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The Woman in Cabin 10

The Woman in Cabin 10

Geschrieben von Ruth Ware

Erzählt von Imogen Church


The Woman in Cabin 10

Geschrieben von Ruth Ware

Erzählt von Imogen Church

Bewertungen:
4/5 (966 Bewertungen)
Länge:
11 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Jul 19, 2016
ISBN:
9781508217749
Format:
Hörbuch

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Anmerkung des Herausgebers

Modern classic whodunit…

The intensely intimate setting (a luxury cruise ship) ratchets up the fear and paranoia when things go awry. It’s impossible to escape the allure of this modern twist on classic Agatha Christie murder mysteries.

Beschreibung

INSTANT NEW YORK TIMES AND USA TODAY BESTSELLER

FROM THE AUTHOR OF IN A DARK, DARK WOOD

Featured in TheSkimm

An Entertainment Weekly "Summer Must List" Pick

A New York Post "Summer Must-Read" Pick

Included in Summer Book Guides from Bustle, Oprah.com, PureWow, and USA TODAY


From New York Times bestselling author of the "twisty-mystery" (Vulture) novel In a Dark, Dark Wood, comes The Woman in Cabin 10, an equally suspenseful and haunting novel from Ruth Ware-this time, set at sea.

In this tightly wound, enthralling story reminiscent of Agatha Christie's works, Lo Blacklock, a journalist who writes for a travel magazine, has just been given the assignment of a lifetime: a week on a luxury cruise with only a handful of cabins. The sky is clear, the waters calm, and the veneered, select guests jovial as the exclusive cruise ship, the Aurora, begins her voyage in the picturesque North Sea. At first, Lo's stay is nothing but pleasant: the cabins are plush, the dinner parties are sparkling, and the guests are elegant. But as the week wears on, frigid winds whip the deck, gray skies fall, and Lo witnesses what she can only describe as a dark and terrifying nightmare: a woman being thrown overboard. The problem? All passengers remain accounted for-and so, the ship sails on as if nothing has happened, despite Lo's desperate attempts to convey that something (or someone) has gone terribly, terribly wrong…

With surprising twists, spine-tingling turns, and a setting that proves as uncomfortably claustrophobic as it is eerily beautiful, Ruth Ware offers up another taut and intense read in The Woman in Cabin 10-one that will leave even the most sure-footed reader restlessly uneasy long after the last page is turned.
Freigegeben:
Jul 19, 2016
ISBN:
9781508217749
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

Ruth Ware worked as a waitress, a bookseller, a teacher of English as a foreign language, and a press officer before settling down as a full-time writer. She now lives with her family in Sussex, on the south coast of England. She is the #1 New York Times and Globe and Mail (Toronto) bestselling author of In a Dark, Dark Wood; The Woman in Cabin 10; The Lying Game; The Death of Mrs. Westaway; The Turn of the Key; and One by One. Visit her at RuthWare.com or follow her on Twitter @RuthWareWriter.


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Was die anderen über The Woman in Cabin 10 denken

4.0
966 Bewertungen / 205 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (3/5)
    Didn't love it, but it was fine. This is the one with the woman on the small cruise ship, with the mystery woman in Cabin 10.
  • (3/5)
    A little slow in spots, but overall I enjoyed it.
  • (3/5)
    After reading the reviews my expectations were high for The Woman in Cabin 10. It was okay. The twists weren't that grand and the ending was too much of a surprise.
  • (3/5)
    I am really confused about the rating for this book. I think I settled on a 3.5 stars. One thing was that all the reviews I had read had me thinking great things and then it was not great. It is a good read, but not a great one.

    Laura, Lo, Blacklock works as a writer for a travel magazine. When her boss ends up under the weather due to pregnancy, Lo is given the opportunity to go on a cruise for a a new luxury ship, the Aurora Borealis, and write an article for the magazine. Sounds wonderful. From the beginning, Lo has one rotten experience after another. The night before she is to leave, her apartment is broken into with her in it. Getting no sleep, being hungover and suffering PTSD, her cruise does not get off to a good start. Once again, drinking a bit too much the first night on board, she has a fitful sleep. Waking in the middle of the night, she hears a splash and when she runs out to her balcony, she is sure she sees a body sinking under the water. Sure it is the woman in the cabin next door, she calls security. When the chief of security listens to her story, he takes her to Cabin 10, which they find clean and empty. Lo is confused as she had knocked in the door earlier in the evening and met her neighbour. No one believes what she is sure she saw, so forgetting about the reason she is on the ship, she begins to ask questions and snoop around. Trouble has no trouble finding Lo.

    I do not want to give away anymore of the plot, but suffice it to say, Lo is going to have more than her share of difficulties on this cruise. The suspense builds quite nicely, then quickly switches gears and comes to a quick end. Lo realizes that she needs to be strong and fight for herself because no one else is around to help her. The secondary characters are not really fleshed out, but that is okay as they are only supporting characters. A book that will hook you, if only to find our what happens to Lo. The publisher generously provided me with a copy of this book via Netgalley.
  • (5/5)
    I listened to the audio copy of the book-- excellent narrator!
    Despite the fact that there was tragedy upon this "boutique" cruise, I couldn't keep myself from looking up information on luxury criuses--bucket list item, for sure!!!
    This was another one of those stories I just couldn't stop listening to--loved the writing and the storyline, and OH EM GEE, did I ever adore Lo Blacklock! I wanna be besties with her!!!
  • (5/5)
    Twists and turns make for fun reading.
  • (5/5)
    Two days before a career changing business trip aboard the luxury cruise liner, Auroras, maiden voyage, Lo Blacklocks London flat is broken into and burgled. Lo, writer for the travel magazine, Velocity, is shaken but not harmed and despite her sleep deprived state (who can sleep comfortably after a break in?) she packs her bags and boards the vessel in what is promised to be 5 days of top of the line luxury cruising. After perhaps one too many drinks, while sleeping fitfully in her cabin on the first night, Lo hears a scream from the cabin next door, and the distinguishable sound of a body hitting the water outside. Rushing to her balcony she can make out the body of a woman sinking beneath the waves. Immediately calling staff security, they are confused with her desperate attempts to explain what she heard/saw. No one had been assigned to cabin 10, the investor who was slated for that room cancelled last minute and it remains unoccupied. But that doesn’t explain who the woman was Lo saw in the room before dinner, the one who lent her some mascara. And she is certain she heard that scream and splash. As Lo starts digging, someone tries to thwart her every move. Stuck out at sea, Lo is trapped on board with a killer, but who? And who was the woman in cabin 10?This was like a modernized version of Murder on the Orient Express. Stuck in the middle of the ocean on a small luxury cruiser, the suspects are obviously very limited. Lo’s profession as a journalist and thus her investigative nature obviously lends well to the plot. There are some amazing “ah-ha!” moments that are honestly really just masterful. I was engaged, enthralled, and enraptured the entire time. The two fold mystery of who the woman was (and why no one knew she was aboard) as well as who killed her (and why) had my gears working double time trying to fit the pieces together (I definitely didn’t fit them together either haha). Ware did a good job of making Lo just unreliable enough (drinking, lack of sleep, mental health history, recent burglary that set her on edge) that the stone walls she kept running into with the security officer and other passengers was plausible. And let’s face it, her gender helped too; women are all too often thought to be hysterical or over-imaginative Overall this read was thrilling and suspenseful, the perfect mix of intrigue and conspiracy. I have officially now read all of Wares books and CAN’T WAIT for her 2019 publication The Turn of the Key.
  • (3/5)
    This book kept me in a tense state until I could figure out what was going on.....I felt slightly let down at that point, but was very engaged for most of the read.
  • (3/5)
    3.0
    This started out great! I was rushing through the pages as fast as I could only to lose momentum towards the end. I think once the big shock was revealed I just lost interest. Much like "The Girl on the Train", I didn't find the main character, Lo, very likable so when the mystery was solved and you understood what was going on....I just wasn't that concerned about her anymore.

    ....I guess I'll always be a sucker for the most anticipated books. This one just fell a bit short for me.
  • (3/5)
    The Woman in Cabin 10. Ruth Ware. 2016. I think my problem with this book and the two previous ones is that their quality is so far below that of Plainsong that they are all a disappointment. Ware’s book was on the best seller list for quite a while, and the movie will probably be very good. It is a page turner. Lo is a travel writer who is on an exclusive cruise on a small elegant ship. Her first night on board she hear a noise, runs out on her balcony, and think she sees something, maybe a body sinking. She looks next at next cabin and sees a smear of blood on the glass on the balcony. She is not sure what she saw and no one believes her. She doesn’t know who to trust and is filled with fear and anxiety. Ware is new to me, but she has the reputation of writing good suspense novels and this one is good, for what it is.
  • (4/5)
    While the book started with what seemed like a great concept - a murder mystery on a cruise ship - the main character wasn't all that loveable and I found myself not really concerned about her ultimate outcome. I found the story to be good but not great. There were some twists and that made it enjoyable. Easy to read and good for perhaps a beach vacation.
  • (5/5)
    Oh, my gosh, It took me a while to figure out why this book has had such positive reviews. Then I GOT IT! Wow, it turned into a murder mystery with an original plot and lots of danger. At the end, all I could say was I am glad I am not rich enough to afford one of those swanky yacht cruises.
  • (5/5)
    My co-worker lent me this book and while it is not something I would choose for myself I got drawn into it very quickly. It was a very interesting mystery and I enjoyed it a great deal. It made for a quick read.
  • (4/5)
    I started a bit exceptic about this book despite all the rumors about it. But I must admit it really got me. Even in the last pages it had a couple of twist that surprise me. I do not read too often thrillers, I do not why because I do enjoy them, but at any rate this is a pretty good read that do not disappoint. The characters have some flows, they make mistakes and not always get the things right, but that is how we all are. We are human. If someone likes thrillers this is a good read.
  • (4/5)
    This is the story of Laura Lo Blackstock she is a journalist she is invited to attend a posh boat maiden voyage.The boat is on its way to Norway when from there is a strange lady in the Cabin next door to her, Lo tries to find out who this woman is but she gets no answers. She knows something is wrong but no one can help her. It turns out the owner of the fancy boat Richard Bulmer kills his wife Ann with the help of his new girlfriend Carrie who disguises herself as Ann.Carrie then takes Lo prisoner to keep her away from Richard. Lo convinces Carrie that Richard is a proper evil man, Carrie kills him then at the end of the story Carrie transfers money to Lo's Bank account.
  • (4/5)
    Pretty good thriller, and a cruise ship makes for a claustrophobic atmosphere. But I figured out the mystery by Chapter 2, so anyone who compares this book to Then There Were None needs to go back and read Then There Were None.
  • (4/5)
    Very Agatha Christie-like. Strangers on a cruise in the North Sea. Someone sees a murder. Was it real or imagined? This one kept me guessing almost until the reveal. The portrayal of the protagonist's anxiety and freight train of thoughts was very accurate.
  • (3/5)
    I thought this was a good read. Thought I had it figured out, but was wrong! A really good who-done it
  • (4/5)
    Laura ("Lo") Blacklock is a travel journalist who's just been given the opportunity to join an elite crew aboard a small luxury cruise ship on its maiden journey. A few days prior to the ship's departure, she becomes the victim of a burglary in her apartment. She suffers only minor injury, but the psychological effects stick with her. Shortly after the ship sets sail, she witnesses (via what she hears & the evidence immediately afterward) what she believes to be a murder: a woman thrown overboard. However, when she attempts to report what she's witnessed, no one believes her and more importantly, no one on the ship is unaccounted for. But how can things continue as if nothing has happened, when she knows what she heard & saw? This is a classic story of an unreliable witness. Lo tends to drink too much, she takes medication for anxiety, and she was recently the victim of a tragic event (the burglary), making her paranoid and anxious. Did she really see & hear what she thought she did, or was she imagining things and blowing them out of proportion? I, for one, was swept up in the story and went back and forth with what I was willing to believe. I thought, for the most part, that the story was well crafted, with a fair amount of suspense and intensity, and I enjoyed it. I may have even rated this higher, were it not for the fact that the main character of Lo was at times intensely dislikeable. That seems to be the norm with a lot of these novels with unreliable witnesses. Why is is that they have to be both unreliable AND unlikeable? This novel had similarities to both The Girl on the Train and The Woman in the Window, both of which I also enjoyed. Though this is the first of Ruth Ware's novels that I've read, I've got all of her others on my TBR pile, and I'm now anxious to dive into those as well.
  • (2/5)
    Disappointing read for me, especially since I liked Ruth Ware's first book, In a The Dark, Dark Wood. The Woman in Cabin 10 is about Lo Blackman, she is robbed before going on a small cruise for her job, so she is a little on edge when the woman in the cabin next to her (cabin 10....) goes missing, but everyone is telling her that room was empty and everyone is accounted for. It sounds interesting even though this has been done so many times before, but what made it boring was that Lo's investigating serves no point to the story and the ending is pretty anticlimactic. There are also a lot of loose ends and the ending doesn't feel like a ending because you are left with so many questions.
  • (3/5)
    Because of her boss' hospitalization, Laura "Lo" Blacklock, a travel magazine writer, receives the opportunity to travel on a small privately-owned cruise ship's maiden voyage. Robbed in her own apartment a couple of days before departure, she still suffers from the traumatic experience. She borrowed mascara from the woman next door in cabin 10 when she cannot find her own. When she sees a woman pushed overboard from that cabin later that evening, the crew and security guards tell her the person booked for that cabin cancelled and no one stayed there. Lo knows she consumed alcohol and suffered the trauma of victimization, but she also knows she is not delusional as others imply. Tensions mount. Lo becomes a victim once again. Will she make it off the ship alive? This book received much acclaim, but it failed to live up to its hype. Unnecessary verbiage, particularly the repeated use of the "f" word by the central character, failed to propel the narrative, weakening the story where the author needed to do more to give characters dimension. The abrupt conclusion left readers with more questions than answers.
  • (4/5)
    This is definitely a fast paced, edge of your seat thriller. This is my first book by the author and it definitely won't be my last. With a plot twist I didn't see coming this book kept me reading way past my bedtime.
  • (4/5)
    An intriguing premise of a missing passenger who apparently was never on board. I was enthralled by this book from page one. The mysterious passenger angle had me working on many implausible theories but the reality was so much better.
  • (4/5)
    This was a really good mystery/thriller/suspense! There were several twists and turns that kept me guessing until the very end.
  • (2/5)
    Dull, waste of time. Boring, flat characters.
  • (3/5)
    I was about to head off on a trip to Iceland to try to spot the Northern Lights, so what better to take with me than this book in which the main character is aboard a boat to Norway, intent on the same thing. It started strongly - an Agatha Christie-esque set-up, with an apparent murder (someone being flung overboard) and a cast of suspects within an enclosed space. All it needed was M. Poirot to turn up, stroking his moustache. The many fellow passengers offered plenty of scope for speculation by the reader. I was even wondering if there was some kind of tie-in with the break-in the central character had suffered in the opening chapter, and the boyfriend. Perhaps because of this scope for speculation the eventual explanation was a disappointment - revealed too early, far too simple, and left a lot of pages still to fill. The final stages were particularly weak - like the author didn't know how to bring it to a finish - and the Northern Lights, though they did appear, were little more than an afterthought.
  • (4/5)
    This is the definition of building tension. I almost gave up on this one due to the slow start but, thanks to the impressive narrative skills of Imogen Church, I stuck with is and was glad I did. The ending was worth the wait.
  • (4/5)
    Not as good as her first. However, a very gripping plot once the protagonist, Lo, actually gets on the cruise ship. Would be four stars, but loses half a star for the incredibly weak and overly long beginning. Also, it's very hard to hang with a character who is exhausted to the point of collapse from page one; an author should give the reader a break once in a while, unless the book is set in a concentration or labor camp. I recognized the killer from the first conversation between killer and Lo, but then I have special experience with psychopaths. Fantastic ending.
  • (4/5)
    I thoroughly enjoyed The Woman in Cabin 10. Constantly kept me glued to the pages, and the characters were so fun! Great suspense novel.
  • (4/5)
    I have read many reviews saying this is a story reminiscent of Agatha Christie's works. That is the case, so I guess that's why it sometimes grabs you and sometimes plods along, but if you pay attention there are a lot of clues strewn along the way, and in the end you keep guessing and guessing and guessing and are probably wrong and surprised at the ending. Lo Blacklock is not very likable, even after the home invasion and everything that happens to her, but you somehow feel she is not the usual unreliable narrator. You know there is something wrong and you send she is in danger. I kept wanting to say stop, don't go there, don't ask that question. But she persisted.A lot of twists and turns and a somewhat surprising ending. Good read.