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Gold

Geschrieben von Chris Cleave

Erzählt von Britta Steffenhagen

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In Ihrem Land nicht verfügbar

Gold

Geschrieben von Chris Cleave

Erzählt von Britta Steffenhagen

Bewertungen:
4/5 (16 Bewertungen)
Länge:
7 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Sep 19, 2014
ISBN:
9783862312498
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Kate und Zoey, beste Freundinnen und größte Konkurrentinnen, trainieren seit Jahren für ihren großen Traum: olympisches Gold im Radrennen. Doch dann geht nur Zoey an den Start. Kate hat sich gegen den Sport und für ihre schwer kranke Tochter entschieden. Als die beiden acht Jahre später doch noch gegeneinander antreten und Kate gewinnt, muss Zoey erkennen, dass ihre Freundin die bessere ist. Voller Neid blickt sie auf Kate, die nicht den Fehler begangen hat, ihr privates Glück dem sportlichen Erfolg zu opfern. Sie trifft eine Entscheidung, die alles in Frage stellt, was die beiden bisher verbunden hat.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Sep 19, 2014
ISBN:
9783862312498
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

Chris Cleave is the author of Everyone Brave is Forgiven, Gold, Incendiary, and the #1 New York Times bestseller Little Bee. He lives with his wife and three children in London, England. Visit him at ChrisCleave.com or on Twitter @ChrisCleave.



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Was die anderen über Gold denken

3.8
16 Bewertungen / 52 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (5/5)


    I really like Chris Cleave's writing style. I didn't expect to like Gold as much as I liked Little Bee but in fact I loved it, more so than Little Bee. Now I need to go read Incendiary.
  • (3/5)
    I really struggled to read this book, cos I liked the other hand so much. But the characters seemed 2d and I'm not a big fan of competitive cycling. Zoe did some truly awful things and the other characters just didn't seem to react, possibly cos their life was so taken up with other things. I didn't really like any of the voices in this tale - they felt off the shelf.
  • (4/5)
    Enjoyed this one quite a bit, particularly after the half- way mark when it became full of suspense and captured what the adrenaline of the racing experience must be like. It provided an insight into the world of cycling and childhood leukaemia through mostly believable characters.
  • (3/5)
    A compelling read with only five characters -- three cyclists, the coach, and the kid. Sort of a ghost, too, the dead kid brother who metaphorically haunts the one cyclist. Good tension and suspense and heart-wrenching without being ridiculous. Certainly could be made into a movie. A good example of a story that moves forward while the flashbacks help build a clearer picture of the real story as their timeline moves forward, too.
    Recommended reading.
  • (3/5)
    I read this after reading Cleave's excellent novel, Little Bee. I found this disappointing in comparison. It was interesting to get some insight into the demands of high-level competitive cycling, which is undoubtedly similar to other high performance sports. However, I found the characters rather one-dimensional. The emotionally troubled super star. The emotionally balanced super star. The man caught between them. The coach who blew his big moment by a hair's breadth. Little development here.
  • (4/5)
    I really don't like 5 point grading systems! This book rates 7/10. It is a good read. My wife suggests that this book is paced like track cycle sprint race, very slow at the start but gradually winding up to fast and furious finish. I agree, but the very slow start makes it hard to get involved and, I think, diminishes the impact. Also I could have done with much less of "Star Wars" and the epilogue was unnecessary. But having got my moans out of the way, I enjoyed it.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent book taking me right into the heart of Olympic athelites and training. Stars are Zoe and Kate and her husband Jake who are track cyclists. Zoe and Kate are friends and rivals at Oympic levels. Novel explores many moral choices each character must make. Is gold worth the price??
  • (4/5)
    Fascinating story of the human cost and sacrifice to win Olympic gold, based on two British cyclists.
  • (4/5)
    What an emotionally intense and powerful read I found this to be, who knew? When I first started reading this novel I thought "Super, a book about Olympic caliber cyclists" which was for me of interest in and of itself. Yet this book was so much more, Cleave has an unusual talent in developing characters that are easy to identify with. Yes it is about the athletes conditioning, dieting and training, which I found to be absolutely amazing, but it is about friendship and sacrifice as well. Loved the character of little Sophie and her total love of all things Star Wars, but my favorite character was the old trainer Tom. Loved his private musings and his crusty old knowledge. This is a novel that slowly sucks you in and I found myself almost holding my breath at the end. Another wonderful novel by Cleave. ARC by NetGalley.
  • (3/5)
    Thank you to Simon and Schuster for providing me with a copy of this novel to review.Zoe, Kate, and Jack are the three points of a love triangle. They are elite cyclists vying for their spot to win gold at the London Olympics. Jack and Zoe were a couple once upon a time, now it's Jack and Kate. No matter how the romantic entanglements play out, all three manage to remain friends. Complicating the quest for gold is Jack and Kate's young daughter Sophie who is sick with life threatening cancer. Kate has trouble focusing on her quest when her daughter may be close to dying. Her window to compete is shrinking and she has made many sacrifices in order to put Sophie first. She has one last chance to make her Olympic dreams come true but first she will have to defeat her friend and rival Zoe. Where Kate is restrained and proper Zoe is a tabloid darling. Zoe doesn't play by anyone's rules and when she races, she puts it all on the line because she has nothing to lose. A rule change means it will all come down to one last race between Kate and Zoe to see who gets the spot for the Olympics. Zoe will have to conquer her inner demons and Kate will have to set Sophie aside if either is to have a chance to win gold.The timing of this book couldn't have been more perfect. The Olympics are set to begin in a few short weeks and it was if the author decided to commemorate the event by crafting a novel. Although The timing was fortuitous the story was lacking. I really had to force myself through most of it. It was only when the relationship between Jack, Kate ,and Zoe was more fully explained that I found myself more interested. The book was formulaic in order to derive the most emotional response. Of course it would work out that Sophie would be at her sickest when Kate had to focus on her last competition. I really have to agree with the Entertainment Weekly review that came out on Friday giving it a C. The characters were one dimensional and I found that I didn't really care who won as long as the book was over. I hate to be so negative, especially about a book I was given. I have had Little Bee on my to be read pile forever. Hopefully I will be able to connect with that one more.
  • (5/5)
    I love how this book is organized, with flashbacks to the past and cute inserts about Star Wars and Sophie. This book would make a terrific movie, the characters feelings are brought out so well almost like poetry. I had so many emotions while reading this, and couldn't put it down! Really engaging story.
  • (4/5)
    Perfect read for these two weeks of London Olympic coverage.Two girls grow up friends and rivals in British cycling. One, the too-good-to-be-true Cate, has talent but too much heart. The other Zoe fuels her racing (and life) with anger and despair. Into this mix we put Jack, the male star of British racing, Tom, the girls' crusty old coach, and Sophie, a child desperately ill with leukemia. I read several negative reviews of this book but was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed it nonetheless. What is required to be the best of the best? And what would you give up to get there? I found the characters, though each a little one-dimensional, to be intriguing. As in Little Bee, the female characters carry this novel.
  • (4/5)
    A little too much sport.Chris Cleave is one of my favourite authors and I loved both The Other Hand (Little Bee) and Incendiary. Unfortunately Gold didn't quite make the same grade for me, mainly because of the intense concentration on Olympic cycling. Yes, it was topical and yes, I remember hearing that new rulings allowed only one athlete per country to compete in each event, but I'm afraid it didn't grip me and hold on tight, like his previous two novels had.We follow the careers of three cyclists from their entry into the British cycling squad at around 18, to their eventual retirement at 32. Zoe is a hard nut, determined to win at the expense of all else, Kate is driven but has family concerns weighing her down, and Jack, who makes a dramatic entrance at the Velodrome in Manchester at the start of his career but fails to keep up the pace in terms of characterisaton. Their coach, Tom was one of the most interesting characters, along with Jack's daughter, 8 yr old Sophie, who, although suffering from leukemia, does her utmost to protect her parents from worry.A large part of the novel concentrates on the relationship between these five people and this is where Chris Cleave excells, as ever. Only the interactions between Zoe and Kate felt a bit unbelievable from time to time, especially near the end.I did enjoy the insight into the world of Olympic cycling, the intense, painful training, the accurate measurement of food intake and the supreme influence of the coach. I learned a lot about the rigors of training and the sacrifices that athletes must make, but the heavy concentration on sport moved this down to a 4 star for me.However, there were many strokes of genius as befits this talented author, and I shall still be eagerly awaiting his next novel!
  • (3/5)
    Just beginning. I am a cover junky and many times the cover will sell the book for me. Wish me luck. Not my favorite book at all. I am half way through and just skimming....So much going on at once, much of which I could care less about. I guess I am alone in this opinion. Judging from the other reviews I have read.
  • (5/5)
    This is the story revolving around the world of cycling and childhood leukemia. It is a story of love and friendships and relationships and the challenges that develop in the lives of everyday people. It is the story of Zoe, Kate, Jack and Tom and the hopes and dreams of each of them. It is also the story of Sophie and her struggle with leukemia at a very young age and the challenges she faces to go into remission and work to become a cyclist herself. The twists and turns involved in telling this tale keep the reader on the edge and turning the next page. I highly recommend this book.
  • (5/5)
    After thoroughly enjoying Little Bee, I was excited when I had the opportunity to review Chris Cleave's new novel, Gold. While my expectations were high, honestly, Cleave actually exceeded those expectations and delivered something incredibly heartfelt, emotional and delightful to read.Just in time for the 2012 London Olympics, Chris Cleave offers a new novel about a part of olympic-level cyclists who have been best friends for years. Through all their training, determination and focus, Kate and Zoe have stuck together and supported each other through national competitions and even the Olympics. Now, they are facing the most difficult trial of their lives: the 2012 Olympics amid the trials of age, responsibilities of family and the unexpected difficulties that life tends to throw in your way. While Kate is naturally talented at the sport, she is dealing with her daughter Sophie, who is battling possible leukemia remissions. And Zoe, always competitive, is so desperate to win the gold, even at the expense of her friendship with Kate, that it could cost her her sanity.Gold is an incredibly well-written and emotional novel that captures the drama of the Velodrome linked with the trials of family life and friendship. Even though I actually read an Advanced Reader's edition of Gold, Cleave's writing was already tight and crisp. Every sentence resonates with the reader and draws them deeper into the story. I especially enjoyed the sections where Sophie narrated, much of which centered around Star Wars reference which really appealed to the nerd in me.Speaking of Sophie, it was incredible to see how she got lost in the world of Star Wars as a way to cope with her leukemia and other family issues. It's a very normal human response, especially for a child, and Cleave builds an incredible character through her quirky narration that make readers fall in love with her. And Sophie isn't the only character here that is well-constructed. Kate is an honest and realistic woman that has to balance work and home life while still trying to follow her dreams. Zoe, on the other hand, does seem a little contrived at times -her somewhat insane and compulsive personality is primarily tied to trauma over her brother's death, and all of her issues are conveniently tied to this one incident. At times, this can come across as somewhat contrived and her personality seems a little over-the-top, but I didn't think it was outrageous enough to harm the novel overall.By the end of this book, I was on the edge of my seat and was almost in tears. The characters and their struggle became so real to me that I wanted to be part of every moment. Though this is not Little Bee, Gold is an excellent novel that delivers an incredibly emotional story with engaging characters.
  • (3/5)
    An enjoyable book although, as I never read the blurb, I didn't realise it involved a child with cancer and, as this appears to be a far too common theme of books that I've read lately, I'm not sure if I would have chosen this book. That said, I found it easy to read and particularly liked the relationship between Zoe and Tom.
  • (4/5)
    Over a week after finishing Chris Cleave's Gold I'm still undecided about it. But with the Olympics starting this weekend, it's still very much in my mind. With only five characters, the story is as intensely focused as the competitions themselves. In, fact, had it not moved with the breathtaking speed of an Olympic race, it would have been stiflingly claustrophobic.It is a surprisingly emotional book, very melodramatic in places. Zoe and the child Sophie are the strongest characters in this story, and they are very different. Zoe is the complete competitor; no price is too high to pay for victory. While we learn her dismal history through flashbacks and conversations, her almost total self-absorption makes her a very unsympathetic character. Considering the number and variety of dirty tricks Zoe has played on Kate, her only serious challenger, the continuing friendship of the women is astonishing. Sophie has the almost preternatural sensitivity of some very sick children to her parents' emotions, and does everything she can to shield them from the unavoidable effects of her sickness and its treatment.Envisioning Kate as a serious competitor on the world stage was difficult for me; she's just too nice. I wonder how many Olympic athletes can focus only on beating their own previous personal best without needing to demonize and demolish the competition? Zoe is baffled early in their acquaintance that Kate seemed to walk 'with a space beside her, leaving room for someone to fill it if they wish.' Zoe, touchy as a cat, walks alone and hisses and spits at those who attempt to befriend her.The author is unquestionably talented, and sometimes I felt that my emotions were being blatantly manipulated. The pacing was excellent, there is a sense of racing ever faster to the finish line. The ending was just unbelievably over the top. So did I enjoy it? I'm still not sure, but know that I won't forget it anytime soon.Note: I received a free review copy of this book.
  • (3/5)
    While I am not a big chick-lit reader, I do enjoy the occasional foray into the genre, and I thought this would be a good one to read because of the Olympics-level racing aspect of the story.And I did enjoy that aspect, especially during this summer of the 2012 Olympics in London. The rest of the story fell flat for me. I couldn't connect with the characters. Sophie's voice as an eight-year old just didn't seem authentic to me, although I did enjoy her Star Wars fantasies. There were cliches and overblown metaphors. But what bothered me most was the soap opera feel to the plot. No spoilers, but I really disliked the last 50 or so pages.This author also wrote "Little Bee", about which I've heard good things, but it if is like this book, it won't be on my to-be-read list.I was given an advance reader's copy of this book for review.
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed Chris Cleave's novel The other hand. Have still to read Incendiary. I like the different subject areas he writes about in his novels this one particularly. It concerns the world of Olympic cycling so it is a good release in this year of the London Olympics. The story of Kate (married to Jack), and Zoe all cyclists and their coach Tom is told in the lead up to the Olympics with flashbacks used to reveal the journey of their relationship up to this time. Both girls are training to make the London olympics. At age 32 it will be their last chance to compete. We are brought deep into their lives and become part of their daily struggles. Kate and Jack have a daughter Sophie who is facing her own fight to win against leukemia, so must balance their desire to win gold against this daily battle. Zoe has demons in her past that have left her with a tremendous desire to win at all cost, often putting friendship with the others to the test.. The friendship between the three has its stresses and strains, and the plot has many twists and turns that kept me guessing as to the end. I became compeltely immersed in this well written book and was racing the races with them. A really good read.
  • (3/5)
    When I first picked this up in an Oxfam bookshop, not having previously heard of the book or the author it was for one reason - the bright kaleidoscope of colour on the cover had sparked my curiosity. I read the blurb inside the dust jacket and was interested in the subject matter, essentially summarised as the physical and mental extremes top flight athletes reach in their training as they follow their quest for Olympic gold. So far so good. Eventually I bought it as the author's previous novels had good reviews from the Guardian, the Independent and the Telegraph; if you can get praise from all three, my thinking went, you must be doing something right. After reading though, my thoughts are more mixed. It is an easy read, and its interesting enough. But to a significant extent, the training serves as a backdrop to the personal lives of the two key characters, cyclists Kate and Zoe. Neither character is entirely believable, and somehow, the way the plot unfurls leaves you with the sense that the author has a formula: think up a new plot twists and insert at regular intervals throughout the book. Fair enough, drama is what makes novels interesting, but the best authors succeed in making such moments appear a natural progression; unfortunately, in this book, they often seem contrived.
  • (5/5)
    I wasn't sure if I would like Chris Cleave's latest book Gold as much as I loved his first book, Little Bee. I was pleasantly surprised to find that he had done it again--written a story that sucked me in with characters that I couldn't stop thinking about. The story revolves around a trio of athletes and their coach. Kate is the speed cyclist who at the beginning of the book is trying not to fall apart while watching Zoe, her friend and rival cyclist compete in the Olympics. The reason Kate is on the couch and Zoe is on the bike is Sophie, the infant daughter of Jack--another speed cyclist who at various times in the book is involved with both Kate and Zoe. All of the characters have life stories explained in flashbacks, but the most interesting is that of Zoe, the driven competitor who at times acts so horribly I wondered why as a reader I had any sympathy for her at all. Yet I was utterly fascinated by her story and how it was all going to play out. Gold would make a great read or listen (the aubiobook version is fantastic) for anyone. It would also be a great pick for a book discussion group--I can't wait to have my group discuss it so we can pick apart the strengths and weaknesses of these characters and why we reacted to them the way that we did.
  • (4/5)
    A circle of elite cyclists and their demons train for the London Olympic team. Kate and Zoe are friends and rivals. Kate is married to Jack, the third of their cycling threesome. All three face hurdles in getting to the Olympics. Zoe is a ruthless competitor who is starting to wonder about the purpose of her life. Kate and Jack's daughter is fighting cancer. Through the books we get the trio's back-history as they train. The writing in this book is technically good, and Cleave does a nice job drawing characters. Still, I found that the book failed to satisfy. At times I found it slow-moving, and the end was too saccharine for my taste. I could see the whole thing being a Lifetime movie. It was interesting to read about how elite athletes experience their bodies, how they are conscious of what every single cell is doing at every moment. That said, there was much more technical information about cycling than could possibly keep my attention.
  • (3/5)
    I loved Chris Cleave's "Little Bee" and was very excited to receive this book. In many ways Cleave did not disappoint - his writing is often extraordinary, and he builds plot tension like a master storyteller. His characters are vivid (even Kate, who is written intentionally to be so bland) and their emotions, triumphs and griefs are real and heart-wrenching. And yet ... this book left much to be desired. I knew nothing about the sport of cycling when I began reading, but I do love to watch the Olympics! Cleave really brings home the intensity of the competition, making the reader intimately aware of the power of a fraction of a second. Kate, Zoe and Jack are friends, lovers, and fierce competitors. They've lived and worked alongside one another since they were 19, and have seen injury, triumph, childbirth and heartbreak affect them on and off the track. Throw into the mix the girls' curmudgeonly coach Tom, and Jack and Kate's daughter Sophia (who is battling a relapse of leukemia) and you get one tense, sleep-deprived and crazed seeming group. Despite some entertaining action and competition, the plot was just a little too contrived, the 'twists' a little too easy to see coming. I still enjoyed reading "Gold", it was engaging and difficult to put down. But it doesn't live up to Cleave's other works, and it definitely doesn't strike gold.
  • (5/5)
    On the surface, GOLD by Chris Cleave is the story of Kate and Zoe and their quest for Olympic gold. Cleave does an amazing job describing the work involved in being an Olympic-caliber athlete, and the physical, emotional, and mental aspects of training and competing at that level. The race scenes are intense, and the writing allows you to immerse yourself in a sport more completely than I thought words possibly could.Cleave is also talented when it comes to drawing characters with his words, and all three of his books have amazed me with his ability to make incredibly damaged and/or challenged people come to life. In GOLD, Zoe isn't just competitive -- her need to win leaves her constantly on the brink of all-out crazy, and even when she wins, she's left empty and still on that precipice.In contrast, Kate wants to be a champion, but is willing to sacrifice her Olympic dream to tend to her daughter, Sophie, who is battling leukemia. There are times when Kate is almost *too* forgiving and self-sacrificing; however, the author interjects just enough flawed and human moments to let her character ring true.Kate and Zoe are the focus of the book, of course, but Sophie's battle with cancer and her methods of handling her disease and her parents made me wish that she could have a book all her own. If GOLD is made into a movie (and I hope it will be), Sophie will be the reason I go check it out on the big screen.Chris Cleave impresses me with his ability to write vastly different books, and write each of them incredibly well. There are few people to whom I would recommend all three of his books, but each is a wonder in its own right. I cannot wait for his next effort.
  • (5/5)
    I read Gold in two sittings, ignoring everything else to get to the end of this fantastic book. Some books are meant to be savored, this one was meant to be read as fast as the cyclists it portrays.Zoe and Kate are described as best friends though this isn't exactly true. They have been competing in races since they were nineteen. The book starts at the Olympics in Athens, where Zoe is competing but Kate is not, she is back in London with her infant baby. We are then fast-forwarded eight years later, Kate and Zoe are on an outing with Kate's husband, Jack who is also a cyclist, and Sophie, their 8 year old daughter who has leukemia. Sophie is obsessed with Star Wars and keeping her parents from knowing how sick she feels so she can avoid seeing worry on their faces and because she wants her mom to make it to the London Olympics.We are then taken back to how Zoe, Kate, and Jack met and the complications in their lives. Kate is competitive but a good person but Zoe is so driven, she does horrible things to mess with Kate's head, wanting to win at all costs. But she always feels terrible because she really cares for Kate. Jack is a catalyst that Zoe has used in the past, but now Kate and Jack are happily married though drained between training and caring for Sophie and trying to stay positive for her.The novel moves back and forth in time, giving us more insight into what is a complex relationship the three of them share and the reasons for Zoe's self-destructiveness.I have never read anything by Chris Cleave before though I knew of his work. He created great characters and a complex back story while moving the story ahead at a fast pace. That isn't easy to do and he did it brilliantly. he even manages to create a a complex character, Tom, the coach of Zoe and Kate and while delving into his psyche, the story doesn't slow for a bit and comes together perfectly. I definitely recommend this novel and I am adding Cleave's other works to my future reads.
  • (4/5)
    The blurb on the book promised much...and, in the main, it delivered. Not quite the heart wrenching, tear jerker I expected, but different, and it taught me things I never knew about cycle racing!The three central characters, Zoe, Kate and her husband Jack are all medal winning track cyclists and the book begins at the 2004 Olympics. The story then moves seamlessly back and forward up to their preparation for the London 2012 Olympics. Kate and Jack's young daughter Sophie has cancer, and the strain it places on Kate's cycling career is well portrayed. Jack and Zoe also have a "past" and there are one or two surprises thrown up in the plotline because of this. I also enjoyed Sophie's "alternative world" where she went to avoid upsetting Mummy and Daddy and prevent them from seeing how much she suffered. She is a wonderful character, much older and wiser than her young years. Of particular note is Tom, Zoe and Kate's coach, a tough, but caring man who has to make a decision that tears him apart.I didn't expect to enjoy the details of track cycling and the "mind games" involved in the events, but I was pleasantly surprised and will be watching the cycling at the UK velodrome in July with great interest as a result....sadly on the couch at home...like most of us! Was it what I expected when I ordered the book? No it wasn't. In truth it's a book about cycle racing and the drama and relationship struggles took silver in this particular event. It promised to make me cry....it didn't, but it was well written and a pretty good read just the same.
  • (5/5)
    I discovered this book in my library's 'New' shelf, and I have to admit that I wasn't sold on either the cover or the blurb. However, seeing that the Olympics are underway, I decided to take a chance. I am so glad that I did!Cleave's Gold tells the story of two, British women who are both completing for gold medals in cycling for the 2012 Olympics. Kate, a sweet-tempered but driven young woman, was forced to miss the previous Olympics due to a family medical emergency, and she is desperate to make this last attempt at the gold. Her frenemy, Zoe, a hard-core, hard-bitten contender who lets nothing stand in her way, is also determined to win the gold at all costs. Although the two women have a shared history of victories, they are also locked in competition, not only for the gold medal, but also for the love of Jack, another Olympic cyclist.I was hooked on this story from the very first page. The characters are so well depicted, and the tension so compelling that I didn't want to put the book down. Cleave is a masterful story teller, and his descriptions are vivid without being boring. Had I been reading this book on my Kindle, I would have wanted to underline nearly every sentence. The story is deceptively simple, and it takes many unexpected turns. I worried that the outcome would either be too syrupy sweet or too dismal and dark, yet Cleave managed to give me an extremely satisfying conclusion that rang true.The one quibble I had, however, was that although Zoe did many terrible things to both Kate and Jack in her pursuit of the gold, they not only forgave her, they continued their friendships with her. Personally, I would have told Zoe to get lost after the first time she messed with me. Strangely, Zoe reminded me a great deal of Lisbeth Salander, the heroine from The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo books. (Although, I liked Salander a great deal more for some reason).In my opinion, what separates literature from fiction is literature's ability to make me see things in a new way. And this book definitely does that. Never before had I considered the amount of sacrifice it takes to become an Olympic athlete. After reading this book, however, I have a much stronger appreciation for those who are competing in the Olympics. I am definitely reading more of Cleave's books.
  • (3/5)
    A one-two-three punch to the gut and an adrenaline-fueled fast read. I wish there was a .5 to add above the five stars. But admittedly, the question behind the writing, "why and how do we make our choices for ambition versus family," is one that I have been ruminating on for a couple of decades. When family has shaped every choice you've ever made to the point where you wonder who you really are, this book carries nuclear power. I bawled my way through the last two chapters, but really, I'm fine now. I've had a couple of days to chill. LOVED this book! How Chris Cleave writes women so well? One can only wonder.
  • (3/5)
    About two female British cyclists as they prepare for the London Olympics and their relationships with each other, their coach, and families. It was a good page turner for traveling, but not quite satisfying.