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The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole

The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole

Geschrieben von Sue Townsend

Erzählt von Nicholas Barnes


The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole

Geschrieben von Sue Townsend

Erzählt von Nicholas Barnes

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (13 Bewertungen)
Länge:
5 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Apr 6, 2015
ISBN:
9781471293634
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

The troubled teenager continues to struggle valiantly against the slings and arrows of growing up and his own family's attempts to scar him for life.

In between the ups and downs of his relationship with the divine Pandora and worrying that his genius is going unrecognized, Adrian Mole chronicles the pains and pleasures of a misspent adolescence.

A W. F. Howes audio production.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Apr 6, 2015
ISBN:
9781471293634
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

Sue Townsend was born in Leicester, England, in 1946. Despite not learning to read until the age of eight, leaving school at fifteen with no qualifications, and having three children by the time she was in her mid-twenties, she managed to be very well read. Townsend wrote secretly for twenty years, and after joining a writers’ group at the Phoenix Theatre, Leicester, she won a Thames Television Award for her first play, Womberang, and became a professional playwright and novelist. Following the publication of The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged 13¾, she continued to make the nation laugh and prick its conscience with seven more volumes of Adrian’s diaries, five popular novels—including The Queen and I, Number Ten, and The Woman Who Went to Bed for a Year—and numerous well-received plays. Townsend passed away in 2014 at the age of sixty-eight, and remains widely regarded as Britain’s favorite comic writer.  


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  • (5/5)
    The second installment of diary entries of Adrian Mole, a naive teenager who believes himself to be an intellectual. I read this as a child and found it funny then and even funnier now that I understand Adrian's misinterpretations of the event in his life even better. The audiobook narrator, Nicholas Barnes, does a really great job with Adrian's voice.
  • (3/5)
    This book is so much like the one which preceeds it that I find it difficult to write an entirely separate review. This is (most of) what I had to say about The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13 3/4: "Adrian Mole, precocious British teenager, self-professed intellectual, and diarist tells us of his trials and tribulations. His musings are funny, sweet, and ultimately poignant. Adrian is such a real and believable character that it's hard to believe he sprung from the mind of a middle-aged woman, who herself has never, presumably, been a 13 and 3/4 year old boy. Of course, neither have I. I am also not British, and not well-acquainted with early 1980's Britain and know nothing of British politics. I often find it difficult to read literature from countries I have not visited or studied extensively, but the colloquialisms herein are not as mystifying or unable to be understood from context in this work as others I have read. I would recommend this book to any American Anglophile or any young adult who would in any way identify with the engaging character of Adrian Mole."The only thing I have to add about this edition of the series is that I find it a little hard to believe that a 15-year-old as well-read and 'intellectual' as Adrian is completely oblivious to certain things. It's rather annoying and makes him a bit less believable of a character. However, this book is still literally laugh out loud funny.
  • (4/5)
    The second volume in the series of Adrian Mole books, another re-read from my youth. This covers the period from the Falklands War in April 1982 to the eve of the general election in June 1983, when Adrian is just about to sit his O levels (as was I). These first two books were really good, and the humour is laugh out loud funny. The early 1980s do feel like a different world in many ways, a world without the internet and mobile phones. I was shyer than Adrian, but my family background was a lot more stable.
  • (4/5)
    After surprising myself by liking the first in the Adrian Mole series, I started working my way through the rest of the series, starting with this one, "The Growing Pains of Adrian Mole".There are some great lines here (opening the book at a random, the first line I see is "The nearest Barry Kent has been to Japanese culture is sitting on the pillion of a stolen Honda"), and deep thoughts mixed in with a statement showing he still doesn't quite understand much of the world. The Adrian Mole series becomes more depressing as he ages so this one is still humorous without being tempered by feelings of mortality.