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In a Dark, Dark Wood

In a Dark, Dark Wood

Geschrieben von Ruth Ware

Erzählt von Imogen Church


In a Dark, Dark Wood

Geschrieben von Ruth Ware

Erzählt von Imogen Church

Bewertungen:
4/5 (642 Bewertungen)
Länge:
9 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Aug 4, 2015
ISBN:
9781442390508
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

What should be a cozy and fun-filled weekend deep in the English countryside takes a sinister turn in Ruth Ware's suspenseful, compulsive, and darkly twisted psychological thriller.

Leonora, known to some as Lee and others as Nora, is a reclusive crime writer, unwilling to leave her nest of an apartment unless it is absolutely necessary. When a friend she hasn't seen or spoken to in years unexpectedly invites Nora (Lee) to a weekend away in an eerie glass house deep in the English countryside, she reluctantly agrees to make the trip. Forty-eight hours later, she wakes up in a hospital bed injured but alive, with the knowledge that someone is dead. Wondering not "what happened?" but "what have I done?", Nora (Lee) tries to piece together the events of the past weekend. Working to uncover secrets, reveal motives, and find answers, Nora (Lee) must revisit parts of herself that she would much rather leave buried where they belong: in the past.

In the tradition of Paula Hawkins' instant New York Times best seller The Girl on the Train and S. J. Watson's riveting national sensation Before I Go to Sleep, this gripping literary debut from UK novelist Ruth Ware will leave you on the edge of your seat through the very last second.

Includes an excerpt from Ruth Ware's The Lying Game!

A Simon & Schuster audio production.

Freigegeben:
Aug 4, 2015
ISBN:
9781442390508
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

Ruth Ware worked as a waitress, a bookseller, a teacher of English as a foreign language, and a press officer before settling down as a full-time writer. She now lives with her family in Sussex, on the south coast of England. She is the #1 New York Times and Globe and Mail (Toronto) bestselling author of In a Dark, Dark Wood; The Woman in Cabin 10; The Lying Game; The Death of Mrs. Westaway; The Turn of the Key; and One by One. Visit her at RuthWare.com or follow her on Twitter @RuthWareWriter.


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4.0
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  • (4/5)
    I liked this book a lot, but I knew what was going on. I had figured out the reason why everything happened and whodunnit before the book was too far along. That didn’t make it any less enjoyable, it just affected the suspense. It’s a well-written book and I would read more by the author.
  • (4/5)
    I don’t think I have read a book by Ruth Ware before but I certainly am making my way through her works now. I was hesitant to read the Woman in Cabin 10 because I wasn’t sure I would like it but as all my reviews show I am a reader for a certain style of writing and I was always looking forward to the few minutes I have to read and getting back to this book. So happy I happened upon one of her books at the book store marked down...now I can get to reading them all. I won’t say it was a perfect thriller but I didn’t figure out the end half way through the book nor did I fee like I wanted to...I just enjoyed the book.
  • (5/5)
    In a Dark Dark Wood follows the story of Leonora Shaw, who finds herself unwittingly in attendance at her school friend's Bachelorette party, although since the author is British, it's called a Hen Party. Lee, Leo, or Nora, goes through several names, and as a crime writer herself, you might think she's gathering material for her next book. She's mostly as confused as the reader throughout, this story keeps you guessing, and I recommend giving it a read.
  • (3/5)
    "I am running. I am running through moonlit woods, with branches ripping at my clothes, and my feet catching in the snow-bowed bracken."I've had this book in my TBR pile for the longest, so I couldn't wait to read it. From the moment I started reading, I was honestly hooked by its mystery in just a couple of pages. That's what drew me in. The guessing as every page I turned is what I liked the most while reading 'In a Dark, Dark Wood'. The characters were wild, to say. But they were all really likable in their own way. There was also one character, Flo, who drove me nuts. She was just so sensitive throughout the story. She wasn't my favorite. Leo, and the "deep" secret between her and her ex she couldn't tell anyone about, really disappointed me. I just didn't get why she just didn't say it. That's just my opinion.The plot was just a bachelorette party gone wrong. Jealous friends, obsessive friends, ex's and their feelings and a bunch of drunks all mixed together as one. What more could go wrong with a party in the woods? I think the setting could have been a bit creepier since they were at a cabin in the woods.I feel like Ruth Ware was repetitive in this story. It was an easy giveaway about what was going to happen a few chapters in. I do see why others would and wouldn't like this one. Although I didn't quietly hate this book, it wasn't my favorite. That's why I gave it 3 stars. It does give its thriller vibe to it, and it's being turned into a movie. So if you would like to read this before seeing the movie, then I suggest you do.
  • (4/5)

    In a Dark, Dark Wood is a psychological murder mystery novel by Ruth Ware.
    Nora Shaw is the narrator. She attempts to recall the events of a bachelorette weekend in which a man was murdered that both she and the bride-to-be loved. This proves to be difficult due to her amnesia as a result of that night.

    Meet Nora; a twenty-six year-old writer living in London, puzzling as to why she has been invited to Clare Cavendish’s hen do (bachelorette party weekend), because she and her old college friend have barely spoken for years. Nora turns her friend Nina de Souza, who has also been invited. Both girls make a pact to attend the weekend as long as the other goes.

    Nora and Nina rent a car to drive to Northumberland to stay in a summer house in the remote Kiedler Forest. This fabulous house belongs to the aunt of Clare’s best friend and hen host, Florence “Flo” Clay. It's a small group, including Melanie, a new mother and an old roommate of Flo and Clare’s. Then there's Tom, a gay playwright who works with Nora at the Royal Theatre Company. Tom feels uncomfortable that there is a shotgun in the house, even though it is only loaded with blanks. That evening, Nora goes out for a run, and encounters Clare on her way to the house. Clare explains to Nora that she needed to tell Nora face-to-face that she is marrying James, James Nora’s ex-boyfriend. Nora has never really gotten over him. Nora is stunned and hurt.

    As the weekend progresses, Melanie leaves early because she misses her baby. Nora is concerned that her phone has gone missing, and puzzled to find a set of footprints in the snow leading from the garage to the house. This house is in an extremely remote area and no one has been to the garage. Late at night, a "strange" man appears in the house. Flo intends to scare him off with the shotgun, only to discover that it is NOT loaded with blanks. The injured man turns out to be James. Clare rushes to drive James to the hospital. Nora’s memory becomes very spotty between here and her own arrival at a hospital with a terrible head injury which has cost her her short-term memory. The police come to consider Nora a suspect, for Clare is also in the hospital, and Nora struggles to remember what happened.
    Here the plot gets complicated and thick and you can't read fast enough to find out what happens next.

  • (4/5)
    Leonora is a 26-year-old writer, living alone. Out of the blue, she receives an email invitation to the hen (bachelorette) party of a past friend who she's not seen or spoken to in 10 years. Though initially reluctant, she eventually accepts the invitation, mostly out of curiosity. She heads off to the weekend getaway, located in a seemingly out-of-place glass house in the woods of the English countryside. Two days later, she wakes up in a hospital bed with a mild head injury, and only sketchy memories of the weekend. But someone is dead, and she has no initial memory of who it is or how it happened. And did she have something to do with it?This is the second novel of Ruth Ware's that I've read, both of which tend to give the reader a somewhat eerie, disturbed feeling, yet it's subtle and not so straightforward. I read both books on audio, and I suspect that some of this has to do with the voice of the reader, Imogen Church (who seems to narrate all of Ware's books). She is a good narrator, and there's something about her voice that's unsettling, lending itself well to the suspense factor in Ware's novels. This is not necessarily an action-packed mystery thriller, but there's enough mystique and suspense to keep the reader guessing. While this may not be a perfect novel, I enjoyed it, and I liked the way the suspense unfolded. I've got a couple more of Ware's novels on my reading stack, and I look forward to those as well.
  • (4/5)
    4.25 starsWhen Nora (Lee when she was growing up; both short for Leonora) is invited to the “hen party” (bachelorette party/stagette) of a friend from high school, a friend she hasn’t seen in 10 years, she wonders why she was invited. However, a mutual friend. Nina, decides to go, so Nora figures she’ll join them. This hen party is a weekend away in the woods in a glass house. Chapters alternate between what happened at the hen party and Nora currently in the hospital, with a police guard outside her hospital room door, while she tries to remember what happened. Imagine her surprise when she overhears the word “homicide”!I really liked this. It wasn’t go-go-go from the start, with the hen party and the set up there, but it was definitely enough to get me curious as to what was going on. Part-way through, especially with that glass house in the woods, it did get creepy in parts. Of course, it was easy to second-guess everything that went on, with Nora not really being able to remember what had happened. There was more history between Clair and Nora to delve into, as well.
  • (5/5)
    I know that this book has some quite negative reviews, but that didn't deter me one bit. The fact is, I'm easy to entertain, and I'm terrible at solving mysteries. Maybe those two things contributed to me liking this book so much, I don't know. I just know that I read it in three days, and would have finished it sooner than that if I hadn't, you know, had a life to deal with.

    I was fascinated with the setup - a group of (mostly) strangers, alone in a big glass house deep in the woods, completely secluded. Remember that movie 13 Ghosts? I loved it for a similar reason. Because WHO KNOWS what can happen in the middle of the woods in the dark of night? If a book features that setup, I'm in.

    I also love the whole unreliable narrator thing, and I think that Nora having lost her memory was a great way to do that. Again, I am AWFUL at solving mysteries, but I honestly had no idea what was going happen at any point. Some people have mentioned that the book was very predictable, but it didn't seem that way to me.
  • (5/5)
    I know that this book has some quite negative reviews, but that didn't deter me one bit. The fact is, I'm easy to entertain, and I'm terrible at solving mysteries. Maybe those two things contributed to me liking this book so much, I don't know. I just know that I read it in three days, and would have finished it sooner than that if I hadn't, you know, had a life to deal with.

    I was fascinated with the setup - a group of (mostly) strangers, alone in a big glass house deep in the woods, completely secluded. Remember that movie 13 Ghosts? I loved it for a similar reason. Because WHO KNOWS what can happen in the middle of the woods in the dark of night? If a book features that setup, I'm in.

    I also love the whole unreliable narrator thing, and I think that Nora having lost her memory was a great way to do that. Again, I am AWFUL at solving mysteries, but I honestly had no idea what was going happen at any point. Some people have mentioned that the book was very predictable, but it didn't seem that way to me.
  • (5/5)
    I know that this book has some quite negative reviews, but that didn't deter me one bit. The fact is, I'm easy to entertain, and I'm terrible at solving mysteries. Maybe those two things contributed to me liking this book so much, I don't know. I just know that I read it in three days, and would have finished it sooner than that if I hadn't, you know, had a life to deal with.

    I was fascinated with the setup - a group of (mostly) strangers, alone in a big glass house deep in the woods, completely secluded. Remember that movie 13 Ghosts? I loved it for a similar reason. Because WHO KNOWS what can happen in the middle of the woods in the dark of night? If a book features that setup, I'm in.

    I also love the whole unreliable narrator thing, and I think that Nora having lost her memory was a great way to do that. Again, I am AWFUL at solving mysteries, but I honestly had no idea what was going happen at any point. Some people have mentioned that the book was very predictable, but it didn't seem that way to me.
  • (4/5)
    While I did guess about mid way in who was responsible, that didn’t lessen my enjoyment of this book. Well plotted, well written, and the audio book narration was excellent. I look forward to reading all of Ruth Ware’s books.
  • (4/5)
    Ruth Ware writes books that are perfect audiobook companions for driving. In this thriller, the narrator, known in her youth as Lee and in the present as Nora, is invited to the hen weekend (bachelorette party for us Yanks) of the woman who used to be her very best friend. They have not spoken in 10 years, she is not invited to the wedding, and heaven knows why she decides to go, but old scores need to be settled by Clare the bride, or maybe by Flo, her obsessive new best friend. I confess I guessed most of it before it was all over, but still a good yarn, and a satisfying ending.
  • (4/5)
    Okay, I'm not talking about the children's story here, which is good in its own right. This is a much, much darker tale of a murder, suspense, and betrayal.

    Another hyped book (I've been suckered in lately), this one didn't let me down either. The children's story with the same title is a personal favorite and one of the first books my daughter learned to read on her own. Honestly, I expected it to follow that same story in a way... the ghost in the cabinet in the dark room upstairs in the dark house at the end of the road in the dark wood. It didn't though, so I was slightly disappointed there.

    I wouldn't call this the greatest mystery book, but I enjoyed reading it and trying to figure out how Nora's past caught up to her.

    This was a bit of a wild ride though. There were a lot of breadcrumbs early on in the story that I picked up on and a lot of peculiar behavior by some of the potential suspects. It was similar to an Agatha Christie novel where even the innocent are guilty of something.

    One of the things I loved the most about this one is the imagery. I felt like it was well-written and early on there was a sinister atmosphere established that only became darker.

    However, it was a little slower than I expected. Yes, we meet all the main characters early on, but the story dragged for a good chunk in the beginning. I never wanted to completely bail on it, but I did put the book down shortly after starting because I wasn't completely committed to it yet.

    Once the action picked up, I was in it for the long haul. The breadcrumbs helped me figure out, I think a little early, who was the killer and even how the murder was committed. I didn't have it completely figured out, but I had it about 90% pegged before the ending.

    I was also a little mad at the police investigation because I felt like some of the clues were too obvious. Clues that perfectly pointed at one person, to me, screamed that they were planted and that someone was being framed. I wanted to yell at the police officers a couple of times, "Open your eyes! You're being fooled!" With that said, as a reader I have information that not all of the characters do, so I didn't hold that against the fictional investigation.

    It felt a little unbelievable, but in that sort of this-can't-be-real sort of way, like when you watch the news and there's an unbelievable but completely true story. That's ultimately what sold me on the rating, that and the fact that once the action picked up, I couldn't put it down.

    For me, it was a quick binge read. It had enough mystery to keep me interested and even though I figured out who the murderer was early on, I kept feverishly reading to find out if I was right. I hoped I was wrong, but it was satisfying to have figured out the ending.
  • (4/5)
    Deliciously twisted!
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this one. It was, once again, a good mystery/thriller/suspense/who dun-it.

    I have decided that I am the worlds worst at solving mysteries. I had no idea until the very end how this was going to turn out.
  • (4/5)
    Ruth Ware is a one-click author for me. I always love the twists and turns of her stories and In a Dark, Dark Wood was no exception!
  • (5/5)
    I'm still reeling from the ride this book had me on. What an amazing journey. I loved every word on every page. This is one that will stay with me for a long time, I can feel it. Story telling at its best! Great characters, chilling atmosphere and mind-boggling mystery. Perfection!
  • (5/5)
    A handful of people that couldn't be any different from each other, all in one cabin for the weekend is enough to entice any reader to pick this book up. This book had me laughing, my jaw dropping, and my mind spinning as the plot thickened. I was stumped until the end and adored the narrator. I would recommend this book to anyone for a great psychological thriller.
  • (4/5)
    Solid psychological thriller in the vein of Girl on a Train, Gone Girl, The Kind Worth Killing et al. Some plot holes are left, but a fun and spooky read. Personally I was hoping for one more twist at the end, but maybe my standards are too high from other books in this genre.
  • (5/5)
    A handful of people that couldn't be any different from each other, all in one cabin for the weekend is enough to entice any reader to pick this book up. This book had me laughing, my jaw dropping, and my mind spinning as the plot thickened. I was stumped until the end and adored the narrator. I would recommend this book to anyone for a great psychological thriller.
  • (2/5)
    First half was rather flat and then the second half was your typical crimeStory with tons of suspects. Characters flat. Not my cupOf tea
  • (3/5)
    The statement on the front cover: "Prepare to be scared ... really scared." was very misleading. I expected a horror story or one really weird, but it did not meet my expectations. I'd call it a thriller or maybe suspense and really, most of the story consisted of setting up the denouement. The narrator, Leonora Shaw, a mystery writer, is drawn into accepting an invitation to a "hen", i.e., bachelorette, party for a girl she had known years before. The party goes wrong, and there is a murder, and the finger of suspicion points at Nora. It doesn't help that she finds herself in the hospital, injured and plagued with temporary amnesia. Secrets from a decade before come out. But I did not understand why she can't get the groom-to-be out of her mind in those years; he was an ex-boyfriend and had jilted her. The novel was really scary only for the last 50 pp. or so. It was a fast read but I could pick it up and put it down; nothing compelled me to read straight through in one sitting. I didn't like any of the characters.
  • (4/5)
    I did not see that twist coming! There were so many options available for who did it but that was the one person who I didn't think it was. There were a few times the book seemed to lag on but overall I really enjoyed this one.
  • (4/5)
    Very much enjoyed it!!
  • (4/5)
    Don't we all have a one that got away? For Leonora, now Nora, it was James. That first serious boyfriend, who when there was a crisis, broke it off with a text. She was Lee then. She left school and the friends she had and moved on, never forgetting James and what he meant to her. Ten years later, she gets an invite to a hen party from Clare, who had been her best friend back then and earlier, when they were little girls. Clare was beautiful and confident; everyone wanted to be her friend but Nora left her behind along with her memories of James. So why now? Why does Clare want her to come to a hen party when they hadn't spoken in 10 years?Fittingly, I was reading this book while at a cottage in northern Ontario in Canada; a cottage resort in the middle of nowhere without other guests staying there; that had a creep factor of its own. Have to admit, I did doublecheck the locks on the doors and occasionally listened for outside sounds. I devoured most of this is one day which is my favourite way to read a book, especially one of this genre. It was suspenseful and a little scary yet sad too. I pretty much knew what was what long before the ending but I definitely enjoyed the journey getting there. I will put this one on my list of movies to watch as it is to be released as a movie upcoming. I will soon read this author's next book "woman in Cabin 10".
  • (2/5)
    Nora, a crime writer, is invited to a hen weekend (bacherlorette party) for her former best school friend, whom she hasn't seen in ten years. The party is taking place in a strange, isolated house in a dark, snowy wood, and something very bad happens there, which Nora can't quite remember afterward.Ware is very good on suspense and atmosphere, and that's primarily what kept me reading, as well as the hope of a terrific payoff--which unfortunately I didn't get. Here we have a group of rather stereotyped characters in an unbelievable situation doing unbelievable things. For this to work, we need a greater depth of characterization to help explain their decisions, and some unexpected but ultimately believable twists. However, the characters remain one-dimensional until the end, and the surprises turn out to be not all that surprising. The situation seems contrived: there are secrets that the characters are keeping from one another that would either be very easy to guess and just common sense or that would have been impossible to keep secret for a decade--yet the whole plot hinges on them. I am also not a fan of "amnesia" as a literary device. I can definitely see this becoming a mediocre movie, but it reminds me that I'm probably better off avoiding books that have been compared to Gone Girl or The Girl on the Train.
  • (3/5)
    A group of friends gather together for the British equivalent of a bachelorette party, in the winter, out in the country. The future groom's ex from a decade earlier is invited. Personalities are exposed and a crime committed. Not my usual genre, but it kept my attention to the end.
  • (5/5)
    a twisty, fascinating book that kept me on the edge of my seat.
  • (4/5)
    In A Dark, Dark Wood by Ruth Ware; (4*); This one was a page turner for me. Several women who shared younger times with the bride-to-be come together in a gorgeous, but creeped out, glass house in the woods of Northumberland. They are here to celebrate the bride's coming nuptials. There are twisty turns and uneven (kind of like we arguably are in R/L) characters, multiple mysteries, murder & maham galore. Totally unrealistic plots but quite enjoyable with just the right amount of shivers for this reader.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent! Much better than The Woman in Cabin 10 and I thought that was an awesome, crisp read. Definitely recommend for anyone who's read Paula Hawkins or Ruth Ware's other books.