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Schachnovelle ( (Ungekürzte Fassung)

Schachnovelle ( (Ungekürzte Fassung)

Geschrieben von Stefan Zweig

Erzählt von Christoph Maria Herbst


Schachnovelle ( (Ungekürzte Fassung)

Geschrieben von Stefan Zweig

Erzählt von Christoph Maria Herbst

Bewertungen:
4/5 (26 Bewertungen)
Länge:
2 Stunden
Freigegeben:
1. Jan. 2013
ISBN:
9783866105348
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Auf einem Passagierdampfer, der von New York nach Buenos Aires unterwegs ist, fordert ein Millionär gegen Honorar den mit einer Art mechanischer Präzision spielenden Schachweltmeister Mirko Czentovic zu einer Partie heraus. Der mitreisende Dr. B., ein österreichischer Emigrant, greift beratend ein und erreicht so ein Remis für den Herausforderer. Er hat sich, von der Gestapo, die ihn verhaftete, in ein Hotelzimmer gesperrt und von der Außenwelt hermetisch abgeschlossen, monatelang mit dem blinden Spiel von 150 Partien beschäftigt, um sich so seine intellektuelle Widerstandskraft zu erhalten. Durch diese einseitige geistige Anstrengung ergriff ihn ein Nervenfieber, dessentwegen man ihn entließ. Jetzt spielt Dr. B. zum ersten Mal wieder gegen einen tatsächlichen, freilich roboterhaft reagierenden Gegner. Es geht ihm bei dieser Partie lediglich darum, festzustellen, ob sein Tun damals während seiner Haft noch Spiel oder bereits Wahnsinn gewesen ist. Er schlägt den Weltmeister in der ersten Partie souverän, läßt sich aber, eigentlich gegen seinen Willen, auf eine Revanche ein. Während dieser zweiten Partie ergreift ihn wieder das Nervenfieber: er bricht die Partie ab und wird nie wieder ein Schachbrett berühren.
Freigegeben:
1. Jan. 2013
ISBN:
9783866105348
Format:
Hörbuch

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4.1
26 Bewertungen / 35 Rezensionen
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  • (4/5)
    This little novella is a lot of things - a study of torture and PTSD, a confrontation between very different characters with a shared interest, a masterpiece of prose. Two masters of chess meet each other, and although one of them - the Austrian Dr. B who achieved his mastery by studying famous matches in order to deal with his solitary confinement - gets much more page time, these characters have some striking similarities in the way they're damaged and are unable to function well in society. How obsessed does one have to be to achieve that kind of mastery, what is lost during the process, and how aware can one be of this loss? Not much is happening in this story, and still it's an amazing read.
  • (4/5)
    The Book Report: Lumpenproletarian chess prodigy Czentovic, a boorish and unsympathetic figure, meets noble Jewish Dr. B. on a cruise. The good doctor is escaping the Nazis after a horrific torture-by-isolation. Czentovic is off to new triumphs as the world's greatest living chess master. Dr. B. survived his horrible isolation by reading and re-reading and memorizing and repeatedly playing in his mind great chess games from a book he stole from one of his torturers. The stage is set...the grisly Grand Master meets the gruesomely treated noble spirit in a chess battle for the ages, and is defeated. The doctor retires from the scene, completely unmanned by reliving his horrible confinement through his victory over the taciturn, unintelligent idiot savant Czentovic.My Review: Zweig committed suicide after completing this book. I see why. It's the least optimistic, most hopeless, depressing, and horrifyingly bleak thing I've read in years. Four hankies won't do to stanch the helpless, hopeless weeping induced by reading the book, and a pistol is too heavy to hold in fingers gone too numb to clench even slightly.It's one long flashback. The "action" of the chess match takes on an almost lurid and pornographic tinge after the grim tale Dr. B. tells of his time with the Nazis. It's dreadful. It's downbeat. It stinks of freshly-opened coffins and crematory ovens. If there is a redeeming value in having read it, it's that one need never, ever, ever touch it again, and I ASSURE you I will not.
  • (4/5)
    Well written story about man obsessed with chess. Previously saw a play based on this book, and that made the story more vivid for me.
  • (5/5)
    The psychological game between the inhuman chess automaton Czentovic and the fragile Dr. B., who was imprisoned by the Gestapo for months in solitary confinement and still feels the psychological effects of torture and suffers from it, makes it clear how important human consciousness is for our lives and what dangers it poses is. The main themes of the chess novella are: "Chess as a war", "Hitler and the Nazi period", "Dr. B.'s fate "," Dr. B. against Czentovic "," The Psychological Game "and" Isolation and Chess Poisoning ".Even though the book does not have many pages, there is a linguistic variety of sentence structure and vocabulary in which one can not find his own again so quickly. [[Stefan Zweig]] was a virtuoso in terms of language.This is a must-read for me.
  • (3/5)
    Leuke, intens geschreven novelle over een ultiem schaakspel tussen de Hongaarse lichtautistische wereldkampioen, en een toevallige passant op een pakketboot, die de schaakmeester 1 keer verslaat maar dan bezwijkt onder de druk. "Onschuldig" verbonden met de Gestapopraktijken van het Naziregime. Gaat eigenlijk over obsessie.
  • (3/5)
    Leuke, intens geschreven novelle over een ultiem schaakspel tussen de Hongaarse lichtautistische wereldkampioen, en een toevallige passant op een pakketboot, die de schaakmeester 1 keer verslaat maar dan bezwijkt onder de druk. "Onschuldig" verbonden met de Gestapopraktijken van het Naziregime. Gaat eigenlijk over obsessie.
  • (4/5)
    Well told entertaining story with some interesting information on pre-war nazist methods and torture technique.
  • (4/5)
    A quick read and one that is riveting from the get-go. Zweig can certainly relate a good story. His tone, always for me, is one as if a very close and trusted friend is sitting in a chair in front of me and letting me into something important I may not have known or heard of lately. Quite a talent. I read a different translation than this book, a collection of his shorter works, and titled The Royal Game.
  • (3/5)
    This book is intended for adults but would be suitable for teens to read. The novella deals with literary tropes and ideas that would be discussed in any high school English class.
  • (5/5)
    This is short. Very short: I read it in about an hour. Yet Zweig packs the story with detail without revealing too much, and keeps the suspense flowing right until the end. The story is set on a liner, making a journey from New York to Buenos Aires, and runs at a fast pace from the start. The protraits of the two main characters are sketched in detail building up to the climactic encounter between them at the end of the book. These two character sketches are no mere interludes, though, and form in many ways the meat of the work, particularly the second, in which the enigmatically named Dr. B recounts his history to the narrator. The tension and psychological dramas built up in this way provide the impetus for the final scene and a brilliant ending for the work as a whole
  • (5/5)
    "But is it not already an insult to call chess anything so narrow as a game? Is it not also a science, an art, hovering between these categories like Mohammad's coffin between heaven and earth, a unique yoking of opposites, ancient and yet eternally new, mechanically constituted and yet an activity of imagination alone, limited to a fixed geometric area but unlimited in its permutations, constantly evolving and yet sterile, a cogitation producing nothing, a mathematics calculating nothing, an art without an artwork, an architecture without substance and yet demonstrably more durable in its essence and actual form than all books and works, the only game that belongs to all peoples and all eras, while no one knows what god put it on earth to deaden boredom, sharpen the mind, and fortify the spirit?"A world champion chess player is among the passengers on a ship traveling from New York to Buenos Aires. One of the passengers hopes to learn more about this enigmatic champion but soon discovers that the only way to observe him up close is to challenge him to a game of chess - for a price of $250 per game. Another passenger is willing to pay the fee and thus the champion, Czentovic, agrees to play against the rest of the passengers - they will be allowed ten minutes to confer for each move. After losing the first game, the passenger team is interrupted during a move in the second game by a mysterious man who appears to be just what they need - a chess master. Between the second and third games, the narrator of the story learns the backstory of the mysterious man who knows so much about chess. It turns out that he was once a prisoner of the Third Reich. How does he know so much about chess and why is he so hesitant to face the champion alone for the third game?At a mere 84 pages, this book is small, but its story is not. The writing is beautiful and will draw you in from the very first pages and keep you entranced until the last. I had not read anything by this author before, but I will be reading him again.
  • (5/5)
    a fast moving novella about a chess match between 2 unlikely masters. One is an idiot savant who has an inate ability to learn chess while being almost illiterate about all else. He becomes the world champion and soon develops an air of supremacy and conceit. All is good for him until he takes a fateful ship cruise on its way to Buenos Aires. Aboard the ship is another chess master who learned the game while imprisoned in solitary confinement and all he had to maintain his sanity was a chess manual he memorized and the games within played out in his mind with no chess board nor peices.the ensuing match betwenn these two is compelling, narrated quickly with good pace and characterization. this is the 1st Zweig piece i have read and i am sure to look at his other stories.
  • (5/5)
    Another stellar psychological treatise by Stefan Zweig! This novella offers the reader a powerful glimpse into the world of obsession and monomania. The manuscript was found in 1942 in the author's home in Brazil after he and his wife committed suicide, and the reader cannot help but wonder if this insightful interior scrutiny reflected some of the suffering of Zweig prior to his death. The primary themes include: the power of obsession, the power of solitude, and the ability of both to destroy the psyche. Clearly there is a treatise on Hitler and his monomania in this story as well. All in 84 pages!
  • (5/5)
    during world war II, passengers on a ship en route to Argentina discover that on board with them is a world chess champion. he is taciturn, haughty, and unfriendly but for a price, allowed himself to be challenged to a game against a wealthy passenger and some amateur chess lovers. with nary an effort on his part, his opponents lose one game to the next -- that is, until a mysterious passenger spoke up in the middle of one game telling the amateurs what moves they had to make. the game resulted in a draw -- and there the story begins. Dr. B, the mysterious man, reveals his identity to the narrator and tells him how he came to possess his extraordinary ability in the game, and the price he had to pay to gain it. therein lies the heart of this short but powerful work -- the resistance as well as the vulnerability of the human mind in the face of extreme ordeal, and how tyranny scars forever those it manages to avoid killing. spare in prose, the effect is visceral as the intense psychological drama builds up to an almost painful end. stunning and unforgettable, i highly recommend this!
  • (5/5)
    The action in this novella takes place during World War II, on a cruise ship heading from NYC to Buenos Aires. On board is the world chess champion Mirko Czentovic, who is on tour to play the best chessmasters of South America. The nameless narrator is intrigued by Czentovic, a monomaniac whose aloof manner hides the fact that he is an otherwise ignorant and uneducated peasant. In an effort to meet Czentovic, the narrator plays chess with an arrogant and wealthy businessman, who ultimately persuades Czentovic to play him for money. The game is witnessed by many of the passengers, and Czentovic handily trounces the businessman in several games. However, a stranger provides tactical advice to the businessman, who manages to battle the champion to a draw. Czentovic challenges the stranger, Dr. B., to a game the following day, and the narrator is able to learn more about Dr. B's dark secret, and how he was able to match the champion even though he had not played chess in over two decades. The battle royale takes place the next afternoon, and is both a tactical and psychological battle of wills.Unfortunately this was the last published complete work by Zweig, a Jew who fled his native Austria before the Nazi occupation, and committed suicide with his wife in 1942, due to his despair with the demise of European culture under the Nazis. It is a brilliant work, and is highly recommended.
  • (3/5)
    A little piece of brain candy. There's some shadowy allegory of fascism and totalitarianism in here, although the mental drama and the battlefields of chess are exciting reads.
  • (4/5)
    This book kind of makes you go, oh shit man! So if you like that kind of thing, I would guess you might like it. It is very suspenseful and mysterious and WEIGHTY. The central action is around a match-off between two characters one of whom (peasant, generally dull but sly like a fox!) is a chess master but can only play with the physical pieces in front of him for some weird idiot-savant reason. The other (relic of the currently-being-decimated European aristocracy, sensitive, cultured, anxious, tortured) has (for HORRIFIC reasons) only played chess in his own mind, against himself, and never on an actual board against another opponent. Look out when these two face off, because it might be an allegory or something. Anyway, I actually really liked this book. I'll probably regret saying this when I'm not drunk, but it is kind of like The Magic Mountain if that were more of a thriller.
  • (5/5)
    This is a book about totalitarianism, strategy and the control of the mind. The story is plotted like a game of chess, with moves and counter moves, resolving into a formal check mate. It is a tale of high melodrama on the high seas. The idea of chess itself does not fare well in the story - it is portrayed as a somewhat pointless source of madness and escape that even the most dull human being can grasp.The book is full of sharp, incisive ideas.
  • (4/5)
    Excellent story that I found strangely relatable. The version I read had a forward by Peter Gay that I recommend being read after the text--or not at all. It only provided spoilers without adding much backward to the work. I also think chess players would enjoy this book more than non-chess players. Although the game is used mostly as a vehicle.
  • (4/5)
    This is a fascinating book. It starts off innocently enough with a description of the Chess champion. It starts innocently enough with a description of the first game, and the history of the bystander. Then, when the duel between the champion and the bystander starts, the book gets really fascinatingThe mental duel has been described brilliantly, and the manner in which the champion wears down his opponent is brilliant. The moves that his opponent studied while in jail are brilliant in their execution, yet theoretical knowledge cannot by itself compete with mental toughness and mind games of the real world.The book captures the tension and the ultimate breakdown brilliantly. Highly recommended
  • (4/5)
    Beautiful novella. I'm always interested in stories that feature games, and Chess Story is definitely a good example of that. Two different men - a chess grandmaster and a nobody - meet at a chess board and the results are... explosive. Much of the book is devoted to the extraordinary background of the Dr. B, his experiences in the Nazi-occupied Austria. Magical book.
  • (5/5)
    The entire action of this brief, taut novella takes place over the course of a few days a cruise ship from New York to Buenos Aires. Ultimately, it portrays the battle of two very different types of character and genius facing off against each other in a game of chess.

    The first to be introduced is a wily Slavonian peasant who was discovered as an instant and natural chess genius when he completed a game left by a priest despite never having been taught anything. He is mostly focused on playing chess for money and, secondarily, glory and despite being defeating all of the world's champions cannot play blind chess--he needs to see the actual pieces.

    At first he is playing against a collections of passengers from the ship, when a mysterious man comes along who helps them fight to a draw. The mystery is deepened when the man states that he has not played chess for twenty years and even then was a mediocre player. Eventually his story comes out, but suffice it to say that it entails becoming increasingly focused on visualizing chess games without the help of a board or pieces--a deeply cerebral approach that is the opposite of the more crude and natural style of the Slavonian player.

    Eventually the two of them meet for a solo match and the book depicts a fascinating and respectful clash between these two titans.

    An underappreciated modern classic.
  • (4/5)
    I read this and Kawabata's The Master of Go back-to-back, and was very happy that I did. Both deal with the psychological effects of obsessing over complex boardgames, and explore a central character whose life has been consumed by such obsession. Despite the fact that Chess Story takes a fictional approach, while Kawabata's book is based on an actual person, there were many parallels between the two works, and each highlighted aspects of the other that otherwise I might have missed. While both books on their own are probably only worth three stars, the resonance created by reading them one after the other magnified my enjoyment so much that I'm giving both four stars.
  • (5/5)
    On board a cruise ship to Argentina, a world chess champion is challenged to a game of chess by a group of amateurs. Despite his lowly background and reknown ignorance for all matters besides chess, this chess champion is arrogant and dismissive of the group, and plays only for a hefty fee. However, on a rematch, a whispering voice in the background suddenly advises the challenger on moves that take the chess champion by surprise and the 2nd game is a draw. A challenge is issued by the world chess champion to this pale stranger to a game the following day.What unfolds before this game, is the stranger's story and in it, we are introduced to another form of torture during WWII - that of mental and emotional torture when one is placed in a void, bereft of any human contact, books or even a window to look out of for mental stimulation.This is a story of the strength of one man who manages to devise a strategy to survive this mental torture, but in his triumph against his torturers he falls victim to his own device.The final chess game provides the stage for one to show mental acuity and another, the scars that never heal.
  • (5/5)
    I would rather not go into too many details about the book because I would hate to ruin it for someone else. I will merely say that it is a meandering psychological story, reminiscent of Dostoevsky, that pits two brilliant foes against each other in a game of chess.Zweig uses the back stories of these two foes as a metaphor for his overall theme that the infinite can best be discovered by one who limits himself. This theme is also carried out through the chess board itself, which has just sixty-four squares and sixteen pieces, but has infinite permutations.
  • (5/5)
    A wonderful novella, a commentary on the Nazi occupation of Austria and a discussion on how there is no one way to achieve a goal, which of course is a commentary on Nazism itself, no? And chess, of course. The chess is well done, which it often isn't in novels. Great characters. .
  • (5/5)
    The entire action of this brief, taut novella takes place over the course of a few days a cruise ship from New York to Buenos Aires. Ultimately, it portrays the battle of two very different types of character and genius facing off against each other in a game of chess.The first to be introduced is a wily Slavonian peasant who was discovered as an instant and natural chess genius when he completed a game left by a priest despite never having been taught anything. He is mostly focused on playing chess for money and, secondarily, glory and despite being defeating all of the world's champions cannot play blind chess--he needs to see the actual pieces.At first he is playing against a collections of passengers from the ship, when a mysterious man comes along who helps them fight to a draw. The mystery is deepened when the man states that he has not played chess for twenty years and even then was a mediocre player. Eventually his story comes out, but suffice it to say that it entails becoming increasingly focused on visualizing chess games without the help of a board or pieces--a deeply cerebral approach that is the opposite of the more crude and natural style of the Slavonian player.Eventually the two of them meet for a solo match and the book depicts a fascinating and respectful clash between these two titans.An underappreciated modern classic.
  • (5/5)
    Powerful psychological novella about a man, Dr. B. and the nature of obsession or mania. The action takes place on board a ship heading for Buenos Aires. Dr. B. plays two games against a savant, a world chess champion, Mirko Czentovic. Dr. B. hasn't played chess for 20-25 years. Aires, Dr. B. tells his story to the unnamed narrator when the narrator has cornered him on deck. The tension was exquisite and this novella was a masterpiece of short fiction. I am no chess player [or a very bad one] but I feel anyone can enjoy this story.
  • (4/5)
    Die Geschichte war sehr unterhaltsam da ich auch schachfan (aber schrecklicher Spieler) bin. Je mehr man hört desto interessanter wird es.
  • (3/5)
    unterhaltsam aber recht Scherenschnitt-artig. Kann man sich anhören, muss man aber nicht