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Robinson Crusoe

Robinson Crusoe

Geschrieben von Daniel Defoe

Erzählt von Ron Keith


Robinson Crusoe

Geschrieben von Daniel Defoe

Erzählt von Ron Keith

Bewertungen:
4/5 (108 Bewertungen)
Länge:
13 Stunden
Freigegeben:
22. Apr. 2011
ISBN:
9781461810018
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

Robinson Crusoe, published in 1719, was Defoe’s first novel and survives as his best-known work. Loosely based on a true account of a Scottish sailor—Alexander Selkirk—it is a tale of one man’s fall from grace and progress to redemption. The account of Crusoe’s life, scratched out with rationed indigo ink on a dwindling supply of paper salvaged from the hull of a wrecked ship, speaks eloquently of the tenacity and ingenuity of the human spirit.
Freigegeben:
22. Apr. 2011
ISBN:
9781461810018
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als ebook verfügbareBook

Über den Autor

Daniel Defoe (c. 1660–1731) was an English merchant, author, and political pamphleteer best known for the classic adventure novel Robinson Crusoe.


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3.9
108 Bewertungen / 76 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (1/5)
    Tell me you’re a white man without telling me you’re a white man.

    That’s it. That’s my whole review. Ten thumbs down.
  • (4/5)
    The reading was excellently done, I just didn't care for the content of the book. It's a product of it's time, and at least to me, no longer relatable to this time.
  • (4/5)
    Very good voiceover. The story itself is a staple of its time. Robinson Crusoe is a very selfish character who clearly expresses an average Englishman at the time set. Quite educationally historical if you ask me. Definitely worth a listen.
  • (2/5)
    The audiobook was just fine, I didn't enjoy the overall tone and contents of the book but alas, what can you do.
  • (5/5)
    Being banished from civilization because of what it seemed to be a curse, Robinson tried to build everything again in a very distant little world, the island. His path to the freedom is described in this book in which Robinson tell us his completely accidented life.
    When you think that solitude is the worst enemy... think again. Maybe the island is not as uninhabited as it seems.
    Tales of land and sea danger. Reflections about the man being away of his civilization. Madness and sanity.
  • (4/5)
    I really love this novel; just read it for the third time and very much enjoyed reading it again.The tale of Robinson Crusoe, who needs to survive on an island after having been shipwrecked, is a story that is familiar to most of us. Defoe's story is gripping, imaginative, and shows a great sense for detail and description. The book is written from Crusoe's point of view and uses a simple type of language, which fits very well with the story.Though I am not a religious person myself and find Crusoe's religious thoughts a bit much at times, I guess this type of ideas about the omnipotence of God and the role of providence in our lives were common in the early 18th century, and I never found it too annoying. I think many modern readers will profit from considering his ideas. Though I do not necessarily feel we should give thanks to God for everything, I do think it is true that many people are very preoccupied with what they lack, in stead of being happy with the things they have. Crusoe teaches us that it is important to be happy with what we have, and to be grateful for those things, because our situation could easily have been worse.
  • (5/5)
    WHAT A GREAT BOOK! The basic gist of the story is a man (Robinson Crusoe) gets stranded on an island for 28 some odd years. First off, the thing I noticed was: "look at what you get when you don't listen to your elders!" (Robinson, being the prodigal son, defied his father and left for a life at sea. As it turns out, it almost gets him killed in his first trip! Then he settles down in S. America and gets rich, but still gets that nagging feeling of adventure. So, in the spirit of Bilbo Baggins, he go's on an adventure for his own reasons. Didn't turn out well, because he got shipwrecked. It really represents the internal battle of spirited adventure, and that of following a responsible path in life. One is secure, stable, and boring. The other is fun, wild, and, as it turns out, deadly. Crusoe makes the best out of his situation, taming the wild area the best he could. the actual physical story is compelling, but where this book separates itself is its ability to tape the feeling, struggles, and emotions we have in our daily lives, and apply them loosely to the over arching struggles of Crusoe. I don't really know how to explain it, it's just a profound book, and perhaps even more functional in its application to life for a teenager, whom is struggling with those questions in their lives more so than an adult. I will make my daughter read this book., no doubt about that.
  • (4/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    I love this classic tale. I pick it up occasionally and read it again; it always feels like I am meeting an old friend once more.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (5/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    One of the best young adult books ever written. Deserted islands and shipwrecks started with Dafoe.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (1/5)
    I don't remember reading this book, though it's obvious I have -- the spine is bent, and I'm the only one who's ever owned it. It obviously left no impression on me. It might be something I'd pick up in the future and try again.
  • (5/5)
    Robinson Crusoe, a suicidal businessman with sociopathic tendencies, obsessively tries to recreate society when he's shipwrecked. He grows increasingly paranoid; by the time he finally reunites with another human, he's murderously insane.
  • (2/5)
    Much talk to tell a story, gets boreing , sometimes temped to skip. Which I am loath to do as I figure something has to be interesting soon and then would miss only thing making the read worth while. But this guy is a suffer to read.
  • (2/5)
    This book is very very slow. It is classic, but the type of classic that is only for a few excited readers that are not afraid of a long winter evenings with reading about Robinson's struggling on the sunny (or rainy) island.. Good luck to all brave readers.
  • (3/5)
    Robinson Crusoe doesn't deserve classic status to my mind. The language and authorship seemed pedestrian. The most enjoyable passages were philosophical (his conversion to Christianity and Providence, for example) or concerning Friday and cannibals. These were outweighed by pages of narrative-choking detail about building fences and disposing of property, and the characters beside the protagonist are very thin.
  • (3/5)
    I do think this is a book worth reading at least once (thus the three stars), although it certainly is no favorite. One thing it isn't though, even though I've seen the novel categorized as such--it's not a tale that would appeal to children in language or content--at least not in unabridged, unbowlderized, unillustrated editions. The novel is a mix of the good, the bad and the very ugly.Good -- The introduction calls this book "the first English novel" and that alone is good reason for anyone interested in the form to read it. And for the most part, it's a very engaging read which surprised me in something so early in the form--it probably helped I read an edition that modernized the spelling and punctuation. Crusoe's first person voice pulled me in, and there's a lot of evocative detail that brings the story alive. The afterward in the edition I read speaks of one of the fascinations of the tale is "technique." Isolated on an island in the Caribbean, at first with nothing but one knife, a pipe and a bit of tobacco, Crusoe recapitulates the entire process of civilization. First salvaging tools and stores from his wrecked ship, then mastering everything from carpentry, basket-weaving and pottery to small scale animal husbandry and agriculture and more. Parts of this book makes for great action/adventure reading--truly suspenseful parts that play like a film in my mind, such as as the chapters dealing with quelling a mutiny. It's not overlong either, and I found it a quick read. Bad -- The narrative at times violates the rule "show, don't tell" and the style is almost too spare at times and too taken up with minutia. The book was once praised for it's piety but to modern ears, even to devout Christian ones, I think, would come across as unduly preachy in parts--and that very preachiness complicates what I find most problematical in the novel. (See, "Very Ugly" below.) And my goodness, Defoe uses the word "Providence" more often than Meyer's Twilight uses "sparkle." (That would be a lot.) The last three chapters of a few dozen pages is anticlimactic, tedious and pointless after all that came before. Very Ugly -- In a word: slavery. I really am willing to make allowances for the times--the novel was published in 1719--but it's an issue from the first that got increasingly more disturbing. Crusoe himself before being shipwrecked on that island had been captured by pirates and sold into slavery and endures in that condition for two years. He escapes with a fellow slave who helps him quite a lot--then Crusoe turns around and sells the boy into slavery. Crusoe's brought to Brazil where he becomes a slave owning planter. The very voyage that shipwrecked him was for the purpose of bringing slaves back to Brazil. And I could have set that aside... Except... Well, Crusoe has a spiritual reawakening on the island where he bewails his sins--and they turn out to be his "original sin" in disobeying his father by going out to sea--and not being religiously observant in matters such as the sabbath. Slavery is certainly not enumerated. And then there's Friday. "Man Friday" is a word for servant because of this novel. For two-thirds of the novel Crusoe is alone. He observes that "cannibals" come ashore periodically with victims, and decides that he'll rescue one, or even two or three to "make slaves" of them. He does exactly that, and especially in the chapters dealing with his turning a man he names Friday into a servant, teaching him to call Crusoe "master" and converting Friday into a Christian, I truly wished I could reach into the pages and throttle Crusoe.I found the treatment of the whole issue more maddening than in any book I can ever remember reading. Including Gone With the Wind by the way. Lots of people decry that book as racist and as an apologia for slavery. I love Gone With the Wind though, despite those problems and found it far easier to enjoy. I think part of what made it easier to tolerate is that Gone With the Wind was written and published after slavery was history and set in an era where there was great opposition to it that would lead to its abolition. Proponents of slavery at least were on the defensive. Reading Robinson Crusoe, it seems this was an era where no one had a clue slavery was wrong at all. Forgetting the Sabbath? Quel horror! Trafficking in fellow human beings? Situation normal. Never mind that the whole characterization of Friday was enough to set my teeth on edge. Although in a way I suppose all this is all the more reason to read the book. The mindset says volumes about how the slave trade was able to be established and endure so long. No moral brakes on the practice. At least if Defoe reflects his times faithfully.For what it's worth, a friend who is an academic in the field of literature tells me there had been objections and opposition to slavery from the outset--and that critics themselves are undecided whether to take Crusoe straight up or whether his views reflect the author's. Apparently Defore is well-known for writing unsavory and repulsive characters who wind up on top--as in Moll Flanders about a thief and prostitute. So maybe we're meant to want to throttle Crusoe. Just reinforces though--this isn't some sweet children's book.
  • (3/5)
    Classic novels sometimes have the occasional racist references and usually it doesn’t bother me too much. I take it with a grain of salt and try to remember that it was written during a different time period and reflects an earlier belief system. I still don’t like it, but there’s nothing we can do about it at this point and it’s usually a minor point in the book. This one was different though. There’s something disturbing about the way Robinson mentions slavery so casually. He joins a ship on the condition that he’ll get a cut of the profits made from the slaves they transport. He also escapes being enslaved on an island with a young boy, only to sell the boy into slavery once they are rescued. Robinson spends more than 20 years on an island by himself before interacting with another living soul, (it reminded me a lot of Cast Away, which I’m sure took huge inspiration from this novel). When he finally gains a companion, the infamous Friday, he decides to treat him as a slave instead of an equal. The first thing he teaches him is how to call him Master. He also decides to name him Friday instead of attempting to find out his actual name. He continuously refers to Friday as an ignorant savage, all the while saying how he loves him dearly. When he discovers that Friday's people don't live too far away, his first concern is that Friday will forget that he is his slave and try to return to them. It's unbelievably selfish. Yes, Friday loves him and feels indebted to him, but I felt like Robinson took advantage of this in a horrible way. Robinson’s devotion to God and regret for his past behavior seems to come and go with each mood. He swings from thanking God for providing food and shelter for him, to lamenting the fact that he could have been living on a huge slave plantation if his boat hadn’t been shipwrecked. All of that being said; there are some things I liked about the book. Robinson is forced to get very creative to survive on the island and it’s interesting to see how he creates a new home for himself. Also, his solitude makes him reflective and he makes some wonderful observations as he examines his life. In the end, I’m glad I read it, but I think Robinson is a self-centered jerkface. A few great lines: “That all the good things in the world are of no farther good to us than for our use. And that whatever we may heap up to give others we enjoy only as much as we can use and no more.” Robinson felt this strongly after he killed more than he could eat or collected more wood than he needed. He watched it rot away when he didn’t use it and realized that it was useless to hoard extra food, etc. because it just went to waste. "How frequently, in the course of our lives, the evil, which in itself we seek most to shun, and which, when we are fallen into is the most dreadful to us, is often times the very means or door of our deliverance, by which alone we can be raised again from the affliction we are fallen into." "Thus fear of danger is 10,000 times more terrifying than danger itself when apparent to the eyes. And we find the burden of anxiety greater by much than the evil which we were anxious about."
  • (3/5)
    Preview… Daniel Defoe’s “Robinson Crusoe” has had an inarguably enormous effect on the literature of today. Widely considered the first English novel, it recounts the “life and strange surprising adventures” of its protagonist, who is marooned on an unidentified South American island for 28 years before he is able to return to EuropeCrusoe lives in utter solitude for 25 years. Not a skilled tradesman, he must teach himself various crafts to aid in his comfort and basic survival. The simplest things take great amounts of time—our hero spends 42 days making a single shelf! Crusoe also spends a substantial amount of time reflecting on his plight in a spiritual manner. He alternately cries out to God for deliverance and praises his maker for sparing him death at sea.One day, Crusoe sees a human footprint on the shore of his beach. He agonizes over its possible implications, restricting his activity for nearly seven years in order to remain safe. Later, he is able to rescue the intended victim of cannibalistic feasting, a young man he names Friday. Friday pledges himself to a life of servitude under Crusoe and is made “civilized” by learning the English language and religion and undergoing modest dietary changes. Friday quickly becomes indispensable to Crusoe as a companion and fellow survivor. He helps Crusoe defend the island and secure resources. He also offers valuable company.How does social isolation affect the human psyche? How is religion a valuable coping mechanism? How does “Robinson Crusoe” espouse the protestant work ethic? Most interestingly, how does Crusoe finally escape, and how does he react upon his return to England after so many years alone on the island?Although I find the novel a bit tedious at times, no one can deny its literary and cultural import or help but wonder how she might react if cast into a similar condition.You may like this book if…you wonder how extreme isolation might affect the human mind; you like reading a character’s spiritual musings; you want to read the original survival novel; you just have to see what happens to Crusoe; you find cannibals to be interesting; you want to read a political/ moral portrait of the time; you want some pointers on making the best of a hopeless situation—just in case.You may not like this book if…you expect the plot to follow the traditional story arc that is prominent in literature today; you are distracted by archaic grammar and spellings (viz., perswasion, prophetick); you can’t feel pity for a man who massacres cats; you can’t fathom reading about a society of cannibals—your brain is just too visual; you are too upset by ethnocentric, culturally imperialistic overtones; you desire a sense of immediacy to help heighten the conflict and sustain interest; religious back-and-forth annoys you.
  • (2/5)
    Intellectually, I can see why this is a good book and why it remains a proud member of the Western canon. Unfortunately, I couldn't bring myself to finish this. The prose is dry, Crusoe himself makes me want to bang my head repeatedly against a wall, and religious conversions always make it on to my top ten list of LEAST favorite things I like to see in my fiction. All in all, I get it. It's a classic. It's the first novel. It's important to our literary heritage. But that doesn't mean I want to read it.
  • (4/5)
    The story begins with the universal quest: the young man in Britain, torn between his safe home and his hunger for adventure, breaks away from his loving father and sails away into the unknown. After a series of harrowing escapes, he's shipwrecked on a desert island. His lively first-person account shows how his intelligence and education help him survive for many years, and how he uses technology, including guns and tools salvaged from the ship. He sets up home, reads the Bible, finds a parrot as a pet, and even devises a calendar to keep track of time. Then one day he finds a human footprint: "Was it someone who could save me and take me back to civilization? Or was it a savage who landed here?" When some "savages" arrive in several canoes, he uses his guns to get rid of them, and he rescues one of their captives, a handsome fellow with very dark skin. Delighted to have a companion at last, Crusoe names the newcomer Friday (since Crusoe found him on Friday).
  • (3/5)
    A classic long overdue in reading. Surprisingly detailed account of ship wreck, survival and faith
  • (2/5)
    The classic tale of Robinson Crusoe who is shipwrecked and lives alone on a deserted island for many years until he discovers a mysterious footprint.I am so thrilled to be done with this book. Although it's a classic and I can understand why it's achieved that status, I am thoroughly glad to not have to spend another second with Robinson Crusoe. The book is definitely a reflection of its time when European exploration was at its height. It's also one of the earliest examples of a deserted island narrative, where the protagonist spends many years alone. But for the modern palate, the book is more than a little dry.I had serious issues finding many elements of the story credible. The number of shipwrecks, rescues, crises, and encounters with wild animals/people go beyond what would be believable now. For example, ***SPOILER ALERT**** near the end of the book when Robinson Crusoe and his group are attacked by wolves 3 separate times, I was ready to throw the book against the wall, especially when the last group of wolves was 300 strong. What kind of mutant wolves are these?! ***END SPOILERS*** I also found the repetition within the narrative irritating. Not only would similar events happen several times in a row, but Robinson would have a similar reaction written with the exact same language every time. While there is some very impressive prose in some of Robinson Crusoe's more reflective moments, I spent a good chunk of the book going, "Seriously?!" Also the condescending attitude of Robinson Crusoe towards "savages," his religious hypocrisy, and his utterly blase attitude towards slavery rubbed me the wrong way. While probably quite thrilling when it was originally published in 1719, I didn't find the narrative exciting enough for my tastes.
  • (4/5)
    Robinson Crusoe is one of those books I first read as a kid in junior high school - and I still remember my excitement about the great adventure it described. The funny thing, though, is that during that first reading the moral of the story went right over my head. It is only now, having re-read the book as an adult, that I see that Crusoe's hard-earned spiritual transformation from godless man to believer might just have been Daniel Defoe's main point. While I was being thrilled by Crusoe's battles with pirates and cannibals, and his struggle to survive from one week to the next, an equally important story was happening inside Crusoe's head. Most everyone knows the basic plot of Robinson Crusoe: a young Englishman, seeking adventure, goes to sea and eventually, after already having escaped from Barbary Coast pirates, finds himself stranded on a desert island where he manages to survive for 28 years by avoiding the cannibals who use the island as their private picnic grounds. Crusoe finally makes his way back to England, but only after doing battle with both the cannibals and a group of mutinous sailors who stumble upon his island. No boy-reader would argue with a story like that one. But most of the "action" happens before Crusoe is shipwrecked and during the last two years of his stay on the island. In between, are the years Crusoe spends salvaging necessities from the shipwreck and figuring out how to manufacture items that he is unable to find on the ship before its remains wash away forever. The brilliance with which Crusoe was able to make the most of everything he carried ashore intrigued me on my first reading of the novel (and I probably enjoyed that aspect of the book even more than I enjoyed the battles Crusoe was involved in, truth be told) but I do not recall being overly impressed by Crusoe's belief that small "miracles" were being worked on his behalf by a god he, early on, barely believed existed. By modern standards, this is not a politically correct novel, but it should not be judged by modern standards. That a three-century-old novel can still appeal to modern youth is remarkable, and Robinson Crusoe should be appreciated as a snapshot in time, a novel reflecting the racial and political attitudes of its day. Recommend Crusoe to an early-teen-reader of your acquaintance and watch what happens.Rated at: 4.0
  • (4/5)
    This book was probably the first true novel, in the modern sense, published in the English language (1719). Much of the book details Crusoe's attempts to survive on his island, with quite detailed accountants of his efforts to grow crops, domesticate goats and make cooking utensils and other tools. Although this may sound quite dull, the writing style for the most part pulled me through. The narrative is quite positive and Crusoe comes to adopt a positive mental attitude by counting his blessings in terms of the articles he salvages from the shipwreck, the fact that the hulk is still accessible, and that there are no wild animals on his island. This is of course the original cannibal savages v. civilised white Anglo Saxon story, now a racist cliche, but then a worldview that all the book's readers would surely have shared nearly three centuries ago. Finally, I think the narrative should have ended when he came back to England, but instead there is a longish section on his property and financial arrangements and his fighting wolves in France, that seemed to lack a clear purpose.
  • (5/5)
    Why did I wait so long to read Daniel Defoe's classic "Robinson Crusoe?" The book, which follows the story of Crusoe who is marooned on a tropical island for decades is well-paced and thoroughly engrossing. Not only does Defoe detail what it takes to survive on a lonely island, he includes plenty of musing about religion and the craving for companionship and "stuff." There is a reason this book is considered a classic.
  • (5/5)
    I have seen countless movies regarding Crusoe. This book was as close to a first edition as I could get and it was much better than any movie produced to date. It was a pleasure to know what the author intended to deliver to the public, word-for-word. Must read!
  • (3/5)
    Robinson Crusoe was bored with his quiet life in England,so desided to go sea.But one day,his ship overturned and he reached the uninhabited island alone.This book is very interesting. I was impressed by his caurage. I think I want to be brave person like him.
  • (3/5)
    The majority of this book is enjoyable if you keep it in perspective. Being written as long ago as it was it still maintains a quality of easily read prose that I do not find in any other book of the time period. It leans a little heavily into religious thought but I suppose if you are stranded on an island for 28 years you have a lot of time to think!The end doesn't live up to the rest of the book. The last 20 odd pages are just a mess, and take the reader through some idiotic exercise in the mountains between Spain and France. There is a series of attacks by 300 wolves and bears and our man Friday teases a bear before killing him. Very bad.
  • (3/5)
    Not the gripping tale I had hoped it would be.My father had warned me that I might find Robinson Crusoe too simple in light of my recent Brontë adventures, and he was right - the writing is skilful, the plot adequate, but I was left unmoved.Written in the style of a diary (with a few unnecessary extra layers of diary-writing), the book follows Robinson Crusoe's misadventures at sea, from running away from home, joining a ship to Africa, being enslaved, escaping, sailing to Brazil, becoming a rich land-owner and becoming ship-wrecked while on a slave-gathering journey. We then follow twenty-something years of how he fends for himself on an uninhabited island (which seems to be remarkably abundant in everything he might need), and how he finally makes contact with savages and escapes from his island.Robinson himself is well-educated and therefore frames his thoughts eruditely, but there is little to like or dislike in his character - he is simply there. And alone.Maybe one needs to be male to appreciate/understand/enjoy this novelSomething I learnt in Germany: Management, Robinson Crusoe style, is just waiting for Friday.
  • (5/5)
    I may be the only person who has read two books by Daniel Defoe, neither of them Robinson Crusoe or Moll Flanders. Decided to finally remedy that. It may be heretical to say, but Robinson Crusoe feels more like a historical curiosity than a great novel. If the Odyssey or Bleak House were published for the first time today they would be considered masterpieces. If Robinson Crusoe were published today one would think the action was somewhat lame, the character's psychology implausible, and the novel lacking in a coherent structure, especially as manifested by the ending, not to mention the books racism and imperialism.That said, it as a very worthwhile historical curiosity and it is hard to imagine it not having been written and it is generally enjoyable to read,. The first quarter is a series of adventures culminating in Crusoe being stranded on an uninhabited island in the Caribbean. The last quarter is another series of adventures, not just his escape but -- oddly continuing to adventures like being attacked by wolves while traveling overland from Portugal to Northern France.,The middle half of the book is the timeless story of Crusoe's 27 years on the island, starting with his meticulous efforts to save as much as possible from the ship and continuing through his becoming increasingly productive through agriculture and livestock rearing, much of it described in minute and fascinating detail. Crusoe himself, however, is a stock character who has no psychological depth, no depth of emotion about his situation, and often has attitudes that seem implausible for someone stranded alone for more than twenty years.
  • (4/5)
    Robinson Crusoe is shipwrecked on an island after his slave ship runs aground. The rest of his crew soon die and Robinson is left to fend for himself. Robinson soon encounters a group of savages, one of which he befriends and names Friday, and the two work in tandem to get themselves off the island.Defoe’s work provides opportunity for various topics of discussion, ranging from the power of religion to the reconciliation of cultural differences. It is also an excellent book for examining the development of the English language, as the writing style is quite a bit different than most of the texts your students may have encountered.