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Leichenblässe (Gekürzte Fassung)

Leichenblässe (Gekürzte Fassung)

Geschrieben von Simon Beckett

Erzählt von Johannes Steck


Leichenblässe (Gekürzte Fassung)

Geschrieben von Simon Beckett

Erzählt von Johannes Steck

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (10 Bewertungen)
Länge:
7 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
1. Jan. 2013
ISBN:
9783839890431
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Bei seinem letzten Einsatz ist der Forensiker David Hunter nur knapp dem Tode entronnen. Von einer vollständigen Genesung weit entfernt, quält ihn die Frage, ob er seinem Beruf noch gewachsen ist. Hunter sagt alle neuen Aufträge ab und beschließt, die Body Farm in Tennessee aufzusuchen - eine bekannte Akademie, an der er sein Handwerk erlernte. Dort trifft Hunter einen alten Freund, den er bei den Ermittlungen im Fall eines sadistischen Mordes unterstützen soll ...
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
1. Jan. 2013
ISBN:
9783839890431
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor


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Was die anderen über Leichenblässe (Gekürzte Fassung) denken

4.3
10 Bewertungen / 14 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (5/5)
    Beckett's books get better and better. In this third book Dr. David Hunter travels to the Body Farm in Tennessee for a brief reprieve from his past adventures. However, he ends up walking right into another dire situation that challenges everything he knows. It is a tale filled with lots of twists that keep the reader guessing as to what will happen next. I can't wait for the next book.
  • (5/5)
    Dr David Hunter is in Tennessee at the Body Farm trying to decide if he can continue his career in forensic anthropology. His accompanies his mentor Dr Tom Lieberman to a grisly and bizarre crime scene in the Smoky Mountains. Now they are involved in the search for a serial killer. This was a fascinating read varied in the details and with many twists and turns. I did not see the killer's face until he was unmasked. Oooh I liked it.
  • (3/5)
    Very easy read, seems to lack substance, but entertaining
  • (4/5)
    There are several things to like about the third book in the Dr. David Hunter series. The plot is very interesting and the tension runs high, particularly toward the end. You become involved and begin to feel that you "see where this is going". And sometimes you are right on and sometimes the story takes an unanticipated 90 degree turn. I was particularly looking forward to this book because the author chose to end the previous book with a cliffhanger. Throughout the first quarter of Whispers of the Dead then we are given bits and pieces to explain what happened subsequently. A well done for that whole treatment and a scratch of the head as to why more series authors don't occasionally employ a similar device - too campy? Not if it's done well, and (duh !) you are writing a series, afterall. Anyway, the only disappoinment I had with this book was the characters, big time. A key female is characterized in a very cliched way. Hunter, a Brit, is in the US on training/sabattical at a research facility in the Knoxville area and a number of local characters treat our somewhat wimpy hero in a very un-American, unwelcoming, grumpy fashion. And it went on and on throughout the book - it became annoying and distracting because it is not an accurate portrayal of a typical American reaction to a visitor, particularly a foreign one, whether it's at Disneyland or a crime scene. Disappointing, took a lot away from the book for me.
  • (3/5)
    The third book in the David Hunter series and not quite up to the standard of the first two in my opinion. This time Hunter is on a working visit to a Tennessee "Body Farm" research facility when a serial killer strikes and he becomes embroiled in the investigation and subsequent autopsies. Like the other Hunter books not one for the squeamish.
  • (5/5)
    This was my third Beckett and as the two beforehand I enjoyed the reading very much. It is fast-paced and enthralling and kept me guessing until the very last page who is the evil one. David Hunter has left his British ground to join his friend in Tennessee. This trip should help him to recover and to pick up his courage for his work back in England. Although he was forced to vault his shadow his inquisitiveness to help solving the case was much bigger. He's got strength to help others and has found back his gut instinct on which he always can rely.
  • (4/5)
    I am a huge fan of mysteries/thrillers & always on the lookout for a good new series. With Whispers of the Dead I just found one. I haven't read Beckett's other two books (Written in Bone & The Chemistry of Death), but I just checked to make sure my public library had copies of both so I can go grab 'em the next time I'm there (they do).I liked the main character, forensic anthropologist David Hunter, & all the rest of the characters, too. Beckett's writing is clear & clean & his plotting is excellent. Plenty of forensic details, plenty of suspense, plenty of bodies. Great atmosphere & an interesting villain in a story with a number of unusual & cool twists made this a great read. Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    The story was disturbing but hard to put down. I hated the psychopathic killer and the story was over the top and unrealistic, but the author made me care about the people and built the suspense, adding twists at the end. British forensic scientist David Hunter visits the body farm in Tennessee and gets embroiled in a case involving a serial killer. Good story.
  • (3/5)
    This book is the weakest of the previous two. The usualserial killer stuff...pretty graphic in parts. Lots of false clues, but I did not find it to be a gripping read. I did find info onthe Body Farm to be interesting. I would prefer to have these bookstake place in England. Would read more by this author
  • (3/5)
    READ IN DUTCH

    Oh, this one was creepy. I can't exactly explain why (except for the very obvious reasons), and normally I read everything without a single blink. But I couldn't keep that up this time. Maybe it was the extreme body count, I'm still not sure.

    I did like the book, it was an easy reading suspense novel. My first book by Simon Beckett, but afterwards I also read The Chemistry of Death, his first book. I would recommend this to anyone who has a strong stomache, that probably will help.

    And, who would donate his body to a body farm?!
  • (4/5)
    Though David Hunter has physically mostly recovered from a grave injury, his confidence and trust in his professional instincts are still very shaky. So he accept an invitation from his colleague and mentor Tom Lieberman to join him at the Body Farm for a while. In this environment he should be able to ease back into his field of work, forensic anthropology. When a consult job from the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation comes up, he asks David to come along. Reluctantly at first, David joins the investigation and as the pace picks up, so does Davids confidence return. Into the narrative of the investigation are interspersed burst of thought by the killer.
    A good addition to the series.
  • (4/5)
    4 stars. This was an enjoyable book but I didn't manage to identify the killer! As usual the book had many twists.Whilst it was very enjoyable I did prefer the first two bokks in the series. However I look forward to completing the series very soon, although I will be sad to say goodbye to Dr David Hunter.
  • (5/5)
    Dr, David Hunter, recovering from wounds he received in his last case, is working as a visiting specialist at the Tennessee lab better known as The Body Farm. Hunter, who has lost his self-confidence and is melancholy about the ending of a relationship, is enjoying his scientific investigations under the guidance of Tom Liebermann, the director. In this strange facility, people who have donated their bodies to scientific research are left outside after their deaths and the decomposition of their corpses is studied by scientists, with the aim of improving future forensic investigations.

    All is going reasonably well for David when a body in an advanced stage of decomposition is discovered in a remote cabin in the woods nearby. The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation (TBI), led by Dan Gardner, don’t want Hunter involved in their investigation. Liebermann is nearing retirement age and suffers from a heart condition, so he insists that Hunter be involved in the analysis of the body. It quickly become apparent they are on the track of a serial killer, one who always seems to be one step ahead and who has unusually detailed knowledge of forensic pathology.

    I thought the first half of the book was a bit slow but once it got rolling I thought the story was very compelling and the tension high. This is the third book in the Dr. David Hunter series and can easily be read as a standalone. I definitely plan to read the final (currently published) book, The Calling of the Grave.
  • (4/5)
    This is the 3rd book in the David Hunter series. I have enjoyed this series very much and this book is a nice addition. It has everything you could ask for in a thriller: mystery, suspense, atmosphere, great plot and interesting characters. It kept the pages turning until the very end. One thing I like about Beckett's books is the twists and turns he takes you through. It's very difficult to guess the killer in his books. If you like forensics mixed in with you thrillers, then I suggest you try Simon Beckett's David Hunter series.