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Verstand und Gefühl - Sonderedition (Ungekürzte Fassung)

Verstand und Gefühl - Sonderedition (Ungekürzte Fassung)

Geschrieben von Jane Austen

Erzählt von Eva Mattes


Verstand und Gefühl - Sonderedition (Ungekürzte Fassung)

Geschrieben von Jane Austen

Erzählt von Eva Mattes

Bewertungen:
3.5/5 (60 Bewertungen)
Länge:
12 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Aug 23, 2012
ISBN:
9783839890110
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Elinor und Marianne Dashwood sind so verschieden, wie zwei Schwestern nur sein können: Während die eine diszipliniert und vernünftig ist, handelt die andere emotional und impulsiv. Dennoch verbindet beide das scheinbar ausweglose Schicksal, sich im England des achtzehnten Jahrhunderts den gesellschaftlichen Zwängen unterwerfen und auf ihre große Liebe verzichten zu müssen..
Freigegeben:
Aug 23, 2012
ISBN:
9783839890110
Format:
Hörbuch


Über den Autor

Born in 1775, Jane Austen published four of her six novels anonymously. Her work was not widely read until the late nineteenth century, and her fame grew from then on. Known for her wit and sharp insight into social conventions, her novels about love, relationships, and society are more popular year after year. She has earned a place in history as one of the most cherished writers of English literature.


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3.7
60 Bewertungen / 218 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (2/5)
    Review of the Audible Audio edition narrated by Rosamund PikeI'm not the audience for Jane Austen, but as this was offered in an Audible Daily Deal it was an easy pick to cross off my 1001 Books list and to try to hear what all the fuss is about.This isn't an ideal book for long travel commutes as I found my mind wandering constantly and it would only snap back to attention when Pike affected an especially entertaining upper-class voice for Mrs. Jennings or during the drama of the confrontations between Elinor and Willoughby. The scoundrel Willoughby was probably the only character of any dramatic interest.One main distraction was my constantly thinking about how these people knew each other's incomes on an annual basis? It seemed like a regular refrain throughout but the source of the information is never discussed. It is almost as if there was some sort of public domain registry for this sort of information. I began to wonder if there is any sort of annotated Jane Austen that explains these sorts of cultural nuances that will become even more inexplicable as the years pass.These are only reactions based on listening to an audio version under less than ideal circumstances. I should still try to give it a read in hardcopy format.
  • (5/5)
    Two sisters find love and are heartbroken by the lies and deciet that are made. Society forbids them to marry above while another is engaged.
  • (4/5)
    The quiet pleasure of a rereading of a well-known work.
  • (4/5)
    With Jane Austen, I think there’s always a lot that I don’t understand but that hasn’t stopped me from enjoying her books.Unlike when I read Pride and Prejudice, I had no idea what happened in Sense and Sensibility or even what it was about. I’m glad this was the case – knowing that happy endings weren’t assured for the characters made it more suspenseful.“Suspenseful?” I hear you say, “How can a book about the marriage prospects of two Regency era women be suspenseful?”The answer: It’s all about the characters. Jane Austen does characters fabulously. Marianne and Elinor Dashwood, the two sisters at the heart of the novel, are fully developed characters who could walk right off the page. And what’s more, they’re likable.I became deeply involved in these characters lives even if their concerns and problems are so utterly different from my life in the 21st century.Oh, and did I mention that Jane Austen’s funny? It’s a subtle sort of wit that’s more likely to make you grin than laugh out loud, but it makes her books wonderfully enjoyable.I’m not going to bother recommending Sense and Sensibility to anyone in particular; chances are, if you live in the Western world, you’re bound to read Jane Austen at some point in your education.Originally posted on The Illustrated Page.
  • (4/5)
    Originally titled Elinor and Marianne, in a way the book was still named after it’s two main characters. Elinor is eminently sensible, always putting her own feelings second to looking out for her mother and sister. Elinor is the exact opposite, entirely focused on her own sensibility and feelings with a complete lack of concern for the practical. Despite their dissimilarity, both sisters will face similar challenges as they navigate society trying to find love.

    This was a reread for me and the first thing I noticed was that I didn’t remember just how funny Jane Austen can be. The humor is very dry and understated, but I thought that made it even better. She rarely outright tells you anything about a character, instead giving you snapshots of their lives that show their personality. As one of the critics quoted in the book pointed out, although the book isn’t overly predictable, the characters always act self-consistently enough that their actions don’t surprise you.

    Although I personally relate much more to Elinor than to Marianne, I liked that the two heroines were so different. It added interest and should give everyone a character to empathize with. The plot was strangely engaging. Events move fairly slowly and what happens is all gossip and romance; not a description that I would expect for such an enthralling book! Despite the apparently unexciting contents, I couldn’t put the book down and always wanted to know what happened next.

    In addition to liking the story, I also liked the edition I picked up. It was a Barnes & Noble classics edition and it included the best extras. The introduction was less spoiler-y than many but still thought-provoking. I also liked that at the end of the book there was some extra discussion, some book club discussion questions, and a few quotes from critics across the ages. It gave some great context to the story and I’ll definitely be picking up more classics from this series.

    This review first published on Doing Dewey.
  • (4/5)
    3.75 stars. This feels like a trial-run for later books.
  • (5/5)
    Love this book! The quartet of Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility, Emma, and Persuasion are up there with my all-time favourite books of any age or genre. And the movie was good too, although I always find Emma Thompson in a young romantic role quite jarring - she always looks too old for the part (here a 36 year old playing a 19 year old).
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed reading about the romantic entanglements of the two sisters. I also enjoyed reading about their interactions with other characters. But, I mostly enjoyed reading about the relationship between the two sisters. They stuck by each other no matter what, and I enjoyed their story.
  • (4/5)
    Best for: Anyone interested in getting swept up in a bit of period drama.In a nutshell: Two sisters deal with the loss of their father and the change in lifestyle that follows, while trying to sort out their love lives.Worth quoting:“I am afraid that the pleasantness of an employment does not always evince its propriety.”Why I chose it: The cover, honestly. This lovely cloth cover drew my attention in a bookshop a few weeks ago, and I figured why not finally pick it up.Review:The book was originally published over 200 years ago, but just the same … SPOILERS!I claim on Good Reads to have read Pride and Prejudice, but I don’t think I have (odd, I know, and I’ll be correcting that). The cover of the film version of Sense and Sensibility has flashed on Netflix as I’ve skimmed through options over the years, but I’ve never watched it (until now - it’s playing as I write this review*). I share that only to say that because of that, I had Emma Thompson in my mind as I read Elinor, and Kate Winslet as I read Marianne. But I didn’t know the rest of the cast, so luckily my imagination was able to fill in the rest of the characters.It took me a little bit to get into this; I don’t read fiction often, and I read fiction from the 19th century even less often, so the writing took me some time to adjust to. That said, by about fifty pages in, I was engrossed. Unfortunately, because I wasn’t entirely understanding what I was reading (beyond picking up that Franny Dashwood is a conniving snot and her husband is a wimp), the whole Edward-Elinor pairing completely slipped my mind. When he was mentioned again much later on (as his engagement is revealed by Lucy), I was confused why Elinor would even care. So that’s a big whoops on my part.I did enjoy that characters were developed and shown to be a bit more complex (not always, although often) than they originally seemed. That said … I don’t understand why anyone’s opinion should be moved by Willoughby’s big confession to Elinor when he thinks Marianne is dying. Like, I guess the fact that his wife dictated the shitty letter matters, but I didn’t see anything in what he said that changed anything. Did I just miss something? Or was that whole reveal meant to just endear us even more to Elinor and her willingness to find the good in people? It just seemed unnecessary to me.Overall, I’m glad I read it. Up next, per a friend’s suggestion, is Persuasion; after that I’ll go with Mansfield Park, and eventually work my way around to Pride and Prejudice.*The casting in this film is BRILLIANT. I actually squealed when I saw Gemma Jones was Elinor and Marianne’s mother. AND ALAN RICKMAN JUST SHOWED UP!
  • (4/5)
    I am thankful that I didn't pick this, Sense and Sensibility, as my first Jane Austen book, otherwise I might have never known the love that I have for Pride and Prejudice. While Sense and Sensibility is a splendid story about love and class, it contains the most annoying characters of all time. Honestly, I didn't care for a single one other than Elinor.
  • (4/5)
    If you're a fan of Lydia and Kitty from Pride and Prejudice, you'll probably enjoy this book. It was largely about silly little nits trying to get married. It was amusing, but not nearly as good as P&P.
  • (3/5)
    Vroeg werk van Austen. Nog vol onvolkomendheden: weinig actie, eerder confrontatie van personen, geen humor.De personages zijn eerder karikaturen, maar wel subliem, en een heel aantal van hen ondergaan een behoorlijke evolutie. Gevoelens staan centraal: tussen containment en spontaniteitMilieu: burgerlijk, bezit en vast inkomen zijn centrale referenties, alleen vriendschap en liefde als tegengif. Religie afwezig.
  • (4/5)
    I could never really get into Sense and Sensibility. It was difficult to read and took me a while to get into. However, in the end, I did enjoy the story and the characters. This was my first foray into Jane Austen.
  • (5/5)
    This is always one of my favorite book.
  • (5/5)
    I found myself disliking Marianne. She was a bit of a selfish brat.
  • (5/5)
    Sense and Sensibility was my first Jane Austen novel, for the simple reason that it leads off the one-volume edition of her works that I was able to snag for about 30 cents at a library booksale. I had no idea it would be the gateway to an immersive new world I had not previously imagined (and when I say immersive, I mean it; I finished this one-volume edition of Austen's six novels plus Lady Susan over the course of the following two weeks). The plot is well known and tells the story of the Dashwood family, a mother and three daughters left nearly destitute by the death of Mr. Dashwood and the laws that precluded their inheriting any significant portion of his fortune. The two elder Miss Dashwoods, Elinor and Marianne, must find a way to live in a world that afforded women very few options. The two sisters could not be more different: Elinor orders her life and behavior according to common sense, while Marianne is ruled by her sensibilities and emotions. Their adventures and misadventures in love and the world of fashion during the Regency is beautifully rendered, with layers of meaning and thought and humor under even the smallest interactions and conversations. I never knew someone could write like this. Pride and Prejudice seems the obligatory favorite of Austen's novels and I do love it very much, but Sense and Sensibility will always vie for first place in my Austenian affections. Imagine reading Austen with no background knowledge, no movie versions in your head, no knowing what the characters are going to do or where the plot is going to go. It was an amazing literary experience and one that cannot be manufactured. Five stars isn't enough to express my love for this novel. I will simply say: thank you, Jane Austen.
  • (5/5)
    Better than I expected!

    I am completely in love with the movie version. It is one of my all-time favorites and was worried that in reading the book, it would ruin the movie for me. This was not the case at all.

    While it was not exactly an easy read, it was not tedious as I assumed it would be. Even though the language is not as modern as I am used to, it wasn't so difficult that I found myself confused by what I was reading. I only had to look up a few words that I was unsure of their meaning/usage.

    The story itself is a beautiful one of love, family, relationships and propriety. The title makes so much sense now (duh)! This was just lovely and reading it not only made me love the movie all the more, it has given me confidence that I will enjoy other works by Ms. Austen, such as Emma, which may be next on my classics to-do list.
  • (5/5)
    I never did add this! This is one of my favorite's of Jane Austen's. Everyone loves P&P, but I think this one is just a strong a contender. I love the girls in this one, the dynamic relationship of the two opposite sisters and their struggles both against each other in small ways and with their situations. If the book itself is intimidating this is one I would highly recommend the adaptation of with Kate Winslet and Alan Rickman. I adore the movie and having recently just rewatched it while ill I have to say it's done the best so far for me of adapting a novel. It cut and trim in just the right way and does the story justice.
  • (5/5)
    I love Jane Austen! Highbrow soap - delicious
  • (5/5)
    More Austen, still love it.
  • (3/5)
    Vroeg werk van Austen. Nog vol onvolkomendheden: weinig actie, eerder confrontatie van personen, geen humor.De personages zijn eerder karikaturen, maar wel subliem, en een heel aantal van hen ondergaan een behoorlijke evolutie. Gevoelens staan centraal: tussen containment en spontaniteitMilieu: burgerlijk, bezit en vast inkomen zijn centrale referenties, alleen vriendschap en liefde als tegengif. Religie afwezig.
  • (3/5)
    I'm sorry Jane, it's not you it's me. You're really very witty and you're great with the twists but blimey I find your prose a drag. It seems to push my eyes away, deliberately through sub-clause and deviation make me think about the commute and the shopping list and everything except the romantic intrigue actually being discussed. This is my noble confession, disinherit me if you must.
  • (4/5)
    you will find underlying themes of this title in the book.
  • (5/5)
    It's a bit off perfect, although rather close-- but not the equal of "Pride and Prejudice". The ending isn't quite clear until the last lines of the final chapter, but the resolution is rather tolerable than happy, I think. It's her first full-length novel, and in many ways I think she's still finding her way. The relations between her ladies and gentlemen aren't quite happy, as though she's unsure of how to bring them together. I also suspect in a way it's a transitional piece, between her youthful, looser, work, and her mature work, which is more settled on feelings. Because of this aging I suppose, there's a slight overcompensation, eventually, on behalf of rationality, rather than feeling, if that makes sense. Or more simply maybe, in the end she's a little hard on Marianne. It's still clearly Jane Austen's work, though, in the way she judges people's faults lightly, overlooking what is lacking when she can, in my opinion. In this way she allows the solid Colonel Brandon to acquit himself of merely being old and little else, and spares Willoughby from suffering overmuch from his youthful mistakes. Also Elinor's burdens are eventually lightened and her character shown in progressively more positive light.... and Marianne in spite of everything, may still have the prettier character. At any rate the relation between the sisters, like the relation between Jane and Elizabeth in "Pride and Prejudice", is well done. "Sense and Sensibility", though, is a less happy, less pretty novel, which nurtures romantic feeling less perfectly.... It's interesting to observe-- like Jane observes rather than judges, I think-- the difference between how fares the dull Mr. Collins in "Pride and Prejudice" with the dull Mr. Ferrars in "Sense and Sensibility". With Collins his dullness is as much made sport of as it is possible without being overly ungentle to do; Ferrars causes difficulty if anything because he cannot make up his mind. I suppose that Willoughby's passion casts a long shadow in this book, and much is looked well upon simply because it is safe-- more so than it can be for a truly pretty settlement of the people's feelings. But still I have to give it full marks based on how good it is compared to everything else except Jane Austen. Like "Let It Be" which is rather poor and underdeveloped for the Beatles, but better than most other bands at their height, "Sense and Sensibility" is a lesser work for the artist, but still a real work of art. (10/10)
  • (3/5)
    Descriptions and dialog dominate the beginning of this book. It isn't until a third of the way in that the story begins move along. It can take a while to sort out the many characters, especially as each character is alternately mentioned by their first and last names. With entire families involved in the storyline, I found it difficult at times to determine which character was speaking. Overall this is a story with depth and a great deal of introspection.
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite books of all time. I can linger on each sentence.
  • (5/5)
    It is also interesting to note both the helplessness and the extraordinary power of women in different circumstances.
  • (4/5)
    I love the way this woman writes.
  • (3/5)
    I feel like I should hate this book....but I don't. The beginning was extremely slow and monotonous but I was determined to get through it. I absolutely hated how it took so long to jus get to the point. Although I did like the story and the romance :)
  • (4/5)
    I thought I knew this book before I read it. I thought it was about two sisters - one practical and reserved, the other dramatic and passionate - trying to find husbands in a society riddled with gossip and insincerity. The story is really about how the sisters, who face strikingly similar obstacles, deal with their struggles in entirely different ways. It changes their relationship, how they see one another, and how they grow to interpret friendship and sincerity. The story lacked a dramatic flair I enjoyed in other of Austen's work, and at times it felt tedious. I enjoyed it, and I appreciate that it was so much more than I was expecting.