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Nicht verfügbarMord im Gurkenbeet, Episode 1
In Ihrem Land nicht verfügbar

Mord im Gurkenbeet, Episode 1

Geschrieben von Alan Bradley

Erzählt von Andrea Sawatzki


In Ihrem Land nicht verfügbar

Mord im Gurkenbeet, Episode 1

Geschrieben von Alan Bradley

Erzählt von Andrea Sawatzki

Bewertungen:
3.5/5 (67 Bewertungen)
Länge:
1 Stunde
Freigegeben:
Nov 22, 2013
ISBN:
9783943732221
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Die junge Flavia de Luce staunt nicht schlecht, als sie im ersten Morgenlicht das Opfer eines Giftmordes in ihrem Gurkenbeet entdeckt! Da jeder ihren Vater, den sanftmütigen Colonel de Luce, für den Mörder zu halten scheint, nimmt die naseweise Flavia persönlich die Ermittlungen auf. Hartnäckig folgt sie jeder noch so abwegigen Spur - bis sie einsehen muss, dass ihr Vater tatsächlich ein dunkles Geheimnis hütet. Und so befürchtet Flavia schließlich, dass sie vielleicht eine zu gute Detektivin ist ...
Freigegeben:
Nov 22, 2013
ISBN:
9783943732221
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

The author has been responsible for the production of a number of fiction and non-fiction books, plus a large catalogue of television and radio scripts. The work on "For No One" was first created some fifteen years ago, but all of the limited number of manuscripts disappeared in unexplained circumstances. Fresh, intensive research and exhaustive interviews with major characters has led to new information being uncovered, and the decision to re-write the book.. This new publication in novel form tells the full, eventful tale to enable readers to learn about these tragic and bizarre incidents. Even if not persuaded by the author or the story, it is certain that readers will be left using one word to describe much of the sad, tumultuous Seltaeb story. Curious!


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3.5
67 Bewertungen / 384 Rezensionen
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  • (4/5)
    Flavia de Luce is a genius living with 2 sisters, who she does not get along with in the least, her father who does not like to leave the house, a cook who is not a very good one according to Flavia and her father's valet/chauffeur/gardner etc. Flavia is a genius in the area of chemistry and is often experimenting on her sisters. There is a murder at their house and her father is arrested for the crime. Can Flavia solve the murder and free her father. A fun read.
  • (4/5)
    3.75 stars11-year old Flavia de Luce loves chemistry and is very interested in poisons. When she discovers someone who has been murdered in her yard, she sets out to figure out what happened. I listened to the audio and I loved the narrator. I also loved Flavia. I loved her character and the way "she" (or the author) described things. Despite all this, my mind did wander at times, so I did miss things, so I'm rating the book a 3.5, "good", with an extra .25 stars for the brilliant narrator, Jane Entwhistle.
  • (3/5)
    I found this vaguely charming and vaguely horrifying in equal measures. I love Flavia but can't quite believe in her and having lived (a bit later) in post WWII times and find the environment she moves through more quirky than representational. And the murderer seems an add-on to spare the local population from being decimated in the event of a series.
  • (3/5)
    Flavia is a little too impressed with her own intelligence and probably shouldn't be hiding evidence from police officers, but it does get a lot better around half way through.
  • (2/5)

    This and other reviews can be found on Reading Between Classes

    Cover Impressions: I really like the simplicity of this cover. The symbols are very fitting and the color really makes it stand out on the shelf.

    The Gist: Flavia de Luce is a remarkable 11 year old. She is fascinated by Chemistry, particularly poisons. With a dead bird on her doorstep and a dead body in her garden, Flavia endeavors to put her prodigious wealth of knowledge to the test and solve not one, but two murder mysteries.

    Review: The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie felt a little like an overly large piece of dessert, delicious and comforting for the first few forkfuls but sickly sweet after one bite too many. Flavia de Luce is overly precocious and more than a little too intelligent to be believable. her ability to wax poetically about any subject, from history to music to lock picking, made her feel much older than her 11 years and tended to distract from the plot. Her manner of speaking felt like it fit with a time period far removed from the 1950's and her level of freedom to roam the countryside without a word of caution from any adults was concerning. I enjoyed Flavia's quick wit and the tumultuous relationship with her sisters but failed to see even a spark of caring to balance out the ire between them.

    The plot of this novel centered around two murder mysteries which were richly woven through time and included elements of illusion and sleight of hand. Ultimately however, the identity of the killer was a little too predictable and I would have preferred a nice plot twist. Secrets were often revealed through long winded speeches and details were repeated endlessly as Flavia mulled them over in her mind. There were moments when she was discovering a connection that I was certain she had actually made 10 or 15 pages earlier. The flashes of chemical knowledge that were of great interest to me as a Science teacher, became more and more complicated as the plot wore on. If my eyes were glazing over at these descriptions I can only imagine a person with little to no Scientific background would skim or abandon these sections altogether. The writing itself tended to be a little long winded and I found myself losing interest during several rambling sessions.

    I do not believe that I will continue with this series. While I enjoyed the IDEA of Flavia de Luce, pint sized chemist and part time investigator, I could not connect with the way that the character was executed and I think my time might be better spent with other child wonders.

    Teaching/Parental Notes:

    Age:15 and up (for reading level rather than content)
    Gender: Either
    Sex: None
    Violence: Death by poisoning, death by blunt force trauma, kidnapping.
    Inappropriate Language: Damn
    Substance Use/Abuse: Smoking
    Other Issues: Character describes having impersonated a stereotypical Asian man, included use of yellow face paint, pinning of eyes and racist accent.

    Notable Quotables:

    "If there is a thing I truly despise, it is being addressed as 'dearie.' When I write my magnum opus, A Treatise Upon All Poisons, and come to 'Cyanide,' I am going to put under 'Uses' the phrase 'Particularly efficacious in the cure of those who call one 'Dearie'"
  • (3/5)
    Flavia is certainly an interesting character - precocious, curious and bold. Throughout the book I had moments when her offbeat wit was enjoyable and other times when I simply didn't like it at all. By the end, there still weren't any warm-fuzzies towards her, but I did learn to accept her. Even so, following Flavia around to solve the mystery was engaging. Her knowledge of chemistry added a unique flavor to the book and mixed in with the plot nicely. The book has been well-received by other readers.Originally posted on: Thoughts of Joy
  • (4/5)
    Full review on my blog.This is a pleasing little murder mystery by Alan Bradbury set in rural England during the early 1950s. You've got to love Flavia de Luce. She is something akin to an 11 year old female Sherlock Holmes before he honed his deductive skills. She's brilliant but still too full of her own cleverness to spot enough of her mistakes early enough to stay out of trouble. Her head is also full of a riot of information, jostling for attention so much that the important clues sometimes get lost in the chaos.Stamp collecting is at the heart of Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie. Flavia's father is very keen on them. The mystery begins when a dead snipe is found with a Penny Black pinned to its beak. Later Flavia discovers a man expiring in the cucumber patch. Her father is arrested and accused of the murder. It is up to Flavia to clear his name using her extraordinary brain, her genius for chemistry and sheer pluck. More of these books featuring Flavia and co are planned. I'll be adding them to my to-read list forthwith.
  • (3/5)
    It took me 16 days to get through this 374 page book... that’s ridiculous, since I normally read a book in 2-3 days. I don’t know why, but I just wasn’t all that in to it. I liked it when I was reading it, but when I put it down I had almost no desire to start again. I finally switched to audio and managed to finish it on my walk today. Flavia is great, and the mystery was interesting enough. It could be that cozy mysteries are not for me.
  • (4/5)
    Whoa lots of impressive vocabulary words for an 11-year-old narrator -- and I loved it! Flavia de Luce is a precocious investigator and budding chemist who puts me to shame with her self-assuredness and tenacity. I liked her a lot, even though I didn't feel an immediate kinship with her (for instance, like I did with Anne of Green Gables). Still, she's a spunky little heroine and it was impossible not to root for her. AND, try as I might, I didn't manage to figure out the mystery before she did -- she was a step ahead of me all the way!
  • (5/5)
    This book could very well be the Harry Potter of YA mystery books. Set in 1950 England, the book's heroine, Flavia de Luce is sure to steal your heart. A precocious eleven-year-old with a love of chemistry, Flavia finds herself in the midst of a murder mystery. She sets out to solve the crime and clear her Father's name. In the process, she discovers more about her parents and about herself than she had bargained for.The writing is excellent and flows with great ease. The Advance Reading Copy I received was 370 pages long, but moved at such a quick pace that it felt half that. This book was one that lingered in my thoughts even after I'd pause and put it down. The humor is perfectly adapted to be well in line with Flavia's character. The mystery unfolds expertly, never divulging too much, keeping the reader interested, and all the way seeming absolutely reasonable. I dislike crime novels that string a plot along until the mystery is solved and everything tidied up in the last 5 pages. This book is nothing of the sort. Bradley delivers snippets of information in small doses, so the reader feels that they, along with Flavia, are uncovering the truths in a natural way. I, for one, cannot wait for Bradley's next book featuring more adventures with Flavia.The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie is a great read, one I'm positive that both my mother and my 11-year-old nephew will enjoy as much as I did. I am getting this in the mail right out to them, so that they may be entranced with Flavia and Bradley's writing.
  • (4/5)
    Though I have read other books in this series this book is the first in the series. It did a good job of showing the main characters off and was very good but they get better.
  • (4/5)
    I love Flavia. A fun mystery set after WWII in the U.K. - Flavia is a geek girl chemist who solves crimes. Worth a read.
  • (4/5)
    While I don't technically consider myself a mystery-lover, I really enjoyed this book a lot! I listened to it on audio, which probably contributed quite a lot to my enjoyment. The narrator was delightful! I suspected that I knew the answer to the mystery quite early on--but I was wrong! That pleased me to no end--I don't want to figure out the mystery way ahead of the protagonist! However, I hesitate to give five full stars to this, simply because Flavia (our main character) is SO into chemistry that it felt a little too "sciency" for my tastes. I mean, it made complete sense to the story... I just tend to tune out when things get really technical. Other than that, Flavia is quite an enjoyable character, and she's brilliant as well as mischievous and funny. She sounds like just the kind of 11 year old girl I'd have been friends with at that age.
  • (4/5)
    Probably one of the most entertaining books I've read in years. Inside all of us who grew up living inside books, our heads and our imaginations Flavia is part of all of us.
  • (4/5)
    I kept seeing posts about this book and the series on Litsy so I decided to take the plunge and give it a try. It didn't disappoint. I really enjoy Flavia's character. The story was a fun and easy read. I can't wait to dive into the next book.
  • (4/5)
    This book came highly recommended by several people and I really enjoyed it. It blends mystery with social history and a very astute but believable 11 year old narrator. As a mystery fan, I could have wished the mystery plot were a little "tighter" but the story is completely engaging and I will definitely read more from the series.
  • (5/5)
    Recommended for anyone who has enjoyed Laurie King's Mary Russell series and/or Harriot the Spy!
    Lots of fun, super fast but enjoyable, not a forgotten blur (you know who you are!).
  • (4/5)
    "I wish I could say I was afraid, but I wasn't. Quite the contrary. This was by far the most interesting thing that had ever happened to me in my entire life." This according to the narrator, eleven year old Flavia de Luce regarding finding a dead body in the cucumber patch.

    Delightful. The style is quirky and fun, with a real relish for language and the period. I'm going to say this is a three and a half star read. Agh, this rating system is difficult! :) I may change my mind. (this is this month's group read and discussion.)
  • (2/5)
    This is something that maybe should have appealed to me, as it is a bit different, a bit quirky, and has a strong female character. Unfortunately, far from finding this a cozy mystery I think it is meant to be, I found it slightly painful reading. All the characters were unpleasant and deeply unhappy, and the relationship between Flavia and her sisters seemed quite bitter.
  • (5/5)
    This delightful mystery, which is set in post-war England in 1950, features Flavia de Luce, heroine, chemist, sleuth, youngest child, and clever eleven year old. It will appeal to anyone who enjoys a well-written story, with well-developed characters, and an engaging plot. And, it will have a special appeal to history buffs, anglophiles, philatelists, and amateur scientists. It has my highest possible recommendation. I can't wait for the next book in what I hope will become a series.
  • (4/5)
    A book is often only as good as its primary character, and Bradley has created a gem in Flavia de Luce, youngest of three daughters. She is intelligent, clever, and obsessed with her mother's old chemistry laboratory. One early morning she comes across the body of a man in the family's cucumber patch. With an irresistible sense of curiosity she pursues the case with remarkable resourcefulness. The pages flew by on this book and the resolution, while foreseeable, was realistic. I will definitely be reading the next in the series.
  • (4/5)
    Implausible bit of fun, with lots of chemistry thrown in. The reading was excellent, conveying well an 11-year old snottiness.
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this story. I loved the character Bradley created with Flavia. As a gifted teacher, I saw bits and pieces of my students in her. She was highly intelligent and sometimes got boastful about what she knew. She interacted more with adults than with her own peers. And because she was truly 11 and had the understanding of a child, jumped to a few wrong conclusions with her deductions. This is definitely a series I will continue reading.
  • (3/5)
    The first in a series of nine books, this is a lighthearted murder mystery revolving around two highly prized postage stamps that collectors would and others do, die for. Flavia is not your usual everyday eleven year old girl, having a almost obsessive interest in chemistry, particularly poisons and their antidotes. Set in 1950's England it reads like a slightly more grown up version of a Famous Five novel. There's no violence, well nothing gruesome, the murder details won't make you cringe and scattered throughout are some delightfully written descriptive phrases. I won't be rushing out and get the next book, however if I found myself at a loose end for something to read it would be a good book to take on holidays.
  • (4/5)
    Pippi Longstocking meets Miss Marple
  • (4/5)
    I received a review copy of this book from the publisher through Library Thing's Member Giveaway program.Overall, I found "The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie" to be fun little murder mystery. The book did start off a bit slow, but as other reviewers have noted, it definitely picks up as you go along. The actual mystery plot initially seems rather simple, but the circumstances are actually quite complicated. That said, I did not find myself getting lost in details at all.Previous reviewers have mentioned that their reception of the book itself was in part reliant on their reception of the 11-year-old protagonist, Flavia de Luce. I myself happened like Flavia, possibly because she reminded me a bit of myself growing up-a nosy, know-it-all science geek who faces the torment of an older sister.While I enjoyed the book overall, there were some weak points in my opinion. There are a lot of infodumps found in the story that disrupt some of the flow of the overall narrative. However, Bradley manages to keep these both clear and interesting; I was actually intrigued by the history of a postage stamp. There were also some loose ends and unanswered questions; the motive for one of the murders is never stated.A good read overall.
  • (5/5)
    Delightful!
  • (5/5)
    Cute and amusing.
  • (4/5)
    Unexpected. Excellent. Delightful.
  • (4/5)
    I thought the story was very creative and the main character engaging. I listened to the mp3 version, and enjoyed the reader.