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Aufruhr in Oxford (gekürzte Fassung)

Aufruhr in Oxford (gekürzte Fassung)

Geschrieben von Dorothy L. Sayers

Erzählt von Doris Wolters


Aufruhr in Oxford (gekürzte Fassung)

Geschrieben von Dorothy L. Sayers

Erzählt von Doris Wolters

Bewertungen:
4/5 (28 Bewertungen)
Länge:
11 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Mar 3, 2014
ISBN:
9783899648652
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

In &Aufruhr in Oxford& ermitteln Lord Peter Wimsey und die von ihm umworbene Kriminalautorin Harriet Vane am Elite-College in Oxford. Schülerinnen und Lehrkräfte erhalten Drohbriefe. Eine von einem Messer durchbohrte Strohpuppe hängt an einem Dachbalken. Und Harriet Vane, die wegen einer Jahresfeier an ihrer alten Ausbildungsstätte weilt, entgeht nur knapp einem Mordanschlag. Wer steckt hinter diesen Taten? Und was ist das Motiv? Gemeinsam kommen Harriet und Lord Peter dem Geheimnis auf die Spur, und einander näher ... Doris Wolters - für Ihre Interpretationskunst mit dem Deutschen Hörbuchpreis ausgezeichnet - liest diesen Sayers-Roman so wie er es verdient: intelligent, humorvoll und very british.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Mar 3, 2014
ISBN:
9783899648652
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

Dorothy L. Sayers (1893–1957) was a British playwright, scholar, and acclaimed author of mysteries, best known for her books starring the gentleman sleuth Lord Peter Wimsey. While working as an advertising copywriter, Sayers began writing Whose Body? (1923), the first Wimsey mystery, followed by ten sequels and several short stories. Sayers set the Wimsey novels between the two World Wars, giving them a realistic tone by incorporating details from contemporary issues such as advertising, women’s education, and veterans’ health. Sayers also wrote theological essays and criticism during and after World War II, and in 1949 published the first volume of a translation of Dante’s Divine Comedy. Although she considered this translation to be her best work, it is for her elegantly constructed detective fiction that Sayers remains best remembered.


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Was die anderen über Aufruhr in Oxford (gekürzte Fassung) denken

3.8
28 Bewertungen / 77 Rezensionen
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  • (3/5)
    While being a loving (and lovely) portrait of Oxford and academic Life in the 30s. The mystery itself sadly falters somewhat, however. the plot never really gets going, and the pace slackens even more towards the ending. The whole thing feels rather directionless after a while, and the climax is underwhelming.In addition, there's a lot of talking heads, who comes of rather stiffly. The novel seems to want to be a novel about ideas - about academic loyalty, about a woman's place in society, about love and relationships and work, and about what to sacrifice for what. This doesn't really work, even if you give it leeway for being a product of it's time - the talking is endless en repetitive, comes of as a pedantic ticking of boxes on a list of points and counterpoints, rather than the spirited exchange of ideas between scholarly minds it tries to be.I love the Oxford bits to bits, and some of the passages are witty and insightful, but in the end it bare felt worth my time
  • (5/5)
    I simply love this book; I have had it in my collection since I was a teenager and come back to it again and again. As a detective story, a story of unfolding love balanced against the life of the mind, and an evocation of pre-War Oxford, it has few peers
  • (5/5)
    Gaudy Night, published in 1935, is billed as a Lord Peter Wimsey novel, but he barely makes an appearance in the first couple of hundred pages. His friend Harriet Vane is really the central character. In her early thirties, she returns to her old Oxford college for a celebration and ends up staying to investigate a mysterious series of events that start with poison pen-letters and become more destructive. An entertaining mystery with some interesting reflections on the academic life and whether it is of value, especially when compared with raising a family or manual labour.
  • (3/5)
    Can't remember the book but I had a three star rating down.
  • (3/5)
    A bit too much immersion in upper-class British academe for my tastes. After slogging through all the Latin and the jargon, I was feeling some class/education based resentment and irritation, just like the guilty party in the book.
  • (5/5)
    Absolutely sublime, first rate and a real treat. There is a mystery, a love story, and a picture of Oxford at a very interesting time in history. It was a delight to read, not just entertaining but an intellectual treat.
  • (5/5)
    I am rereading this right now for the millionth time. Always get something new from it --- right now, inspiration for a novel.
  • (2/5)
    I expected to like this book. I'd never read Dorothy Sayers, but can't think of why, I've read dozens of Agathas and other English mystery writers. And this book is always on favorites lists. The style of something written in Britain in the 30s is going to take a little bit of getting used to, so I blamed that for awhile until I realized that I was beginning to doze. It was awfully wordy and overlong for a typical mystery and I had trouble keeping the characters straight. Several scenes were nicely creepy and atmospheric, but I did feel like I was plodding by the time I finished it.
  • (5/5)
    From a very early age, I can remember my grandmother staying up late into the night, reading Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries. Much to my shame, it has taken me until now to read one, but once I did, I found myself reading until ungodly hours as well.Gaudy Night is the third mystery featuring Lord Peter Wimsey and his girlfriend, the mystery writer Harriet Vane, but it is entirely possible to read without knowledge of the other books. The large majority of the novel follows Harriet as she attempts to solve a mystery at her alma mater, Shrewsbury College in Oxford. Unlike most mystery novels, this one doesn't involve a murder (or, at least, a successful one). Instead, the mystery surrounds the identity of a "Poison Pen," who sends threatening letters to the female dons of the college and generally wreaks destruction around the quadrangles. Harriet takes on the case after she finds herself targeted during a reunion weekend (the titular Gaudy Night), staying in the college for the following year under the pretense of working on a piece on La Fanu. Only when things turn violent does Harriet call upon the debonair Lord Peter to help investigate the crimes.The novel is infused with a wonderfully strong sense of place, making the reader feel almost as if they know the Shrewsbury campus and its inhabitants. Set pieces with Harriet punting on the river or dining with the dons in the Hall enchant. Sayers has a wonderful eye for detail and has fully imagined this all-female college (which, in the introduction, she charmingly apologizes for constructing on the Balliol fields).To be fair, the mystery isn't the most exciting of all time, but things really perk up when Lord Peter arrives with his bon mots and sets off a more violent set of crimes. In some ways, Gaudy Night really succeeds more as a character study of the female dons and their students, who live in a world where they must decide between a intellectual career and a family. This sort of difficult choice remains familiar to career women today, and it is interesting to note how little things have changed in the last 75 years in this regard.There are many wonderful things to be discovered in Gaudy Night, from memorable characters like Lord Peter's overly privileged nephew Saint-George to the most amazingly egalitarian proposal scene of all time (it involves Harriet and Peter speaking Latin to each other).One word to the wise: Sayers uses the names of the female dons interchangeably with their titles, which can get awfully confusing. I found it helpful to make a list to keep track of who's who.
  • (5/5)
    My favourite Dorothy Sayers, one of my favourite books of all time. Each rereading I see something new. Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane resolve their differences against a backdrop of literature and learning and with the architecture and soul of Oxford University as a third major character. A treatise on love and integrity wrapped up in a mystery novel!
  • (5/5)
    I read all of the Dorothy Sayers mysteries years ago, and recall this was one of my favorites. Wonderful portrayal of Oxford at a certain time.
  • (4/5)
    Beautiful language, gloriously ridiculous plots, and the first to bring the emotional life of her characters into the fore of the mystery. (Even though she did insist on apologizing for it.)
  • (4/5)
    Great Vane/Wimsey mystery with an evocative Oxford setting. Near great read for a mystery. I did figure out the villian before the end though. Does Wimsey have any flaws? Physical, emotional. intellectual? I didn't see many in the five Sayers books I've read so far. Sayers can set her characters in convincing and complex surroundings. I'll probably read it again.
  • (5/5)
    My favorite of the Lord Wimsey books. Perhaps because he and Harriet finally come to an understanding, or maybe because the long-lost days of 1930s Oxford are so interesting.
  • (5/5)
    A much acclaimed favorite among Sayers fans, a good mystery, story and romance. I love it, though I also love several of her other Lord Peter novels as well.This book is from Harriet Vane's perspective, for the most part. She is still trying to cope with the devastating events in her life, and with that persistent man who wishes to marry her. In the midst of this turmoil, she is thrown into a different sort. Her beloved college, Shrewsbury is having a Gaudy. Attending with one of her old classmates, Harriet's feelings are torn between the comfort and security of Oxford and the feeling that one can never go back. She feels safe here, but is she? Someone is causing mischief at the college. Not just harmless pranks, but twisted, cruel things. Evil is intended, but for whom? Harriet is called upon for her experience and wisdom to help sort out the trouble and as she works at the knot she worries about her own intentions and motives. When Lord Peter arrives in the story, fireworks begin, not only for them, but for the college as well.
  • (3/5)
    A series of frightening events at a women's college in Oxford are investigated by Harriet Vane and Lord Peter Wimsey. As usual, Sayers' work is engaging, intricate, and satisfying to read.
  • (2/5)
    This book is a romance novel of the sort that Mary Renault wrote during and immediately after WWII before she turned to writing historical novels. The two protagonists are sensitive to just about everything; so much so that this reader can't really tell what's bothering them half the time. How much better if they would just get over themselves and start doing something instead of crushing each other with a well-chosen phrase and then quoting French poets.Sayers' previous Lord Peter works, even those involving Harriet Vane, were actually mysteries or at least adventures of one sort or another. The plot is hung around a mystery of sorts; but the whole purpose of the mystery is to explore the Place of Woman in Society. It is therefore important that the investigator remain clueless for a long time while various events transpire. Consequently, Wimsey and Miss Climpson are kept entirely out of the action until Wimsey arrives at the very end of the book. Harriet Vane observes rather than detects and what she mostly observes is the behavior of the dons and the students while she ponders her true calling in nature and what she ought to do with herself.In previous books Harriet Vane seemed to deal pretty well with the fact that she was "branded an adulteress" but in this book she gets all wobbly whenever anybody alludes to "her past". There is a lot of very veiled talk about the wonderfulness of sex and how any society where the majority of the people were not engaging in regular sexual activity must be warped and twisted. There is no overt hint of lesbianism but the science tutor is strong, frequently wears tweeds, very direct, and sits in a "mannish" way.As with previous books, Sayers draws a compelling picture of a society still out of whack due to the terrible carnage of WWI. More women are working rather than married, and women are earning advanced degrees at Oxford colleges. The picture of Oxford with all its whacky customs and architecture, its quads and staircases and sported oaks and fining and segregation of the sexes is well-drawn. The proper study of all students is either History or English --- the Science tutor is away from the college for one whole term and nobody seems to notice the difference. Mathematics is not yet heard of. Peter Medawar began at Oxford in 1932 and had no real difficulty finding science stuff to do, so this picture represents Sayers' own bias rather than the actual state of affairs at Oxford itself although things may have been different at women's colleges. "Scholarship" is portrayed as some sort of holy vocation in the humanities; although its products are actually shown to be more or less useless as in the remarks on Vane's own study of LeFanu. It is unlikely that any more accurate understanding of Phoenician coinage will ever be arrived at as there are probably not enough remaining coins or documents hanging around; why should anyone care? The scholars in this book seems almost like Talmudic scholars; there is no iron test of "Does it work?" or "Does it inform the decisions we make today?" and the same old scholarly ground is relentlessly worked over until it must be completely worked out.The novel was published in 1935, just four years before the outbreak of WWII. Hitler is already a well-known name and there is some enthusiasm among some of the minor characters for various systems of eugenics. There is also the usual talk about evil being just a biological problem, easily eliminated by means of drugs or surgery. Lord Peter Wimsey, now a minor diplomat as much as a detective, does not believe that war will be avoided but continues to do his best to defer it.In this, her last true Lord Peter Wimsey novel (Busman's Honeymoon was actually the book of the play, and not an original novel), Sayers' literary vices detract most from her literary virtues.
  • (4/5)
    Dorothy Sayers's third tale which includes the mystery writer, Harriet Vane, is set at Oxford University where a series of events has everyone on edge and wondering who could be vandalizing the university and slandering the good names of those who go there. This is a good read to see how far mystery/detective books have come. It is also a good idea of how far and women have come! Thank Heavens! Admittedly, this was not my favorite, but it did interest me enough to keep reading to the end where I am very happy to say that someone finally woke up!
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite books, my well-thumbed paperback copy has been with me since my college/post college days in Eugene, OR and still bears a sticker from Smith Family Used Books (I paid $2.00 for it). Love walking around Oxford when in England and spotting locations that appear in the book. Must have been purchased in the early 80's based on the publication date.
  • (5/5)
    The final stretch of the longstanding saga of Lord Peter's courtship of Harriet Vane (who is more reasonable and likable in this one than in most others :)). Includes hilarious insights into the workings of the Denver family. The old Duchess is fabulous, as always.
  • (4/5)
    This is a close second to my favorite Wimsey story, "The Nine Tailors". Others have described the basic plot, but new readers will be surprised to see one of the most romantic marriage proposals in modern fiction delivered - and responded to - in Latin.
  • (4/5)
    My mom was a big English mystery fan, and I devoured her library at an early age, but haven't really gone back to read them until my wife took an interest in Elizabeth Peters a few years ago, and followed with Agatha Christie, Dorothy Sayers, Patricia Moyes in a rather predictable fashion. I'd forgotten how good Ms. Sayers really is; Gaudy Night might be thought of as the third in a series of love stories with some incidental murders. By the time I'd gotten halfway through this one, I'd almost entirely lost interest in whodunit for wondering will they or won't they. Much better characterization than you usually get in standard mysteries.
  • (5/5)
    How many books contain marriage proposals in Latin? Dear Dorothy!
  • (3/5)
    Rather self-indulgent story. Sayers obviously loved Oxford and the scholastic life. Lots of local references and untranslated 'bon mots'. Readers who do not share her passions are in for a slow read. The book has more to do with the heart versus head tension of the heroine, Harriet, than with any detective work. Again, unless you already know and care about the characters involved this makes for a long, slow slog.
  • (3/5)
    Tension shifts and swirls in this novel, but the language is rather above the level we here in the USA usually hear or speak, and there are many British slang words that mean nothing to me. Deep discussions of morals and ethics define the story and deep character introspection add interest.
  • (3/5)
    I liked this book but didn't love it. Just like D. Sayer's other book I read, it kept me interested but I wasn't left satisfied for some reason.
  • (5/5)
    My favorite Sayers fiction and the only one that is a mystery but not a murder mystery. Ah, the joy of going back to one's college as an expert and the joys of academic politics. Good read.
  • (4/5)
    Lord Peter No. 10, 1935; Harrit Vane not only solves the crime but finally (my, how we have been longing for this!) accepts Lord Peter's proposal.
  • (4/5)
    Only hopeless devotees of the intriguing pursuit of Lord Peter Wimsey for the hand of Harriet Vane would put up with almost 500 pages of reading about petty but pernicious mischief at Oxford College. Someone bears a grudge against one of the female dons and goes on a spree of making vengeful and threatening disturbances and sending mail designed to create fear and chaos on that serene campus. Harriet Vane, a writer of mysteries and graduate of Oxford is called in to help, but eventually finds that she needs the incomparable mind of Lord Peter who has been proposing marriage to her for five years. The final scene with Harriet and Peter in the moonlight under Magdalen Bridge is worth the reading of the book, although you may as I did have to look up some Latin words which Dorothy Sayers tends to throw into her stories at critical points when you want to know exactly what is being said. Beautiful and cerebral language and references in the tradition-laden setting of Oxford.
  • (2/5)
    Sayers writes an interesting book about the emergence of women into the academic field. Sayers employs extensive description of the setting and characters and events that at times halts the flow of the story. The relationship between Harriet Vane and Peter Wimsey seems unreal, but of course, the story is set in the 1930's. Slight mention is made of Hitler. The English higher education system is confusing, but Sayers patiently tries to guide the reader through the maze.