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Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy

Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy

Geschrieben von David D. Burns, M.D.

Erzählt von George Newbern


Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy

Geschrieben von David D. Burns, M.D.

Erzählt von George Newbern

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (142 Bewertungen)
Länge:
13 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Mar 21, 2017
ISBN:
9780062686909
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

BuchSchnappschuss

Auch als verfügbar...

BuchSchnappschuss

Beschreibung

The good news is that anxiety, guilt, pessimism, procrastination, low self-esteem, and other 'black holes' of depression can be cured without drugs. In Feeling Good, eminent psychiatrist David D. Burns, M.D. outlines the remarkable, scientifically proven techniques that will immediately lift your spirits and help you develop a positive outlook on life.

Now, in this updated edition, Dr Burns adds an all-new Consumer's Guide To Antidepressant Drugs, as well as a new introduction to help answer your questions about the many options available for treating depression.

Recognise what causes your mood swings.

Nip negative feelings in the bud.

Deal with guilt.

Handle hostility and criticism.

Overcome addiction to love and approval.

Build self-esteem.

Feel good everyday.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Mar 21, 2017
ISBN:
9780062686909
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

BuchSchnappschuss


Über den Autor

David D. Burns, M.D., a clinical psychiatrist, conveys his ideas with warmth, compassion, understanding, and humor unmatched by any other writer in the self-help field. His bestselling Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy has sold more than three million copies to date. In a recent national survey of mental health professionals, Feeling Good was rated number one—from a list of more than one thousand—as the most frequently recommended self-help book on depression. His Feeling Good Handbook was rated number two in the same survey. Dr. Burns's entertaining teaching style has made him a popular lecturer for general audiences and mental health professionals throughout the country as well as a frequent guest on national radio and television programs. He has received numerous awards including the Distinguished Contribution to Psychology Through the Media Award from the Association of Applied and Preventive Psychology. A magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Amherst College, Dr. Burns received his medical degree from the Stanford University School of Medicine. He is currently clinical associate professor of psychiatry at the Stanford University School of Medicine and is certified by the National Board of Psychiatry and Neurology.

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Was die anderen über Feeling Good denken

4.3
142 Bewertungen / 18 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (5/5)
    A must read to control your negative thought and have a better life
  • (5/5)
    You absolutely must read if struggling in any way.
  • (4/5)
    Overall a good read with lots of practical concepts which I will definitely try moving forward .
    For my purposes there was a lot of information about antidepressants and I would have preferred more of the practical advice .
  • (5/5)
    The best book and info on overcoming depression and other negative thoughts and feelings.
  • (5/5)
    Amazing !! it worked perfectly for me, I just had to follow the steps, thank you very much for sharing the Book.
  • (5/5)
    A very interesting point of view of self help. Strictly scientific. Methods to overcome lies we tell ouserlves.
  • (4/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    This is good, really good. So why did I not finish it? There's so many examples and so many things possible to do it just exhausted me and started making me think I needed to do everything or I wouldn't heal, so I got stressed and overwhelmed myself. No fault of the book, but I do wish it was more digestible and introduced one thing at a time instead of 10. I'll perhaps return to this book once I try other books of this genre that I hope are easier to get started on my journey. There's also all kind of exercises once can find on Google, just by typing cognitive behavior therapy, so I think giving those a go and then diving deeper when one feels needs a push or more help to heal is the ideal course. For me, of course, and people like me that get easily overwhelmed or stressed because they want perfection or feel fear from missing out.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (2/5)
    Good points but too much detail included. Would prefer it simpler.
  • (5/5)
    I think there's a lot of truth in this take on psychology. All of us run "scripts" in our heads. Naturally if you put yourself down, keep saying in your mind that a situation is hopeless, the emotions will follow. At the same time this isn't a book of trite affirmations where you chant, "I am awesome." But it does point out that while you can't always control your situation, particularly other people--you can to some extent control what you think about it, and thus how you feel about it. To that end he identifies unhealthy habits of mind such as All-or-Nothing Thinking, Overgeneralization, Mental Filter (negativism), Disqualifying the Positive, Jumping to Conclusions, The Fortune Teller Error, Magnification and Minimization, Emotional Reasoning (Feelings are not facts), Should Statements ("I should ____"), Labeling and Mislabeling, Personalization ("It's my fault!"). The rest is elaborations, explanations and exercises, but that's it in a nutshell. And no, you're not going to end depression just by reading it--you have to put it into practice. Just as you don't gain muscles by just reading a book about weight training. And some people may need more--therapy, medication. But I do find learning about the common distortions in thinking and more rational responses does help.The best book and info on overcoming depression and other negative thoughts and feelings.
    Thank you.
  • (5/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    The narration was excellent. The narrator came across as though he were a counselor through tone and cadence. I’ve applied a few of the suggestions for changing thoughts and I have felt better not only due to more positive thoughts but also the confidence that the tools available to me work.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (1/5)
    I have suffered with major depression for many years. I know for a fact that, for me, I'm not depressed because of negative thinking. Major Depressive Disorder is a real thing, and this man's entire premise is wrong. Still looking for someone who understands and can help. Or even just understands.
  • (5/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    Say you are depressed. Food doesn't taste good, the skies are always gray, you're sleeping badly and carrying a lump of lead in your chest all day every day. Take David Burns's well-researched and highly effective book daily for six weeks, and call me in the morning. Cognitive-behavioral approach works brilliantly with medication and therapy, but can also be surprisingly effective on its own. You heard it here first.I have given away so many of these books! My daughter snagged this one at a book sale, and I'm hoping I can keep it at least for a few weeks.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (4/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    Even if you don't agree with all (or even many) of the postulates of cognitive behavior therapy (i.e the dismissal of painful emotions as nothing more than the consequences of negative thoughts, the complete disregard of the role of trauma and developmental factors in the origin of mood disorders etc. ) and are willing to overlook those points, helpful techniques and advice can be found in this book. I especially loved the narrator's voice and convincing, confident recital. I looked him up because I just couldn't believe it wasn't the author or at least another psychotherapist reading! Really well done.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (2/5)

    5 Leute fanden das hilfreich

    I separate discussion of this book into two parts: general life philosophy versus treatment for depression, which I will deal with later. One over-arching statement that I would make is that Burns (and a lot of other social science experts) would benefit greatly from reading up on evolutionary psychology and game theory. Even if one doesn't accept that much of psychology is inborn and universal, they provide insight into the social uses, such as the maintainance of reciprocity, of "shoulds", should-nots" and retaliation. General Life Philosophy On the positive side, everyone needs a certain amount of what this book is peddling, that is, the ability to intellectualize and gain objectivity about one's feelings. I do think, from experience, that one can learn a certain amount of desirable control over one's emotions but it is a lot of work, and calling it "choosing" one's emotions is too glib and flip. Unfortunately, it is possible to do this too much, and while this is exactly what some people need, I think that it might be disastrous for people who have weak "boundaries" or problems with assertiveness. It cuts the ground from under their feet by claiming that they have no right to expect certain things from other people, like fidelity from a spouse or consideration from other family members. I suspect that this would effectively prevent them from doing anything to solve their problems other than effacing themselves. Although he would deny it, Burns is saying that anyone who is angry, sad, hurt, etc., is the problem, there is never anything justification for their feelings. Therefore, the solution is always to change one's feelings, not one's situation. Burns gives the example of someone who is feeling dissed because he is getting bad service in a restaurant. Burns helps him understand that the waiter may be distracted, and therefore the patron shouldn't take it personally. That's fine as far as it goes, but what if the diner isn't feeling dissed, just hungry? I would recommend asking what happened to the order, not sitting there trying to convince oneself that it is unreasonable to expect a restaurant to serve a meal. He also ignores the relationship between the interacting parties. It's fine to ignore a pushy stranger that one may never see again. A bully that one has to work with needs to be dealt with. Sometimes, one needs to learn to harness negative emotions to create the drive to make situational changes. Further, to me, although I presume not to Burns, there is a difference between accepting that one must make the best of a bad and unchangeable situation and asserting that there is no such thing as a bad situation, just bad reactions. One might decide, for various reasons, not to divorce an unfaithful spouse, but that doesn't mean that they are not behaving badly, or that one does not have the right to decide to end the relationship. This book then has a very common problem: the assumption that there is one solution to life's problems that works in all situations and for all people. Another problem with these systems of dealing with interpersonal behavior is that they are rarely universal and obvious. They may work fine if all the interactors share the same assumptions and follow the same etiquette. Otherwise, the person/people using the system need to recognize that only they have decided to make this change and the reactions of others are yet to be determined. I suspect that if one unilaterally practiced Burns' advice, one would end up taking complete responsibility for all of one's relationships, since Burns argues that if one is unhappy, it is because of bad thoughts that one needs to eliminate. Meanwhile, everyone else is free to assert their wants/needs. This idea of "other people don't make you angry (sad, happy, etc.), you make yourself angry, etc.," also implicitly says that people's reactions are totally unpredicatable and one cannot learn ways of behaving toward other people that are more effective. There are, and I suspect, have to be, social norms for interpersonal conduct, however ambiguous and contradictory they may sometimes be. In a society like this, people are generally held to be free to renegotiate private arrangements, but I don't think that societies and relationships can function without expectations. In fact, if one refrains from gratuitously insulting people and learns to share, one will probably get along better with other people. It is certainly tricky deciding/negotiating what is a reasonable expectation, but I don't think that this book helps. Along this line, I dislike the book's amorality. I gather by Burns' remarks that I am not the first person to suggest this, but if our distress over a partner's infidelity is caused by our "choice" to be upset, not by their action, then it logically follows that it doesn't matter how we behave. The reaction of other people is their "choice" and how are we to know how they will react? If we mug someone, then it is their "choice" to be upset at being injured and robbed, why should we be hauled into court? I have also found that no-one I know who spouts this philosophy actually lives it. The trainer who was supposed to be teaching my office to get along better through these techniques threw a tantrum when someone asked a "disrespectful" question that I thought was very germane. If a person does not personally live by this advice, it may seem rather callous when it is recited to other people. Dealing with Depression I can well believe that this book can be very helpful for people dealing with anxiety: maybe they can learn not to worry about what may never happen. As to dealing with depression, the supposed focus of this book, I don't think that this will help for serious cases. Burns tells us that one of his patients simply got up and ran out of his office without saying good-bye. He was puzzled by this, but I find it perfectly understandable. Yes, this kind of thing and various other little tricks can help when one is a little down or in a funk or feeling whiny or slightly anxious. This type of thinking sometimes depresses me further since it could be taken as implying that if I am not happy now, I never will be. Moreover, I am skeptical that severe depression results from the kind of "negative" thinking that Burns is dealing with here. Burns has now started including discussions of psychoactive drugs in his books, which I consider to be a sort of admission that this is true. The reader might also want to consult Alan Downs' The Half-Empty Heart: A Supportive Guide to Breaking Free from Chronic Discontent, which focuses on dysthymia, chronic or minor depression, which Downs call chronic discontent. In his appendix, he argues that studies have shown that cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) such as Burns recomends is not effective since dysthymia rises from an inability to handle the emotions of relationships, not from self-defeating beliefs.

    5 Leute fanden das hilfreich

  • (5/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    I love both the Feeling Good books; reading them has helped me through depressed days more than any other therapeutic resource.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (5/5)

    4 Leute fanden das hilfreich

    This book came recommended to me by a therapist. This is THE consumer-level book for Cognitive Behavior Therapy. The basic premise behind this school of therapy, is that thoughts lead to feelings, and feelings lead to thoughts, causing a feedback loop. If you change your thoughts, your feelings will also change.This has been as successful as medication in clinical treatments for depression and anxiety.I didn't even have to finish this book to find relief. I identified the negative thoughts and self-images I had (one by one because there were many) replacing them with positive thoughts. Most of the depression/anxiety went away quickly. Over the years, I've had to find the more subtle, clandestine thoughts, and replace them, too.A great book, recommended to anyone suffering from chronic emotional pain.

    4 Leute fanden das hilfreich

  • (4/5)

    3 Leute fanden das hilfreich

    It's a helpful at dealing with depression and/or anxiety. Plus, some of what Burns discusses is how to avoid overgeneralization, all or nothing thinking, and perfectionism. His cure for dealing with perfectionism is striving to be average. This is a challenge for me, yet I discovered it makes life less stressful, and I feel better.

    3 Leute fanden das hilfreich

  • (4/5)

    3 Leute fanden das hilfreich

    This therapy is grounded in a theory of psychology that at the root of emotional troubles are distorted thinking. Untwist the thinking, the rest follows. I think there's a lot of truth in this take on psychology. All of us run "scripts" in our heads. Naturally if you put yourself down, keep saying in your mind that a situation is hopeless, the emotions will follow. At the same time this isn't a book of trite affirmations where you chant, "I am awesome." But it does point out that while you can't always control your situation, particularly other people--you can to some extent control what you think about it, and thus how you feel about it. To that end he identifies unhealthy habits of mind such as All-or-Nothing Thinking, Overgeneralization, Mental Filter (negativism), Disqualifying the Positive, Jumping to Conclusions, The Fortune Teller Error, Magnification and Minimization, Emotional Reasoning (Feelings are not facts), Should Statements ("I should ____"), Labeling and Mislabeling, Personalization ("It's my fault!"). The rest is elaborations, explanations and exercises, but that's it in a nutshell. And no, you're not going to end depression just by reading it--you have to put it into practice. Just as you don't gain muscles by just reading a book about weight training. And some people may need more--therapy, medication. But I do find learning about the common distortions in thinking and more rational responses does help.

    3 Leute fanden das hilfreich