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The Drawing of the Three: The Dark Tower II

The Drawing of the Three: The Dark Tower II

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von Frank Muller


The Drawing of the Three: The Dark Tower II

Geschrieben von Stephen King

Erzählt von Frank Muller

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (549 Bewertungen)
Länge:
12 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Jan 1, 2016
ISBN:
9781508217442
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

Now a major motion picture starring Matthew McConaughey and Idris Elba.

The second volume in Stephen King's #1 bestselling Dark Tower Series, The Drawing of the Three is an "epic in the making" (Kirkus Reviews) about a savage struggle against underworld evil and otherworldly enemies.

"Stephen King is a master at creating living, breathing, believable characters," hails The Baltimore Sun. Beginning just less than seven hours after The Gunslinger ends, in the second installment to the thrilling Dark Tower Series, Roland encounters three mysterious doorways on a deserted beach along the Western Sea. Each one enters into a different person's life in New York-here, he joins forces with the defiant young Eddie Dean, and with the beautiful, brilliant, and brave Odetta Holmes, to save the Dark Tower.

"This quest is one of King's best…it communicates on a genuine, human level…but is rich in symbolism and allegory" (Columbus Sunday Dispatch). It is a science fiction odyssey that is unlike any tale that Stephen King has ever written.

Freigegeben:
Jan 1, 2016
ISBN:
9781508217442
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Billy Summers, If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


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4.6
549 Bewertungen / 129 Rezensionen
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  • (4/5)
    Book two in Stephen King's Dark Tower series.I complained a bit about the quality of the writing in the first volume. This one is definitely better written. Much more assured, and a much easier and more entertaining read. There are some pretty good moments of action, suspense, or horror, and some interesting bits of worldbuilding as we get to learn various little details about Roland's world by seeing our own world through his eyes.On the other hand, though, it still feels not so much like a story in itself as like a prelude to some story we're still being promised, and at some point, enough prelude is enough. I'm a little worried that pretty much the entire series might keep feeling like this, but we'll see. My real problem with it, though, is with one of the main characters, Odetta Holmes/Detta Walker. Who is, in fact, two people, and King clearly knows nothing about multiple personality disorder and hasn't bothered to research it, referring to her condition constantly as "schizophrenia," which is a common mistake, but a mistake nonetheless. Also, his attempt to write good and evil versions of a black woman from the 60s... Well, he means well, but I found the results a little cringe-inducing, anyway.Still, the series is moving in the right kind of direction for me, and I'm at least mildly interested to see where it goes from here.
  • (5/5)
    For me this is the best of series: development of Roland, and Eddie and especially Odetta/Detta/Susannah - the most complicated of the three. The incredible imagery of the suspended doors, and being able to step in and control another body other than yours. There is so much to love in this novel, and with each step you are never sure how it will go. Stephen King has a particular way of telling a story that gives you so much of the characters, you feel you know them personally, but at the same time perfects the ability to create suspense and the compulsion to read on. I can't wait to read the next one now.
  • (5/5)
    The continuation of Roland's story, the plot picks up its pace, but continues to deliver a punch and twist when least expected. A fantastic series so far, and I am looking forward to the next installment.
  • (4/5)
    I rate this book 3.5/5 stars. I though there were parts that dragged a bit, but as always, King has a knack for literally getting inside the minds of his characters and that makes this book a fun ride. I really enjoyed how the stories of the different characters were brought together by the end of the story, and it makes me want to continue reading this series in the near future.

    As King himself admits, this is not the usual style of fiction he writes, but I like it very much. It has fantasy elements, but it is more of a western style of main character and the fantasy feels a bit more science fiction like at this point.

    Anyway, good stuff.
  • (5/5)
    A wonderful sequel to The Gunslinger that draws us deeper into both Roland's character and world as well as introducing two interesting new characters. While The Gunsslinger can be seen as a brief introduction that promises much in terms of story, The Drawing of the Three delivers on those promises with some fascinating glimpses into what Roland's quest for the Dark Tower actually means. Highly recommended.
  • (3/5)
    One of the Dark Tower Series. Pretty typical Stephen King
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed this 2nd book more than the first. I wanted to go back to this to find out what happened, more than I did the first. None of the characters are at all pleasant but I wanted to see what was next. And boy, the split personality woman was horrible.
  • (4/5)
    What seems to flounder in the Gunslinger is made up for in the Drawing of the Three. Thrilling, creepy, and adventurous.
  • (5/5)
    This review is for the entire series of the Dark Tower series. It's my favorite fiction.

    A close second as far as fiction is King's Talisman.
  • (5/5)
    "What the hell was that?!!?" basically sums up my response to The Drawing of the Three. And I mean that in the best possible way. As I opined in my review of The Gunslinger, I have avoided The Dark Tower for so long because it's a series and usually series books serve up a formulaic reheating of what happened in previous books. I usually enjoy the first book, like the second book, and begin to get that deja vu feeling that I've read all of this before somewhere around book three. Not so with this bad mamma-jamma. The Drawing of the Three couldn't be more different from The Gunslinger--and yet it works. The Gunslinger offered a bleak, apocalyptic world and a terse writing style to match as we followed the Man in Black along with Roland, the last Gunslinger. At the end of the novel, Roland is told that three people will be key in aiding his quest to the Dark Tower, leading into The Drawing of the Three.In the second novel, the narrative begins with a shocking development in the first few pages that instantly causes us to reassess the character of Roland in terms of his abilities and his physical/emotional limits. Under considerable strain and a very real life-threatening situation, Roland begins to draw the three prophesied. As he does so, Roland breaks the barrier between his world and ours while discovering unlikely connections among the three people he encounters.Unlike The Gunslinger, the writing here is more descriptive and King does a superb job of capturing Roland's awe with the plenty offered in our world in contrast with the world that has "moved on," as well as creating tension with the character of Detta Walker (I was as on edge during her scenes as Roland was; reading chapters with her was emotionally exhausting). In the first novel, Roland talked about how the Dark Tower was some kind of nexus holding worlds and times together and The Drawing begins to explore and clarify this idea more so than the previous book did.It's very difficult to say much about the book without spoiling it, but King is to be commended for writing a book that varies in so many ways from the first novel and yet still seems a natural part of the world he created. If this continues, I may be one very happy series reader indeed.Now I just hope that I don't order the Lobstrosities the next time I'm at Red Lobster. Seriously, I'll never look at lobster in the same way again.
  • (5/5)
    OK, this is really weird. I know I read this before, probably close to when it was first published, in 1987. I re-read The Gunslinger in May and I remembered it pretty well. I barely remembered this one at all - I remember the 3 main characters (of course one was the Gunslinger from May), and a couple of plot points, but for the most point I didn't remember hardly anything. Logically, I think that should mean I shouldn't give it 5 stars, because I already read it and I hardly remember it! But, it was so good! I'm gong to blame this on a concussion I had in 1986...I can't think of any other good reason for why I forgot so much of this book.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent Artwork.
  • (3/5)
    The least favorite of the series for me thus far. While I really enjoy the storyline, it is written in a very crude and vulgar way which to me is unnecessary. No prude am I but I find that vulgarity to the extreme is not necessary to further the story. If it weren't such an interesting story - rather like the making of a legend - I would not recommend it.
  • (4/5)
    Three doors on a beach, three persona. Well done. I'll continue this series.
  • (5/5)
    "There I will sing all their names!"Here we have the second book in Stephen King's massive Dark Tower series. This was my second read-through of this one and, like my second read of The Gunslinger, I feel I could appreciate this one more the second time around. This is probably partially because I knew what was coming, even though it had been long enough that some of the minor details had slipped.Picking up almost exactly where the first book left off, Roland has been left quite a prophecy by the Man in Black. One that he doesn't quite understand just yet, but he will. Of course, not to make things too easy on our hero, he soon is confronted with terrors of the sea looking to have him for lunch! He doesn't come away unscathed, and now the clock is ticking.Last time, Jake Chambers was pulled into Roland's world. This time, Roland is going to get pulled into ours. Three need to be drawn; The Prisoner, The Lady of Shadows, and Death. Each of these three will bring their own unique challenges for Roland, who is already in a world of hurt from those damned lobstrosities. Can he draw these three to his world before the infection takes him? Or will one of them get to him before that?Yet another fantastic read from King, who knows how to pace a story within an inch of his life, or in this case, Roland's!
  • (4/5)
    The second installment in the Dark Tower series.I enjoyed the second book more than the first one (Gunslinger), for it details how Roland "draws" new characters from different times in our modern world. Roland becomes introduced to Eddie Dean (the prisoner) Odetta Hughes/Detta Walker (the lady of shadows), and Jack Mort (the pusher). Each new character brings something new and exciting for Roland, and his ultimate quest towards the Tower.
  • (4/5)
    NOW I'm hooked!!
  • (4/5)
    I was pleasantly surprised by this book. I was not a big fan of the first one in the series, and was a bit apprehensive in continuing the series. The Drawing of the Three is better written and contains a great deal more substance than its predecessor. I am now looking forward to reading the rest of the series.
  • (4/5)
    The first book was more of the laying down of the groundwork of the tale. The Drawing of Three had a significant change of pace. The jumping in and out of Roland's world kept me in the story. It was refreshing see the modern world through Roland's eyes. I can't wait for #3
  • (4/5)
    The Drawing of the Three marks a pretty dramatic shift from the weird, highly stylized Western that was The Gunslinger. With the introduction of two new characters, the focus is no longer so tightly centered on Roland, and relatively little time is spent in Mid-World as we go a-traipsin' through 20th century New York- much to my initial chagrin. But King handles all these new twists and turns with such aplomb that I found myself warming to it pretty quickly; a lesser writer would have seriously bunged things up here, but he is a master of his craft and doesn't do that for a few books yet.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic series. This book was by far the better of the entire series. The later books go too much over the top.
  • (3/5)
    I'm having a hard time understanding why everybody seems to have liked this book better than the first one in the series. "Character development"? Character dissolution, I'd call it. [SPOILER WARNING:] When the druggie falls in love with the schizophrenic chick, and the weary-unto-death gunslinger can't help himself from tearing up in empathy... you start to wonder when the author decided to give in to sentimentality. First one was too sparse? Well, here King more than makes up for it here by beating us over the head with, among other overused plot devices, the incessant homophobic, racist ranting of the above-mentioned schizophrenic. Not saying King's a racist, but is it really necessary to introduce into Roland's austere quest a woman who calls white people "honkies"?
  • (4/5)
    After reading The Gunslinger (DT 1), this volume seemed really to lack the poetic voice that I thought (hoped) would characterize the entire story. Nevertheless, the completely unpredictable turns of plot (Here are some key terms. Piece them together as best you can and then read the book and see if it came close. Might be fun. Heroin, Wheel chair, white, black, bricks, trains, legs, brother, cops, guns, lobsters, fingers, doors . . . go!) really caught me. Perhaps they'll catch you.
  • (3/5)
    Cool, harsh characters, kinda gross and disturbing, no plot really, he didn't know where he wanted to go with it so he stalled.
  • (5/5)
    Book 2 of the Dark Tower is more narrative than its predecessor. Roland, with the Man in Black's tarot cards on his mind, finds three successive doors on a wasteland beach. Each door leads to New York - our world - and to fate. The most compelling of the three doorways (and sections of the book) is The Prisoner. Eddie Dean feels the most human of all the characters in the book and is the person the reader can most identify with. I was particularly struck with the writing when Eddie, a junkie, starts telling his story - the language becomes compressed and fast-paced, like someone itching to get another hit.
  • (5/5)
    great series, i recommend it to anyone who ever had even a nodding acquantance with walt whitman
  • (5/5)
    This, along with The Waste Land is my favorite of the Dark Tower series. This is where Roland's journey to the tower stops being a loner's quest- here is where he fills his ka-tet (Don't know what that means? It's like a spiritual circle, linked by fate toward a common goal. Arthur and his knights would be ka-tet.) Strange doors on a lonely beach connect Roland with our world, and the companions foretold on the Man in Black's tarot deck: The Prisoner, the Lady of Shadows, and Death.A haunting book, beautiful and fantastic.
  • (5/5)
    This is one of my favorites of the "Dark Tower" series. I just love how he gets to meet his new companions and their background stories on the road to the dark tower.
  • (4/5)
    Much better then the first book, look forward to reading the next.
  • (5/5)
    After the first book, this is probably the best in the series in terms of developing the overall plot of the series and introducing new characters. In retrospect the only complaint I have with the book is that the third isn't drawn until the following book, The Wastelands, and I think it hurts the overall story of this book, not letting it stand completly on it's own.