospital he works at. All of this should keep the book in the realm of page turner, but for some reason it just didn’t grab me the way the previous four books did. For one, Tony and Carol's relationship seemed a bit off in this outing. Carol was frequently distant and angry with Tony, and Tony was often out of it from medications in the hospital. There was also the entrance of Tony’s rather harsh mother, Vanessa which was oddly one of the few things that bonded Tony and Carol in this story even though Vanessa was a bit transitory and underused. I did enjoy the fact that McDermid explored Carol’s MIT team a bit further than usual. It was nice to get into their heads, especially since the criminals in this book weren’t as twisted as usual. I would definitely recommend reading this book if you’re a fan of the series. I can only assume that this book will help build the next one. And the last few lines of the book were a bit more promising than usual for Tony and Carol’s odd relationship.