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Fever - Schatten der Vergangenheit (Gekürzte Fassung)

Fever - Schatten der Vergangenheit (Gekürzte Fassung)

Geschrieben von Douglas Preston

Erzählt von Detlef Bierstedt


Fever - Schatten der Vergangenheit (Gekürzte Fassung)

Geschrieben von Douglas Preston

Erzählt von Detlef Bierstedt

Bewertungen:
3.5/5 (13 Bewertungen)
Länge:
7 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Aug 23, 2012
ISBN:
9783839810705
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Special Agent Pendergast kehrt auf den Stammsitz seiner Familie zurück. Hier erwarten ihn viele sorgsam verdrängte Erinnerungen - auch die an seine Frau, die vor zwölf Jahren bei einem schrecklichen Unfall umgekommen ist. Doch nun findet Pendergast Hinweise, dass Helen in Wahrheit das Opfer eines heimtückischen Mordes wurde. Gemeinsam mit seinem besten Freund D'Agosta beginnt er zu ermitteln und muss bald erkennen, dass Helen ein Doppelleben geführt hat. Aber warum musste Helen sterben? Und was hat dies alles mit einem Künstler aus dem 19. Jahrhundert zu tun, von dem sie geradezu besessen war, einem Genie, das unter einer rätselhaften Fieberkrankheit litt? Nur eins steht fest: Helen hat ein Geheimnis mit ins Grab genommen - und es gibt immer noch jemanden, der bereit ist, dafür über Leichen zu gehen...
Freigegeben:
Aug 23, 2012
ISBN:
9783839810705
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

Douglas Preston writes about archaeology for the New Yorker and National Geographic magazines, as well as novels and nonfiction works (such as The Lost City of the Monkey God). With Lincoln Child, he writes international #1 bestselling thrillers, including the Agent Pendergast adventures.


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Was die anderen über Fever - Schatten der Vergangenheit (Gekürzte Fassung) denken

3.6
13 Bewertungen / 58 Rezensionen
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  • (5/5)
    Another great read in the Pendergast series. I especially loved the tie-in of Audubon and his beautiful paintings. While some of these books aren't always a 5-star read, they're still incredibly enjoyable and I always find myself looking to grab the next one of the series at Barnes & Noble when it gets released each year. Hats off to Pendergast and all of his investigations.
  • (2/5)
    It pains me to say this but I might be dine with the series. This book was in trouble from the start. I didn't even buy the mystery. I have struggled through the last few books. I will probably give it one more but it had better be good.
  • (4/5)
    Entertraining, unbelievable.
  • (5/5)
    I love the Pendergast novels, and this was one of the more exciting ones I've read. Loved it!
  • (4/5)
    Pendergast & D"Agnosto try to find who & why P's wife was killed 12 years earlier by a lion.
  • (5/5)
    Preston and Child take us on another wild ride with Special Pendergast and Officer D'Agosta. Fever Dream moves beyond the last few connected novel and stands (mostly) on it's own. In a flashback we see Pendergast's wife killed and then move forward to 12 years to when he discovers it was murder. Fast paced, breathless and never disappointing, Fever Dream leaves just enough open loops to make you want the next book.
  • (5/5)
    I love the Pendergast books. Especially the ones where we learn about Pendergast or his past. As far as in the series, this is one of the better ones. The only problem is that I figured things out a little early and the book lagged when I had to wait for the characters to catch up. Otherwise it was brilliant.
  • (4/5)
    This tenth Pendergast is great! Loved the Louisiana setting. A bit more is revealed about the lovely but mysterious Constance Greene. Looking forward to 11 and 12 in this fascinating series.
  • (3/5)
    Agent Prenderast is not as compelling in this story as previous books.
  • (4/5)
    As usual, the book was fantastic. I love the fact that we get to see more of Special Agent Pendergast's life history in this book. The book promess a sequel that I can't wait to read. We follow S.A. Pendergast as he investigate his wife's death more than twelve years ago after realizing she had been murdered. As he uncovers secrets and lies, he wonders who really was Helen Esterhazy Pendergast.
  • (4/5)
    Special Agent Aloysius Pendergast discovers that the death of his wife Helen 12 years earlier by a lion attack was not an accident, but an elaborate murder. He immediately calls on his best friend Lt. Vincent D'Agosta to take a leave of absence from the NYPD to help him solve the crime. Captain Laura Hayward, D'Agosta's girlfriend, helps out a lot with this case. As smart as she is, I was a little irritated that the authors chose to make her the dimwit in several situations to show off Pendergast's intelligence and ability to manipulate. Constance Greene makes a small appearance in the novel, returning from Australia after having a vision that Pendergast will need her help. However, on the way back to the U.S., she is accused of throwing her infant child overboard and is held on murder charges.Overall the novel was great, but there were a couple of places where it was weak and I was thinking, 'Really?' For example, when Helen Pendergast discovers that some residents of a small town were killed by the accidental release of some experimental viruses, she threatens to alert the authorities as soon as she gets back from her vacation in Africa. Huh?The novel ends with a cliffhanger, but I'm not going to spoil it. If you like the other Pendergast novels, you will like this one as well.
  • (4/5)
    Loved this book! I've always liked Agent Pendergast and appreciated his rather unique investigative approach, but this is probably the best Pendergast installment so far.12 years after the loss of his wife, Pendergast discovers that the lion attack that killed her while on safari in Africa was not an accident but a planned murder.The book is extremely well paced and very difficult to put down. I heartily recommend this book!
  • (5/5)
    I don't think I'll ever get tired of reading about Special Agent Aloysius X.L. Pendergast's adventures, and I pray Preston and Child never get tired of inventing them. Fever Dream was every bit the summer escapism read I had hoped for. Although, I suppose, being transported to the sun-baked African bush, and the humid, cicada infested swamps of Louisiana was not, strictly speaking, an escape from this year's long hot Mid-Western summer. But somehow, I forgot about the humidity and dewpoints, entranced, as always, by Pendergast's cool. A new Pendergast novel is one of the few books I buy in hardcover. I hate to wait. I'm about at the point where I want to go back to the beginning of the series and re-read them all. To attain a Trekkie-like knowledge of Pendergast. I keep waiting for a movie? But I'm not too hopeful that Hollywood will ever find a Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce to incarnate Pendergast and D'Agosta. I can't think of any celebrity actor who could capture his uniqueness. It would need to be an unknown way out of left field, someone original like Jim Parsons, who plays Dr. Sheldon Cooper on Big Bang Theory - but a touch more macho. But who knows? One can dream. In any event, this episode in the on-going saga, concerning the murder of Pendergast's wife Helen, was completely up to the usual standards for the series: a compelling mystery, great local color, interesting historic tidbits, and a continuity with the past novels. Plus it left some interesting threads in the story to be addressed in the next novel, which will likely open at a hunting range in Scotland. My bags are packed.
  • (5/5)
    This was provided for review by Hachette Book Group. There were so many things going on in this one I don't even know where to start... It was such a good book. I can truly say that I didn't see anything coming. The characters were pretty good. Being that this was an audio book I didn't get the same connection to the characters that I do when I read the book myself. But they were well developed characters none the less. Pendergast was an odd person, and that's putting it lightly. I liked Hayward the most I think. She seemed to be the most level-headed.The story itself was fantastic. Right from the beginning the action starts and it doesn't really let up. Like I said it wasn't at all predictable. There were so many twists to the story that I was shocked by many of them. The twists weren't cheesy either. Each of them really added something to the story. It wasn't like they added a twist just for the sake of adding a twist. The narrator was great. Rene Auberjonois did a great job with this one. I loved his voice, even when I used to watch Deep Space Nine I always liked his character, his voice was soothing then. Again he is fairly well known, but I didn't "see" his known characters while he was reading. Again I LOVED this one. Although it was a little long I was kept drawn into the story the whole way!
  • (5/5)
    Wow, absolutely GREAT book! I mostly read romance books, but I also really enjoy suspense thrillers. Fever Dream took me on a winding trail of suspense and intrigue. The twists and turns in this story were not expected and I marvel at the well thought out detail. I look forward to the "Gideon Crew" series coming in 2011.
  • (2/5)
    I didn't love this book. I listened to an audio version and one of the distractions was the failure of the producers to make sure the reader had the local pronuciations of words. Place names like picayune, bellechaise, New madrid, and dauphin were murdered. This however is a trifling issue one only a native of New orleans and resident of MO would pick out.The book reads like a first draft. The mystery doesn't unfold we are told the solution. Once Pendergast proclaims it....it's not clear why he doesn't solve it earlier in the book as he didn't have much more information at that than he did 100 pages earlier. I found Pendergast totally unbelievable. Why doesn't he ever have to report to the FBI? Of what use was D'Agosto? The beginning of the book is full of strands that don't go anywhere...the death of the crazy aunt, Helen's family having to leave their home in Massachusetts under mysterious circumstances,Monica Green. We aren't told that Hayward is a Louisiana native until the second half of the book, which is strange as so much is made of Pendergast's Louisiana background.I understand that this is part of a series, perhaps I picked one of the weakest to listen to first.
  • (2/5)
    I have enjoyed earlier books in the Pendergast series, but this one was so phoned in that I had the strong impression that I had read it before. If it were a movie, I would say that it was hammy and overacted. There were so many portentious and gloomy moments that it seemed like an old black and white horror/cliffhanger. I had to give up!!
  • (5/5)
    I think this is one of Preston & Child's best Agent Pendergast episodes. It's all here, mystery, suspense, good guys, bad guys, lots of action in different locations. The mysterious Contance: did she or did she not drown her baby? Not to give too much away but Preston & Child are the only authors I don't mind using cliff hangers...I couldn't put it down, I'll leave it at that.
  • (4/5)
    I loved this book when I started reading it. I really liked how more of Pendergast's history was fleshed out. However, when I was finished reading, I was left with the feeling that this book was merely written so a forthcoming book could address the unfinished storylines. Well worth reading for a fan of the series.
  • (5/5)
    great read. Can't put it down kind of book. Characters well developed and story is written with tantalizing cliffhangers.
  • (4/5)
    This Pendergast novel was a bit slower at first, but picked up about 2/3 of the way through. There's little I can tell you of the novel, as pretty much anything I do say will give something away. As usual, Pendergast, D'Agosta, and Laura Hayward are involved. I do think our authors have run out of some of the "coolness" Pendergast has shown early on. He's not as amazing slick or unique when we were first discovering him in the early books. But still, he's interesting enough to keep you interested. If you're a Preston/Child fan, you'll enjoy this read. Just maybe not as much as earlier Pendergast novels.
  • (4/5)
    Special Agent Pendergast, a fairly fascinating regular character in these books, has just discovered that the presumed accidental death of his wife in Africa 12 years ago was, in fact, murder. He enlists Lt. Vincent D'Agosta to help him in a manhunt that takes him to Africa in back, and involves the life and work of John James Audubon. Along the way Pendergast learns that he did not know his wife as well as he had thought, and the conclusion leaves a loose end that seems sure to pop up in a subsequent book. Quite good techno-thriller suspense, with well-drawn regular characters.
  • (4/5)
    An absorbing read, perhaps one of the best in the Pendergast series. This one focuses on the death, years ago, of Aloysius Pendergast's wife Helen during a trip to Africa. Lt. Vincent D'Agosta is, of course, along for the ride as Pendergast begins to suspect that something about his wife's long ago death isn't as simple as he has believed for the past 12 years. This is a thrilling addition to the series with a lot of background on the mysterious Pendergast. Anyone who has enjoyed the series will love this book.
  • (4/5)
    Review in progress. Just finished the book loved it....
  • (4/5)
    Great read. Who knew Angent P had been married. This book takes us on the journey of their life together and what happened to her. Very interesting.
  • (5/5)
    YEAH! SA Pendergast kicking butt and taking names! If you're a fan - this is just fabulous. If you're not a fan - you will be.
  • (4/5)
    I'm glad to see that the Agent Pendergast books seem to be getting back on track. This was another enjoyable story in the series. I loved that we get to see more of Pendergast's past and it was kind of strange to think of him as being married at some point. I wish we could have seen more of the interaction between he and his wife but it still gave him a more human side as he tried to figure out why his wife was murdered. I'm glad that D'Agosta also played a large part in this story as it's always fun to see the contrast between Pendergast's and D'Agosta's methods. Then in the end we also see D'Agosta's girlfriend Captain Hayward get involved which is an even greater contrast. There are some great confrontations going on through out the book that made me laugh.The only part I did not like is that there is a small side story regarding Pendergast's ward, Constance. I never really enjoyed that story line and it did not really fit at all in this story so I just found it irritating. Still this is another great book for all you Agent Pendergast lovers out there!As a little bonus the authors mention a new character they are introducing in their next book. While I'm excited to see how this new character turns out the end of Fever Dream leaves you hanging a bit and I really cannot wait to find out what happens next.
  • (4/5)
    This was the first Pendergast novel that I wasn't enchanted with right from the get go. I got about 50 pages into it and had to put it down for a few days before I could finish it. The first chapters seemed stilted, and the flashback to Pendergast's last days with his wife were awkward and came across as very Nick and Nora - all cocktails and drollness.Preston and Child announced that they are starting a new series with a new character, and it made me wonder if they are tired of poor old A.X.L.P. This book seemed disjointed and I was more aware of two different styles of writing in this novel than the others.The first half of the novel was kind of blase. D'Agosta was litte more than Pendergast's faithful companion, and the interaction between them bordered on Pendergast telling D'Agosta to "Fetch!", "Stay", and "Good boy!"The novel did pick up in the second half after Pendergast hooked up with NYPD Captain Laura Hayward. She is a by-the-book kinda gal, and strong enough of a character to stand up to Pendergast's less than orthodox police methodology. Pendergast as a quirky, offbeat character seems to work best when he has a strong foil to contrast against, as in his interaction with goth chick Corrie Swanson in Still Life with Crows.I liked their interaction so much that I hope to see more of it in coming novels. It redeemed the book for me, although I do wish that Laura hadn't been so helpless at the end of the novel. I guess I've been reading too many Anita Blake novels lately. I wanted Laura to pull a knife from a wrist sheath and rescue the day.So I ended up liking the book, and am looking forward to the next one.
  • (2/5)
    I've been reading the Pendergast series since it came out and became quite a fan of the characters and the fictional world. Until this one.It is as if the authors started with a great idea, wrote a great plot synopsis, and then left for the beach. The first few chapters (some only a page or a few pages each) create a compelling twist on the ongoing saga around FBI agent Pendergast, who learns that his lovely wife wasn't as lovely has he always thought and that her death was a carefully staged event. As usual the authors added some nice historical detail revolving around the famous natural history illustrator: Audobon, and they do handle that part of the material very carefully and appropriately. After we find out almost exactly in the middle of the book how the plot is stuck together, we are left with a car chases, out of character posturing by all of the cast and a carelessly written side-plot revolving around the mysterious relative of our Special Agent: Constance Green.Usually when I read a Pendergast novel I can't quite put my finger on where they get their corroborative detail, as in how do they know what trees grow in Africa, or what kinds of flowers you can find in the deep jungle. That's what keeps my interest going a lot of the time when the plot thins and the characters fall apart. With this novel the suspension of disbelief falls apart because every detail is carefully chosen and randomly placed in the text. When I read about the choir of loud cicadas in Africa they still had me, but when I read about the same choir of loud cicadas in New Orleans they lost me. Even though these insects appear in both places apparently, it just felt contrived and lazy.It was almost as if the authors had their minds set on a new detective series and quickly rattled out a new novel in their successful series. I therefor wasn't surprised to see a message at the end of the book by the Preston and Child that we can expect a brand new detective series soon with a new cast and a new fictional world. Too bad, they could have made something of the one they already had.
  • (3/5)
    Twelve years ago, Special Agent Pendergast's wife was killed by a man-eating lion. Now Pendergast finds evidence that it was actually murder. Determined to track down his wife's killer, he and Lieutenant D'Agosta chase clues from Louisiana and Africa to Florida and Maine. There is lots of running around, plus unconventional investigative techniques, surprising discoveries, and atmospheric eccentrics. There is also a rather pointless subplot with Pendergast's ward, Constance Greene. The case is resolved, mostly, although there's a big loose end, or as the author's would probably prefer, room for a sequel.If you find Pendergast interesting rather than enjoying, you'll probably like this one a lot more than I did.