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Emma (Ungekürzt)

Emma (Ungekürzt)

Geschrieben von Jane Austen

Erzählt von Eva Mattes


Emma (Ungekürzt)

Geschrieben von Jane Austen

Erzählt von Eva Mattes

Bewertungen:
3.5/5 (64 Bewertungen)
Länge:
17 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Aug 23, 2012
ISBN:
9783839811061
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Die 21-jährige Emma Woodhouse ist wohlhabend, schön und der strahlende Mittelpunkt der Gesellschaft im beschaulichen Highbury. Das angenehme Leben mit ihrem etwas lebensfremden Vater genießt sie in vollen Zügen und denkt nicht daran, ihre Unabhängigkeit für eine Heirat aufzugeben. Allerdings beschließt sie im Glauben an ihre vollkommene Menschenkenntnis, zumindest für Verbindungen unter ihren Freunden zu sorgen, und richtet damit ein Gefühlschaos an, das bald auch ihr eigenes Glück bedroht...
Freigegeben:
Aug 23, 2012
ISBN:
9783839811061
Format:
Hörbuch


Über den Autor

Jane Austen (1775–1817) was an English novelist known for her fiction set among England’s landed gentry. She was the seventh of eight children and was educated mostly at home in Hampshire. Her best-known works include Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Mansfield Park, and Emma. Although her novels, all of which were published anonymously, did not bring her fame during her lifetime, she is now one of the most widely read writers in the English language. 


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3.5
64 Bewertungen / 222 Rezensionen
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  • (4/5)
    Emma Woodhouse is 21. She lives with her father and from the age of 12 was raised by him and a live-in governess, Miss Taylor who is now the newly married Mrs. Weston. Emma set things rolling for that romance to take hold; at least she believes she did.Emma has a passion for arranging couples. The book follows her as she sets out to arrange a fitting match for Miss Harriet Smith. Readers either cringe or enjoy the ride as they watch Emma woefully mess up Miss Smith's life for a time.Through all of this Emma avers that she has no intention of every marrying. Of course that stand is well challenged by the end of the book.I very much enjoyed reading this Jane Austen novel. The only other book of hers that I have read is Pride and Prejudice which I loved. P&P was a masterpiece. I feel that Emma was a good book but not as witty or as culturally astute as P&P. I eagerly look forward to reading more of Miss Austen's works.Oh, and I can't step away without saying the Mr. Woodhouse, described at the beginning of the book as a "valetudinarian:a person who is excessively concerned about his or her poor health or ailments" really got on my nerves!
  • (4/5)
    Honestly I found this to be one of the harder Austen novels to read. The plot wasn't as captivating as some of her other works, nor were the characters as interesting. Mr. Knightly and Emma are, of course, exceedingly interesting, but everyone else I found rather blah and dull which might have been the point. Emma is an absolute scoundrel and I was constantly reminded of the Austen quote where she tells her sister I believe that Emma is a protagonist only she will like. There are a lot of interesting choices and techniques used in this novel that require some more pondering and close reading, but I will say this: Emma is not the best Austen novel, but it is probably one of the best literary pieces she produced.

    All in all, I would recommend this book to the dedicated Austen fans, but I probably wouldn't recommend it as a starter into Jane Austen literature.
  • (3/5)
    Maybe I shouldn't have listened to this as an audio book because I found it kind of boring. I'm looking forward to listening to more of her books.
  • (4/5)
    Although Emma isn’t going to displace Sense & Sensibility and Pride & Prejudice as my favorite Austen, it was definitely a fun read. The introduction mentions that Emma was Austen’s favorite character she created and I can see why. She’s sometimes naive or snobby, but she’s also cheerful, happy, and concerned with the happiness of others. I thought her father and sister were pretty funny, unique characters as well. The way relationships develop between characters is generally slow, subtle, and believable. The end is a bit abrupt and everything wraps up a bit too neatly, but I was in the mood for a light read and actually liked that the resolution wasn’t drawn out too much. Overall, this was a very fun, light read.

    This review first published at Doing Dewey.
  • (4/5)
    An extremely enjoyable and often hilarious slice of Georgian life featuring the spoiled, snotty, but also weirdly lovable Emma who is very convinced she understands how everyone feels even when she is repeatedly proven wrong (even about herself). Austen has the ability to draw characters that are simultaneously pointed caricatures and lovingly individualistic portraits. It is no wonder she published her novels anonymously during her lifetime, because I'm sure her friends, family, and acquaintances could find themselves in these pages. Not sure how I made it this long without reading this one, but I'm glad I finally did.
  • (2/5)
    Not the biggest Jane Austin fan, as I find her subject matter not as engaging as some would have me believe. It's a well written book, and her humor is definitely there, but I just don't get the same feeling from Emma as I did from say, Pride and Prejudice. It was alright, but still, I needed to force myself to finish this one off.
  • (4/5)
    Emma is a classic novel that still delights after all this time. It follows the spoilt but well-intentioned titular character as she develops schemes to fix her friends up with suitable husbands. For the most part, they all backfire, leaving some of her acquaintances worse off than they were before. Despite this, you can't help but still like Emma. All of the characters, including her, are very well developed and have humorous quirks and interactions throughout the story. Folks who like the movie "Clueless" might like this book as it is the very closely related basis for the film.
  • (4/5)
    Emma is from the leading family in Highbury, living alone with her widowed father at Hartfield. She loves to play matchmaker, feeling her skills quite superior after her friend's marriage went exactly as she hoped. Now Emma has set her sights on Harriet, a young woman of unknown parentage whom Emma wishes to match with the local vicar. The book is a comedy of misunderstandings and secrets. People often don't talk about how they really feel, leaving things up for interpretation, and often misinterpretation.I really enjoyed Emma. The prose is very simple, making it an easy read. I like that Emma herself is a flawed character who comes to recognize her flaws and works to correct them. Not everyone in the story is as self-aware as she is, and that's part of the fun. Austen created a cast of characters here whom you could easily recognize in real life. (How many of us know a talkative Miss Bates?) It's a romantic comedy where the matchmaker lead has no desire for marriage herself, which is perhaps unusual in this genre (and also serves to make the story more interesting). I wholeheartedly recommend reading Emma. It's a fun, low-stakes comedy, with lovable characters and a happy ending.
  • (4/5)
    I must begin by stating that I may be utterly biased here. Emma is the novel that introduced me to the treasure that are Jane Austen's masterpieces. I read it when I was fourteen, and fell in love with it right there and then. People often tend to mention that Emma Woodhouse is the least likeable heroine Jane Austen has created. It may be so, since she is rather headstrong, spoiled and with a strong tendency to plan other people's lives, without giving a second thought to all possible consequences, secluded in the protection of Hartfield, her house, her bubble. It may be so but we should not forget that she has no siblings, and an onlychild, more often than not, believes that the world probably revolves around him/her. And I am an onlychild, so don't judge me... :)I recently revisited Emma's world for a group discussion, and I once again found myself utterly charmed by Jane Austen's creation. In this novel, she presents all the vices of the aristocracy, all the possible ways the high and mighty use to look down on those who are less fortunate, and she does so with style and elegance, and her unique satire. Yes, Emma is a difficult character, but I think we must regard her the way we do with a younger sister or a younger cousin who has yet to experience the difficulties of the ''real'' world ''out there''. Emma is a charming character, for all her faults. Frankly, I find her a bit more realistic than the other iconic heroines, the ever - perfect Elizabeth, the always - sensible and cautious Eleanor, or the ever - waiting, passive Anne. Emma makes many mistakes and regrets, but her heart is kind. After all, don't we become a little stupid when we fall in love? (view spoiler)The rest of the characters are all iconic as well. Mr .Knightley is sensible, gentle, gallant, the true voice of reason. I highly prefer him compared to Mr. Darcy. Frank Churchill joins Sense and Sensibility's John Willoughby as the two most unsympathetic young suitors in Jane Austen's works, Harriet is well...Harriet, and Miss Taylor is a lady that I believe all of us would want as a close friend and adviser.Emma is a wonderful journey, full of satire, lively, realistic characters and the beautiful descriptions of a tiny English town. It is small wonder that there have been so many adaptations in all media, the big screen, TV and in theatre. The best adaptation, in my opinion, is the 2009 BBC TV series, with Romola Garai as Emma and Jonny Lee Miller as a dreamy Mr. Knightley.
  • (3/5)
    Emma is a fun read. I picked this book up because I had heard that it was the inspiration for the movie Clueless. Once you begin reading it, you see the parallels immediately. A smart, sassy novel.
  • (3/5)
    Andermaal is het hoofdthema: misleiding, niets is wat het lijkt. Andermaal happy end. De hoofdfiguur Emma is eigenlijk niet echt sympathiek, eerder meelijwekkend.Wel weer mooi societyportret en vooral enorme psychologische diepgang (in dit opzicht is Austen zelfs een voorloper van Dostojevski). Vlotte dialogen afgewisseld met beschrijving en introspectie. Vormelijk toch wel minder dan P&P, met soms langdradige stukken.
  • (1/5)
    It didn't stand up to rereading. Unlikeable characters leading vapid lives.
  • (3/5)
    This started off quite well, and the constant misunderstandings by Emma Woodhouse of the romantic intentions of others quite comical. However, I found too many of the characters difficult to distinguish in my mind (my favourite was probably Emma's hapless, hypochondriac father), and they lacked the colourful nature of the more eclectic cast of characters in Mansfield Park. So it was a bit of a struggle in places.
  • (4/5)
    Nadia May does a marvelous narration for this classic. While it is not my favorite Austen, it is still a wonderful book.
  • (5/5)
    Emma Woodhouse is one of Jane Austen's most infuriating heroines. She is rich, spoiled, and as prone to meddling in the lives of others as she is to neglecting her own self-improvement. She should be insufferable, and the fact that she is not is a credit to Austen's clear-eyed ability to create three-dimensional characters, put them into situations where they do not shine, and then redeem them in the end.Really, Emma's problem is that there is no one who is both her age and her social status in the small English country town where she lives with her widowed father, who is a study in self-centered spoiling himself. Even as she is doing things that make the reader want to slap her, Austen gives us insight into Emma's thoughts that show she is not wholly unaware of where her faults lie and her sincere desire to overcome them, even if she isn't quite sure how to accomplish that.Many years ago, I read a biography of Rex Stout, who created the ineffable private detectives Nero Wolfe and Archie Goodwin. When biographer John McAleer asked Rex in the final days of his life what Wolfe was doing at that moment, Rex said, "He's re-reading Emma ." Indeed, Stout had that famous misogynist detective declare in more than one book that Austen was his favorite writer, and Emma the perfect novel. I wouldn't call it perfect, and I'm not sure it's even my favorite Austen, but I thoroughly enjoyed reading it.
  • (4/5)
    Love it, love it, love it!
  • (5/5)
    Emma by Jane Austen; (4 1/2*)Austen's prediction that her Emma was not a person many people would like certainly came to fruition. In point of fact Emma is one of the least likable characters in British literature. She comes across as a snob. She is a rich and manipulative character whom I found to be rather despicable throughout the novel. But for this reader, Emma came to be a character I loved to hate, so to speak. The novel is quite funny and the characterizations I found to be well rounded, not flat, and I could easily identify with most all of them. There were the irritating Bates', the hypochondriac Father, the dashing, the elegant neighbor & brother in law, the accomplished Jane Fairfax of whom Emma is fiercely jealous, and the fawning lower class friend Emma wants to 'match up' with someone of a higher class.The comic exchanges between characters, the complexity of the plot and the witty conversations/bickerings between the characters makes reading Emma a great deal of fun indeed. The reader has no need to like or agree with Emma in order to enjoy this great piece of literature. If not for Jane Austen's brilliant use of the English language, which pulls the reader right in and holds one captive for the duration, I could have never gotten through this book with so much joy and entertainment.But it is exactly the author's control of language which makes the novel the masterpiece it is and why we still enjoy it some 200 years later. Emma is filled with complexity and interesting, funny interludes. The dialogue between the characters is quite brilliant. Emma is highly enjoyable to read and to re-read. I highly recommend this novel.
  • (4/5)
    Emma is a lively young girl who has taken on match making but finds that she's not quite a good at it as she supposes when it backfires on her. The characters are memorable and Jane Austen is expert at social satire and highlighting the customs and manners of the times. The move Clueless is based on this book.
  • (3/5)
    Andermaal is het hoofdthema: misleiding, niets is wat het lijkt. Andermaal happy end. De hoofdfiguur Emma is eigenlijk niet echt sympathiek, eerder meelijwekkend.Wel weer mooi societyportret en vooral enorme psychologische diepgang (in dit opzicht is Austen zelfs een voorloper van Dostojevski). Vlotte dialogen afgewisseld met beschrijving en introspectie. Vormelijk toch wel minder dan P&P, met soms langdradige stukken.
  • (2/5)
    Jane Austen threw all the most irritating people she could imagine (I hope she didn't actually know them!) together into a disfunctional community. I'll stick to the books of hers that I really enjoy from now on. This one doesn't do it for me.
  • (3/5)
    I can say that I'm very glad to have finished this book. Before reading it, I've heard praises of it being 'Jane's best work' and so I guess I should be forgiven if I began reading it with extremely high hopes, being a fan of Jane's work.
    However, I have to admit that I was a bit disappointed. Sure, I sort of had a liking to Mr Knightley, (as probably was to be expected), but I felt that the storyline dragged on a bit. Though I must say I prefer Emma to Wuthering Heights due to the surprises towards the end.
    On a more personal note, (*RANT ALERT*) I think I've finally found why I like classics so much. Other than the obvious of the men being gentlemen, I think it's the fact that courtship was so simple back then. When you fall in love with someone, you pursued them. If affections were returned, the next step would be to plan marriage; and cheating was an abomination. In a world and time where cheating (not just physically, but mentally and emotionally) is so common that it's considered 'normal' today, I find solace in classics. Or maybe I'm just a bitter bitch because I get cheated on so often for being too nice and too understanding. Ah well.
  • (4/5)
    I think this was the first Jane Austen book that I have read. I had no idea what the story was going to be about before reading but I really enjoyed it. It was interesting to read about a match maker who has been setting up her friends. Emma reminded me of someone I could have known in my real life. She's not perfect although she thinks we has a great knack for setting people up. I thought it was interesting how she ended up getting married herself. I didn't really see her as a good match for her future husband. It seems like that part of the story wasn't planned out before the book started to be written. But all in all, I did enjoy this book and would love to read more by this author.
  • (3/5)
    Emma is a fun read. I picked this book up because I had heard that it was the inspiration for the movie Clueless. Once you begin reading it, you see the parallels immediately. A smart, sassy novel.
  • (5/5)
    The fourth, longest and last of Jane Austen's books to appear in print during her lifetime, Emma is considered a classic romantic comedy and was first published in 1816. Written almost 200 year ago, it's inevitable that the dialogue may feel a bit stilted at times. However, this adds dimension and depth to the story which focuses on 19th century social hierarchies and the interaction between various social classes. Miss Emma Woodhouse is a shining example of a 19th century socialite. Beautiful, clever and wealthy, she fancies herself a master-matchmaker and sets in motion a laundry list of schemes to pair off the Highbury residents. Convinced a make-over would elevate her new friend Harriet's social standing and thus her marriage potential, Emma, fueled by her feeling of superiority, plotted and planned, all to no avail. Failing to realize the extent of her shortcomings and the consequences of such hurtful behavior, Emma was finally confronted by Mr. Knightley. Afterwards, embarrassed and ashamed, she reevaluated her life and began to make amends, in hopes of becoming a better person. Emma is a beautifully written, classic, laced with wit and sarcasm. Through a vastly differing cast of characters, each delightfully inspiring in his or her own way, Austen vividly captured the heart of a community. Everything is neatly tied up at the conclusion, as things literally come full circle...ending much the way it began.A sublte, yet very significant messege is hidden just below the surface--the beginning and the ending are just definitive points in the journey, in between is where we write our definition of happiness. There's a depth and sincere honesty written into the very fabric of this story- that must be recognized to fully appreciate the artistic genius of Jane Austen. Like a vintage automobile, Emma is a slow, leisurely read, perfect for a lazy Sunday afternoon.
  • (4/5)
    Either times have changed, or Jane Austen was merely being coy when she described Emma Woodhouse as 'a heroine whom no-one but myself will much like'. She is perfectly delightful, more so for being 'faultless in spite of all her faults', and Mr Knightley is another inspiring leading man (surely her heroes, and not the heroines, are the secret of the author's success?) I don't dislike Emma, I want to *be* her!My eyes are finally opened to the appeal of Jane Austen's books, after years of holding out against her 'white frocks and weddings' romances. Granted, she only ever wrote six novels, and most of them share the same plot devices, but her subtle sarcasm and skilful narration make reading her limited oeuvre an education and a pleasure. Some of her sentences take a bit of unpicking, like her negative sentence construction - writing 'she could not think it so very impossible that the Churchills might not allow their nephew to remain a day beyond his fortnight' instead of 'she knew Frank's aunt would want him back in Yorkshire', for instance - but the careful use of formal language only adds to the necessary attention due to Austen's prose. But I know the story, from the film and the recent miniseries, and so unlike Frank Churchill, my stay in Highbury was permitted to be leisurely.Aside from Emma and Mr Knightley, and the fun of playing the omniscient reader by picking up on clues that the eponymous heroine herself is oblivious to, the real luxury of reading 'Emma' for me comes from the sense of community that Jane Austen works so well into her books. Like Mr Woodhouse, by the end of the novel I was wishing that nothing would change - the Woodhouses at Hartfield, with Mr Knightley walking the mile from Donwell to visit, and familiar faces such as Mr and Mrs Weston at Randalls and Miss Bates with her inane chatter in Highbury. All right, I could live without Miss Bates. Reading 'Emma', however, is both comforting and reassuring, like a carefree summer's day or sitting by the fire when it's snowing outside (and both scenes are pictured beautifully within). The perfect antidote to a slow Sunday afternoon, or travelling on public transport!
  • (4/5)
    Superb description of victorian times in which women had to marry to make for good. I love Austin descriptions and her views
  • (4/5)
    Emma was delightful. I enjoyed it very much. Emma is strong willed and loves to play match maker. Everything she does ends in disaster, and it's hilarious. Poor Harriet and Mr. Knightly, Emma really does make a mess of things. However, in typical Austen fashion things work out in the end.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed reading this a whole lot more than I expected to. The language is fantastic, certain bits of dialogue strike me as very original (example: "the extent of your admiration may take you by surprise" is so much more artfully coy than "are you in love with her?"), and the characters are well drawn. But I probably would have overlooked reading this classic, as I've been steering clear of the romances, were it not for "The Rhetoric of Fiction" by Wayne C. Booth. In his study of narrative as rhetoric, he devoted a full chapter to an analysis of "Emma" as a fantastic example of well-employed narrative strategy being used to resolve the challenges of an unsympathetic lead. After that, I had to see it for myself.Jane Austen sets up what appears on the surface to be an easily told story: a wealthy young woman suffers from snobbishness, then learns the error of her ways. The trouble being, most readers aren't predisposed to like a snob, so what to do? By telling the story from Emma's viewpoint, we get inside her head and find out she's not really a bad person despite her singular downfall. Told from any other character's perspective, we'd hardly be as likely to realize this and wish her well.This solution produces another problem: how to ensure the reader is aware of Emma's fault and can then monitor its being addressed? The author uses two methods: distant narration at the beginning, in which the narrator blatantly states (telling, not showing! to good effect) Emma's weakness before subtly handing the narrative over to Emma herself. From that point on, the author employs humour to make the progression in her character entertaining.Then it's the humour itself that presents a challenge. We might be in danger of laughing at Emma vindictively, when her false perceptions fail her. Happily the humour is so carefully crafted and presented that, together with our sympathy being won, we are able to enjoy Emma's misperceptions and their results in a less malicious way.These points are all Mr. Booth's and I doubt I'd have arrived at them independently. I definitely would not have assumed them in advance. A large part of what made this book enjoyable derived from my prior understanding of its strategic crafting. Whether Jane Austen consciously gave it thought or no, she used the only narrative approach that would have succeeded. She conveyed Emma's weakness through a positive use of telling, then used humour to superior effect so that the novel is comedic without being farcical. This insight made it a joy to read. Additionally, I was even glad to already know how the book ended (normally I hate spoilers, I'll give none here), because I could appreciate the extra layers of dramatic irony that otherwise require a second read to capture.As the introduction to my edition says, "Emma" is a novel that can be read too easily, and in which nothing of much consequence appears to happen on the surface. It would have been in keeping with my normal tastes to declare "boring!" and grant 3.5 stars instead of five. Defending the novel now against that alternative self, I'd point to the intervening two hundred years since its publication and how easily I can fall prey to reading with 21st century eyes. That and, when I'm merely reading for pleasure sometimes the craft goes over my head. If you are prone to making the same errors, I recommend some pre-reading about this novel before jumping in because the difference it makes is remarkable.
  • (5/5)
    Of all of Austen's books I've read, this one is lightest in tone and the most comedic. No one comes close to death or is disastrously spirited away. The closest thing to a tragedy is being snubbed at a dance. I don't remember liking Emma as a character much at first, but she slowly won me over, and she has one of the more interesting arcs of any of Austen's characters. All Austen protagonists grow, but I think she arguably travels the farthest as a result of her comeuppance. One delivered as a result not of her own humiliation but because of words of reproach that make her aware of having hurt someone else. I'm not sure ultimately what to make of her drifting away from Harriet Smith. I think in the end there's still plenty of social snobbery in Emma, and I'm not sure if Austen would in any case disapprove given the class roles of her time. (Although it does seem Mr Knightly, the hero of the tale has no problem having a mere farmer as a friend.) Austen makes you wonder about her characters even after you close the book because she creates a whole community within Emma. And so many of the people within it, like the Eltons, are great comedic characters. Like so many of Austen's novels, Emma isn't a museum piece but a truly fun read with delicious satiric touches.
  • (3/5)
    The marriage game again, but done in a more playful style. I liked the way the story was structured - you could see what was going to happen, but it was fun watching it unfold.