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Nicht verfügbarBretonische Verhältnisse
In Ihrem Land nicht verfügbar

Bretonische Verhältnisse

Geschrieben von Jean-Luc Bannalec

Erzählt von Gerd Wameling


In Ihrem Land nicht verfügbar

Bretonische Verhältnisse

Geschrieben von Jean-Luc Bannalec

Erzählt von Gerd Wameling

Bewertungen:
3.5/5 (5 Bewertungen)
Länge:
6 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Sep 26, 2014
ISBN:
9783862311552
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Entsetzen im pittoresken Künstlerdorf Pont Aven: Kurz vor der sommerlichen Hochsaison wird der betagte Inhaber des legendären Hotel Central - Monsieur Pennec - erstochen aufgefunden. Kommissar Georges Dupin steht vor einem Rätsel. Wer ermordet einen 91-Jährigen und warum? Hat die Geschichte etwas mit der beeindruckenden Gemäldesammlung des Hauses zu tun? Als wenig später auch der Sohn des Hotelbesitzers ermordet aufgefunden wird, ahnt Dupin, dass er es mit einem Fall ungeahnten Ausmaßes zu tun hat. Ein Krimi voller überraschender Wendungen, feinsinnig und mit hintergründigem Humor.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Sep 26, 2014
ISBN:
9783862311552
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

Jean-Luc Bannalec is a pseudonym; the author divides his time between Germany and the southern Finistere. Death in Pont-Aven, the first case for Detective Dupin, was published in German in March 2012 and spent many months on the bestseller list.


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Was die anderen über Bretonische Verhältnisse denken

3.6
5 Bewertungen / 10 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (3/5)
    A well known & popular restaurant/hotel owner is found stabbed to death in his bar... His will was to have been changed, as he had been told that he had weeks remaining to live, but he was killed before the changes to his will could be made.Commissaire Dupin is called upon to solve the case... what he discovers is a forgery of a forgery of a relatively unknown painting by Gauguin the original was to be left to the Musee de'Orsay. The estranged 1/2 brother of the murdered man shows up, but has been left nothing in the will....Without the change of the will, the son of the hotel owner inherits.. but then he too is murdered...I did like this book, I found it to be engaging and I read it in one sitting.I did skip much of the descriptive narrative, and I didn't like the ending as someone involved in the crime was given a political pass....
  • (3/5)
    Wonderful locale, nicely described. Dupin has enough eccentricities for several detectives. Supporting cast quite flat and bland. The locale merits another try. Hopefully, the characters will evolve to be similarly interesting.
  • (3/5)
    This first installment in the series features Commissar Dupin who must unravel a mystery concerning the death of an old man with no known enemies. Without giving too much of the plot away, art forgeries and art theft and possible plans to change a will all factor into this one. At the center is a painting which may or may not have been painted by Gaugin. I liked it well enough to want to read future installments in the series; however, much improvement can be made in characterization. The author created enough red herrings to keep the reader guessing "whodunit."
  • (3/5)
    Summary: Commissaire Georges Dupin is a police detective who moved to Brittany from Paris several years ago but is still widely regarded as an outsider by the local Bretons. He is called upon to investigate the murder of a 90-year-old hotel owner with no known enemies, in a small town that was known for being home to several important post-impressionist painters at the turn of the century, notably Paul Gauguin, who may have left behind a previously-unknown painting as a gift for his patron, the victim's grandmother.Review: Murder mysteries aren't necessarily my genre of choice, but I thought this one was pretty interesting, and I enjoyed the connection to the art world. Art history, forgery, discovery, etc. are all things that I've found interesting themes in other books I've read (The Lost Painting and The Forgery of Venus come to mind, although The Swan Thieves and The Goldfinch are notable exceptions), so I was pleasantly surprised to discover that connection in what I thought was a more standard mystery novel. The mystery itself was fairly well done, with a decent number of red herrings, although I figured out whodunnit fairly early on (although not exactly how, as is usual for me - I can pick up on author's clues about personality and motive much better than I can reconstruct crime scene details, apparently.) However, this book ultimately wasn't a success for me, and that was largely due to the writing and/or the translation. I actually think its both; the translation felt like a rushed job by someone who wasn't familiar with idiomatic English, so there were places that got fairly awkward to read, if never actually unintelligible. But I don't think the translation is entirely to blame; the characterization of the main character, who I believe stars in a whole series of novels, was lackluster at best. Personality quirks (like being a caffeine addict) are not the same thing as character building, and this book has a heavy hand with the former and unfortunately not much of the latter. So, while I was interested enough to keep reading to find out the solution to the mystery, I didn't really care about the characters, and wasn't rooting for the detective as much as I think I probably should have been. 3 out of 5 stars.Recommendation: There's no shortage of detective mystery novels out there, and while this one was pretty good on the mystery, it wasn't the strongest on the detective, if that's your taste. A light and fast enough read, this would be good for a vacation read, although I don't think it's one that's going to stick with me very long.
  • (4/5)
    This is an exciting first case in a new series. Commissar George Dupin, who came three years ago from Paris to Brittany and still counts as foreign, which may not be familiar with the Breton ratios, has to solve the murder of a hotel owner. The ninety year old dead seems to have no enemies. His grandmother, who had founded the hotel, was a great patron of the arts who knew the great artists from the late 19th century and was home. Specifically, she was a friend of Paul Gaugin. That friendship made the small Breton village famous and their descendants were eagerly continue this fame. What supposedly was a closely guarded family secret that an original Gaugin hangs in the dining room, but it turned into a linchpin in this case. Dupin and his entourage have their hands full trying to catch the murderer.I liked not only the story but also the people who appear in it. It reminds me of holidays in Brittany, to the food, the harsh climate but also the friendliness of these grumpy people.
  • (3/5)
    Bannalec has written a mystery with a marvelous sense of place, complete with some of its fascinating historical background. His descriptions are so vivid it was easy for me to picture the beautiful setting. The mystery is also a good one, with tie-ins to local history and to Paul Gauguin. What is lacking in Death in Brittany is characterization. It's all about the investigation here. None of the characters come to life. Dupin's two inspectors become mere minions after very brief introductions. Dupin is constantly saying, "We need to talk," but readers are never allowed to hear what they talk about. Part of the fun of reading mysteries is being allowed to be the proverbial fly on the wall. There's none of that here, and it's missed-- as are more fully fleshed characters.
  • (5/5)
    For the past 3months or so I have been deluged with thoroughly mediocre and unthrilling "thrillers" and a couple of idiotic "accidental detective" mysteries. "Death in Brittany" is a restorative breath of sea air that has renewed my faith that thoughtful writers who observe the world and the characters who inhabit it can still find publishers, although perhaps not in the USA.The faults negative reviewers cite here are points of strength as far as I am concerned. I don't want jabbering detectives who bare their souls and flash their weapons. I want detectives who detect, quietly absorbing local culture matching, its slow pace. I want individuals who to eat in the small dark places the tourists don't know, where the food is good and no one talks. I want detectives who know that crimes are rooted in history, and I want them to solve murders using their little grey cells."Death in Brittany" gave me all of this and reading it was a great pleasure.I received a review copy of "Death in Brittany" by Jean-Luc Bannalec (St. Martin's Press) through NetGalley.com.
  • (4/5)
    Kommissar Dupin eckt nicht selten mit seiner eigenwilligenund ruppigen Art bei Mitmenschen und Vorgesetzten an. Diesführt zu seiner Versetzung aus dem geliebten Paris an das äußerste Ende Frankreichs, in die Bretagne. Doch auch wenner es sich selbst nicht gerne eingesteht, fühlt er sich "schon" nach 3 Jahren heimisch, liebt das Meer, das besondere Licht, das viel diskutierte Wetter und insbesondere die Küche. Und Verbrechen und damit Arbeit gibt es auch in der vermeintlichen Idylle. Mitten im Sommer, während der Hochsaison, wird im pittoresken Künstlerdorf Pont Aven der Hotelier Pennec ermordet. Und das, obwohl der über 90-Jährige sowieso nur noch wenige Tage zu leben gehabt hätte. Pennecs Hotel beherbergte einstGaugin und andere Künstler. Liegt das Mordmotiv in dieser Vergangenheit des Hotels, oder sind doch Familienfehden undErbstreitigkeiten die Auslöser? Mit Dupin hat der französisch-deutsche Autor Bannalec eine fast altmodisch anmutende Figur mit Seriencharakter erschaffen, der ganz inder Manier traditioneller Kriminalromane vor attraktiver Kulisse agiert. Für alle Bibliotheken empfohlen.
  • (4/5)
    Reading this story is a bit like tasting wine, sometimes you savor the sweetness, sometimes the taste is a little dry, and sometimes you notice a hint of something you can’t quite put a name on. French Police Commissaire George Dupin finds himself in charge of a murder investigation in the village of Pont-Aven located in the picturesque provence of Brittany. Being a native Parisian himself, he still feels out of place among the Bretons, their old Celtic traditions, and their suspicious attitude towards outsiders. A local hotelier, Pierre-Louis Pennec,93 years old and well respected, has been stabbed to death in his own hotel. None of the locals has a clue who would do this or why. At least no one in this close knit village is admitting to anything. It will take all of Commissaire Dupin’s skill as well as some unusual outside help to discover the motive for this murder. Could the murderer be someone on the hotel’s staff, or Politician Andre Pennec, the murdered man’s half brother? Perhaps the hotelier’s son or daughter-in-law, or one of the dead man’s many friends in town? Why would any of these people kill a 93 year old man who was the scion of a well respected family in this community in the heart of a picturesque countryside immortalized in the art of Paul Gauguin. The plot is good, the location has an exotic flavor. The only drawback is in the syntax. It occasionally reads like my old French grammar book, very formal and often overly repetitive. Book provide for review by Amazon Vine
  • (4/5)
    Death in Brittany by Jean-Luc Bannalec is the first book in his Commissaire Dupin series and a fantastic introduction to the world of French police procedurals. Death in Brittany takes the reader to Brittany and more precisely the sea-side resort of Pont-Aven, which the author describes with such beautiful prose it is quite easy to imagine actually walking the streets, visiting the cafes, and seeing the sites with Commissaire Dupin, who is a self-deprecating detective, delightful in the fact that he is for lack of a better term, a curmudgeon, his character is an endearing one. The story opens in July, right before the high season begins with the brutal stabbing of 91-year old Pierre-Louis Pennec, the owner of the famous Center hotel, his murder alone is a curious one with more attention than Commissaire Dupin would care for when another body turns up on the Brittany coast causing the locals to increase the pressure for Dupin to solve the two murders and to do so quickly and efficiently, easier said than done and Commissaire Dupin finds himself investigating far more than he imagined. Death in Brittany is a brilliantly executed whodunit that once begun the reader will be reluctant to set down. Bannalec’s main detective is excellently portrayed, I completely understood his caffeine addiction and happened to enjoy his curmudgeonly ways. Bannalec’s story is decidedly character driven and his characters and quite eclectic and enjoyable in their many eccentricities. Death in Brittany is not a straightforward whodunit; rather there are many unexpected plot twists and red herrings expertly placed to keep the reader engaged and continually guessing. I look forward the other books in the series being translated to English, as I am rather enamored with Commissaire Dupin.