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Nicht verfügbarBretonisches Gold
In Ihrem Land nicht verfügbar

Bretonisches Gold

Geschrieben von Jean-Luc Bannalec

Erzählt von Gerd Wameling


In Ihrem Land nicht verfügbar

Bretonisches Gold

Geschrieben von Jean-Luc Bannalec

Erzählt von Gerd Wameling

Bewertungen:
4/5 (4 Bewertungen)
Länge:
7 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jan 29, 2016
ISBN:
9783862313334
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Kommissar Dupin ist fasziniert von den spektakulären Salzgärten auf der Guérande-Halbinsel. Im Auftrag einer befreundeten Journalistin sucht er hier nach mysteriösen Fässern, als urplötzlich auf ihn geschossen wird. Der Täter ist nicht auszumachen, und wenig später verschwindet die Journalistin spurlos. Gemeinsam mit Rose, der zuständigen Kommissarin des Départements, beginnt Dupin zu ermitteln. Die beiden stoßen auf falsche Alibis, gewaltige Interessenkonflikte und immer wieder auf urbretonische Geschichten. Dann überschlagen sich die Ereignisse und Dupin und Rose ahnen, dass ihnen nur noch wenig Zeit bleibt, um den Fall zu lösen.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jan 29, 2016
ISBN:
9783862313334
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

Jean-Luc Bannalec is a pseudonym; the author divides his time between Germany and the southern Finistere. Death in Pont-Aven, the first case for Detective Dupin, was published in German in March 2012 and spent many months on the bestseller list.



Rezensionen

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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    #123Commissaire Georges Dupin has recently heard from a friend & investigative reporter, Lilou Breval, that there is something strange going on in the White Land of Le Sel (the natural salt harvesting pools) and it has to do w/ mysterious blue barrels that should not be in the salt marshes...While investigating, le Commissaire is shot and then locked into a tin hut at the marshes... causing an uncomfortable interaction w/ Sylvaine Rose, the inspector whose territory the Breton Salt Pools are in. Georges is paired w/ Sylvaine against both of their wishes as part of an ongoing rivalry between their bosses.At low tide the body of Lilou is discovered, she had been murdered and her laptop stolen... Lilou had been interviewing several main players in the Salt business; independent paludiers (salt marsh workers), co-op paludiers, and the new high-profile salt conglomerate; all with much to lose should their salt be found to be contaminated.This was a very interesting subject and story, but it was boring in many places which of course caused me to skip paragraphs at a time... so I had to knock off 1 StarI do believe, I'll go back and read others in the series.
  • (4/5)
    Thank you to St. Martin's Press, Minotaur Books and NetGalley for an advance e-copy of The Fleurs de Sel Murders by Jean-Luc Bannalec in exchange for an honest review. I had no idea what was involved in having sea salt in my kitchen. The book was worth it just for the information gained about the process of harvesting sea salt and fleur de sel ( the superior grade of sea salt). Hard work and Mother Nature make this a tenuous crop. This novel is situated in Brittany, on the Atlantic side of France, also known as the white land because of the salt harvest. Commissaire Dupin is outside of his jurisdiction when he in investigates suspicious barrels in the salt marshes. His help has been requested by his journalist friend, Lilou Reval.. While verifying her information, he is shot and locked in one of the salt sheds. He is rescued by Commissaire Rose, whose jurisdiction he is in. The two join forces to investigate the goings-on in the salt marshes and are lead to murder, mayhem and the politics of sea salt. It was an enjoyable read and readers will feel like they are in Brittany. The lyrical prose gives us a sense of being there and isn't that the reason we read.
  • (4/5)
    THE FLEUR de SEL MURDERS by Jean-Luc Bannalec is the second book I’ve read from this author. This the third outing for his Commissaire Dupin among the wilds of Brittany, France. Dupin has been given a tip from a journalist friend of his, a puzzling hint about “Blue Barrels” out among the salt marshes. Hardly a crime and without further information something he normally wouldn’t look into, but she is a friend of his and a trusted writer of all things in the North West of France, so he goes.Once upon the salt marshes, where the ocean has been harvested for it’s precious treasure for centuries, Dupin is shot at, wounded, and trapped in a small hut overnight. As a victim of a crime, and way out of his jurisdiction, Dupin is not part of the investigation, but his boss soon settles the situation and Dupin finds himself in the awkward situation of being on almost an equal footing as Commissaire Rose, but it is her territory and so he, and his investigators, answer to her.Dupin would find this a troubling situation except Commissaire Rose is like a female image of him, doing what he would do, asking the same questions, as kurt and dynamic as he. You can almost feel a love thing growing, but Dupin has that aspect covered, unless he doesn’t come through for his beloved Claire on her birthday.There is a mystery on the salt flats, several parties with almost apparently nothing to gain by any of the happenings, yet people keep dying. This is a neat little view into a part of the world few travelers venture to, and it courses around an industry that is both ancient, yet necessary. You learn a great deal about the harvesting of ocean salt and the future of the industry.And there is a pretty good mystery here also.
  • (4/5)
    I was unfamiliar with the Brittany Mysteries by Jean-Luc Bannalec until I read The Fleur de Sel Murders. I am glad I discovered the series and had a lot of fun reading this installment. As a fan of all things French, I really enjoyed reading about the Brittany region and the salt farming that occurs in that area. Commissaire Dupin is a marvelous protagonist with a clever and sly sense of humor, and the mystery taught me a lot about salt farming. The resolution was realistic and wrapped the story up nicely. My favorite part of the book was learning so much about the Bretons: the language, the ancient Breton legends, and the characteristics of the people from that area. The one small issue I have with the story is that Bannalec includes a ton of information and detail about salt farming – more than the average reader is going to want to read, but it does not take away from the story at all. I thoroughly enjoyed The Fleur de Sel Murders and look forward to the next book in the series. Thanks to Minotaur Books and NetGalley for my copy. All opinions are my own.
  • (4/5)
    Einfach nett. Bissl überzogene Geschichte, aber die wunderbar zurückhaltenden Schilderungen der Landschaft und Leute machen das Buch doch wieder sympathisch.