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Sommerhaus mit Swimmingpool (Gekürzte Fassung)

Sommerhaus mit Swimmingpool (Gekürzte Fassung)

Geschrieben von Herman Koch

Erzählt von Johannes Steck


Sommerhaus mit Swimmingpool (Gekürzte Fassung)

Geschrieben von Herman Koch

Erzählt von Johannes Steck

Bewertungen:
3/5 (18 Bewertungen)
Länge:
7 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Jan 21, 2013
ISBN:
9783839811115
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Dem Allgemeinarzt Marc Schlosser ist ein Kunstfehler unterlaufen, an dessen Folgen der berühmte Schauspieler Ralph Meier verstorben ist. Schlosser muss sich vor der Ärztekammer rechtfertigen. Es stellt sich heraus, dass er den Schauspieler gut kannte. Vielleicht zu gut. Mit scharfem Witz und genialer Beobachtungsgabe legt Herman Koch gesellschaftliche und familiäre Risse bloß: Ein hoch spannendes, meisterlich konstruiertes Familiendrama über Vergeltung und Gerechtigkeit.
Freigegeben:
Jan 21, 2013
ISBN:
9783839811115
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

Herman Koch was born in 1953. He is the author of a number of novels - including The Dinner, Dear Mr. M and Summer House with Swimming Pool - short stories, has acted for radio, television, and film, and was a co-creator of the long-running Dutch TV comedy series Jiskefet (1990-2005). The Dinner has sold over 2.5 million copies worldwide and spent a year on the New York Times bestseller list. Richard Gere, Steve Coogan, Laura Linney, and Chloë Sevigny also star in the film adaptation.



Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Sommerhaus mit Swimmingpool (Gekürzte Fassung) denken

3.1
18 Bewertungen / 57 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (2/5)
    The blurb of this book made it sound like it would be a psychological thriller. In reality, it was very slow-paced, which lessened the intensity of the story, rather than build suspense. Something dark and violent was supposed to happen at the summer home where two families had come together, but that incident was a minor, forgettable portion of the book, and was never really resolved. That being said, I did read the whole thing and though it was slow, I stayed interested in it. It just wasn't what I expected based on the summary.
  • (2/5)
    I was happy to receive a Digital Review Copy (DRC) of this title to review for Blogging for Books!

    Herman Koch's novel to prior to this one really wowed me. The essence of "The Dinner" crept up on me as I read, and by the end I was appalled and mesmerized. I looked forward to such a feeling when I began "Summer House with Swimming Pool," but I regret to say that feeling never arrived.

    Summer House is about a physician, Dr. Schlosser, with a less-than-altruistic sense of his medical vows. While his actions are describable, it is his thoughts that are truly vile and I was never able to develop the connection or fascination I would've needed to enjoy any part of this story. I do admire Koch's ability to shock and turn the story into something darker than you suspected it was.
  • (3/5)
    I'm really not sure if I liked this novel or not. Lots of the narrative was very engaging but then lots was very irritating. He seemed to wrap things up almost too casually. His reaction to the main event was most unlikely. Himself and his wife never told the police which was a very unusual decision. Later he almost blames Stanley for the incident and then continues the conversation (as does Stanley)as if he never mentioned the accusation. His views on life and women are a bit shocking at times for a contemporary novel. Obviously not suited to the career he has taken up as a doctor, he doesn't really like his patients. Some of those descriptions of the examinations are quite funny and dark.All in all I think I'm a bit disappointed. A bit sloppy. It was a good plot that could have been better written and a better, tighter conclusion.
  • (3/5)
    If you've read The Dinner by Herman Koch, you'll find Summer House With Swimming Pool to be similar--an unreliable narrator and basically unlikeable characters. This novel is narrated by Dr. Marc Schlosser, who takes a very jaundiced view of his patients, many of whom are rich and famous. One of his patients, Ralph Meier, has recently died, and questions arise as to whether Marc committed medical malpractice in connection with the death. Further, if there has been medical malpractice, is it possible that Ralph Meir was murdered? Koch has stated that the inspiration for this novel was the idea of a "passive murder." In addition, like The Dinner, the novel raises questions of how far a parent can, or should, go to protect their teenage children.I enjoyed this book, though not quite as much as The Dinner.3 stars
  • (4/5)
    If you haven't read the description of the book, don't. It gives too much of the plot away. I hate it when they do that.

    The main character and narrator, Dr. Marc Schlosser, has anti-social personality disorder. That's why so many of the reviews focus on his slimy personality, and why many readers couldn't get past it. So if you're wondering whether or not you want to read this book (why else would you be reading a review!), simply ask yourself whether you'd like to spend several hours in the company of a smart, manipulative, egocentric doctor who regards most of humanity with disgust. No? You wouldn't? Even if the story is excellent? That's fine, then. There are plenty of other books.

    If you said, "Well, that sounds intriguing," then this book for you. As in The Dinner, Koch pulls no punches. Good fiction tells the truth in an interesting way, and it is undeniably true there are folks like Schlosser on the planet. This particular bit of truth-telling about an anti-social doctor is tremendously good. I withheld the last star only because the plot didn't hold up in a few places for me.

    One more thought. The dear doctor is brutally honest about his distaste for some people, especially his patients, and makes many generalizations in the vein of "what this sort of woman wants" and "what men like him expect." Even as I cringed at Schlosser's observations, I couldn't help the uncomfortable feeling that the reason I was reading on so eagerly was because, as with most things that make us uncomfortable, there was a nugget of truth inside the muck. Just a thought.

  • (4/5)
    Very good book. Really enjoyed reading it. Kept my attention throughout. Would definitely recommend it!I received this book through the early reviewers program and couldn't have been more pleased. The book has a dark side and a fee twists along the way. Excellent reading!
  • (2/5)
    The writing is clear and the characters are usually interesting, but the pacing was a little too slow. Not much really happened when it comes down to it, and the "twist" (if it could be called that) at the end was unimpressive.
  • (5/5)
    He writes very strange and unusual books. He presents children in such a different light. His books are creepy without being scary. I am not sure "biology medicine" was translated correctly.
  • (2/5)
    I listened to the audio and never got beyond my first impression -- "I do not like or trust this fellow telling the story." Really not worth the listening experience. I did not like ANY of the characters---just a completely odd bunch. Yes, it made for a very different novel, unfortunately.
  • (3/5)
    A bit slow paced, and while the climax is pretty exciting I felt that there was a bit too much lead up and not enough action.
  • (3/5)
    5 for shock factor4 for storyline3 for feeling icky and dirty!Dr. Marc Schlosser is a General Practitioner who lives in Holland. Not only is he a bad doctor but he is also a real jerk and creep. He prides himself in giving his patients his undivided attention while at the same time despising and being repulsed by the human body. Marc, his wife and two young daughters spend vacation time at an actor's summer house with swimming pool. The stuff that happens there and a certain incident are sickening, unbelievable, tragic, and made me feel uncomfortable!If you are in any way squeamish this book may not be one to read! There are graphic descriptions of bodily functions, procedures, sexual acts, and even one of puncturing an infective eyeball! All the characters are unlikable and some are so disgusting that I literally felt sick! Having said the above I have to say that I could not put the book down! Does this make me a sick person or one who wants to experience the writings of authors who are new to me? Obviously Herman Koch wants to shock the reader and he certainly succeeded. This is a very dark and complex psychological story. Difficult to review and rate. 3.5?I won this book through LibraryThing.
  • (2/5)
    Although Koch is a great writer, I just don't enjoy his books. His characters are awful and so flawed that they become unlikable. I will give this book a second chance after a reread. I did more quickly through it due to it's late arrival. Long after promised and I had already given up hope.
  • (1/5)
    I almost never abandon a book but I frankly could not spend another moment in the company of Dr.Marc Schlosser, Ralph Meier, their inscrutable wives and uninteresting children. I did read half of the book, and found the narrator, Dr. Schlosser at best unreliable and creepy, at worst, repugnant. While I did enjoy discussing The Dinner with my book group, Koch's similar themes and characters will lead me away from ever reading any of his books again. Which is a shame, because he is clearly a talented writer.
  • (5/5)
    This book was totally engrossing (special emphasis on the GROSS). If I could write a tagline to this book, it would be: Gross people doing gross things. Which is, I've kind of come realize, one of Herman Koch's specialties. Of course, I'm joining the party just a bit late; everybody and their brother has read his provocative smash success, The Dinner. Upon reading this novel (whioh I was kindly given by LibraryThing's Early Reviewers - THANK YOU THANK YOU THANK YOU), I grabbed up a copy of his earlier novel. I finished it today. It was (surprise, surprise) more gross upper-middle class people doing more gross, morally reprehensible things. But, hey, Koch knows how to stir the pot, right? (By the way, I found The Dinner to be just a bit tighter, crisper, skillful than this follow up. At almost 400 pages, this book seemed to be product of a looser editorial hand - and it suffered because of it - but not enough for me to dismiss Summer House with Swimming Pool as a worthwhile read). It is American Psycho meets Lolita meets The Vacationers.Marc, our detestable, unreliable narrator, is filled with a long-simmering hatred for the human race. In particular, he has a special contempt for what he would surely refer to as the "weaker" sex. He is a a physician to the stars, husband and father; he is also one of the biggest assholes you'll ever met. Double standards are this man's bread and butter. He resents others for objectifying and victimizing his daughters and wife, yet he is a adulterer who nurtures violent fantasies about all those he meets. He simultaneously hates the wealthy clients who frequent his practice while longing to have access to the privileges their fame affords. Marc despises Ralph, a handsomely aging actor/buffoon, yet Marc wants to be around Ralph - Marc wants to be Ralph. But, when a summer vacation turns sour, Marc really just wants to kill Ralph. And, as his personal physician, Marc eventually gets the chance. This is the story of how things went terribly wrong between the two men - and how both of their families were made to suffer. A bit long-winded but a much-recommended read.
  • (4/5)
    I was fortunate to win a copy of Summer House with Swimming Pool: A Novel through the LibraryThing Early Reviewers Program. This book details a summer in the life of a middle aged general practitioner of questionable professional and personal ethics.Marc Schlosser runs a fairly successful medical practice in the Netherlands that has a large celebrity client base. At one point Marc may have liked his job, the reader is never quite certain, but he is definitely just in it for the money now. When one of his patients extends an invitation to visit them at their summer home at Marc's wife doesn't want to go but Marc manipulates the situation so that he gets the desired outcome. While visiting a tragic event takes place that will shape the lives of all those who are involved. Herman Koch points out his characters human frailties and shortcomings. The characters in this book are totally reprehensible and there isn't a likeable one among the bunch but they are well thought out and well written. Although, at some points I thought the book dragged a bit overall I liked this visceral and acerbic book. If you like dark contemporary fiction I would recommend this book.
  • (5/5)
    Vile and degenerate men i loved to hate. Cynical and witty, great rants.
  • (4/5)
    Marc is a GP with a thriving practice, a husband and a father to two adolescent girls. He's also a big jerk, but if you read Herman Koch's previous novel, The Dinner, this will come as no surprise to you. He hates his patients' bodies and petty concerns. Most of his patients are artists of some sort or another and he hates to attend the various openings and viewings they invite him to. Arrogant and contemptuous in his inner life, he nonetheless manages to put forth a genial and easy going face to the world and his patients like him. Then he meets Ralph Meier, a well known stage actor who takes a liking to him (and especially to Marc's wife) and invites Marc and his family to join them at the Summer House With Swimming Pool they've rented for the season. Marc has his own, less than admirable reasons to want to be there and so he engineers things so that his wife's misgivings are overridden. And then things begin to go seriously wrong for everyone present. Less extreme than The Dinner, this new novel still features a few reprehensible individuals. Koch manages to make Marc, despite his own horribleness, into the one the reader is pulling for.
  • (3/5)
    Koch does not write happy likeable characters. I can say that I did like his last book even though I couldn't stand the characters. Summer House With Swimming Pool is no different. Having said that I couldn't make it through this book. Perhaps it's just me and where I am right now.
  • (2/5)
    This book is horrifying. The hateful narrator is Marc, a Dutch GP, who lets us know right from the start that he views his patients with contempt and their bodies with disgust. How he manages to stay married and even loved by his wife -- and adored by his two daughters -- is a mystery. In the beginning his self-satisfaction and arrogance are almost laughable, but very soon things turn ugly. Koch is a talented author. And he has an intriguing idea here in this story of revenge. But it was difficult to read and left me feeling soiled.
  • (4/5)
    I had previously read and loved The Dinner. This author writes books where outwardly respectable people have diseased underbellies. This novel is no exception. In this case we have a psychopathic, possible adulterer doctor and he isn't the only one hiding secrets. The doctor and his family, an American photographer and his paramour, and a Dutch actor and his family all converge on a summer home with swimming pool and then the fireworks start. I love the horror aspect of Koch's novels. It's just so fun to see how these people unravel. Now if someone could just explain to me that last page to me concerning Stanley and his picture of donkey at the farm. What was that about? The ending was murky but in any case if something bad happened to any of the characters it was well deserved.
  • (4/5)
    If you don't mind reading about people with questionable-at-best moral compasses, you may enjoy Herman Koch's books. This one concerns Marc, who as the first line tells us, is a doctor. He's a general practitioner, so he listens to people's day-to-day troubles and reassures them that they are going to be all right. He doesn't really like looking at people's bodies, but he carries out his duty in the Dutch medical hierarchy as he sees it: he is the gatekeeper who prevents patients from swarming to specialists and toppling the entire healthcare system. Marc's patients tend to be in the arts - this isn't surprising since he has a reputation for listening sympathetically and also for being liberal with prescriptions. One of his patients is the actor Ralph Meier, and this relationship is the one around which all of the conflict in the book revolves. Ralph likes Marc, and Marc finds himself drawn into Ralph's life against his better judgment. The summer house of the title belongs to Ralph, and Marc and his family spend some time there on vacation. Events there spiral out of control in a variety of directions. Since the story is told in a sort of start-at-the-end way, the first things you read about are given more context as you come back around in time to when they happen. Whether or not that context makes Marc's actions more reasonable is really up to you. Koch likes to bring up big issues in a big way - it's not enough to have his characters muse about ethical matters in the hopes that readers will think about them too. The characters have to go out and cross lines, and Koch doesn't seem inclined to take any stand himself to show how he feels about them. His characters say things that may inspire the reader to judge them, but they're presented without additional commentary. I found myself jotting down thoughts about some of the topics raised by the book. A few I listed were: healthcare; human bodies perceived as merely organisms,; how men appear to those close to them, how they appear to strangers, and how the latter influence the former; where the threshold is for the transition from girlhood to womanhood, and what really triggers it. Recommended for: people interested in social dynamics, the not-too-sensitive.Quote: I could put it differently. You're a much bigger lush than Pablo Picasso ever was, I could say. The only thing is, you don't possess a tenth of his talent. When you look at things clearly, it's simply a waste. A waste of alcohol, that is.
  • (4/5)
    I like Herman Koch's writing style. I enjoy how his books go right to the heart of controversial topics and actions involving characters who are completely believable. The Dutch writer became famous with "The Dinner".This one's narrator is a doctor who despises most of his patients and most of their bodies. He's an arrogant bastard with a lovely wife and daughters. When he starts treating an aging actor, and when both men start lusting after each other's wives, you know nothing good's going to come of it. Especially when the families decide to share a summer vacation.But it's not all bad. The rest of his family stays pretty immune to his foibles. Though there is big trouble in paradise for sure.My only critique is that one minor story thread gets dropped, like in a soap opera when someone goes upstairs for a nap and then is written off the show.This is a very good summer read. I hope the writer stays in his groove and I look forward to his next book, and will maybe even check out his backlist if I ever have time.
  • (2/5)
    I'm not sure how to write a review for a book I'm not sure how I feel about. It was sort of like a train wreck. You couldn't stop reading.You kept reading hoping it would get better.The characters seem jaded and superficial and unlikable but I think that was the point.The story is told by an unknown narrator who tells how Dr. Marc Schlosser doesn't pay attention to or provides care to his patient. The patients thinks he is giving them his undivided attention and top notch care. Marc is portrayed as liking the attention of his B listed celebrity patients especially Ralph Meir.It is Marc need to seek attention from Ralph that puts his family in harms way.Marc's need to vacation at a summer house with a pool that sets up the catalyst for the darkest part of the book.Sometimes the story is confusing and the end leaves you unsatisfied and unresolved.I cant say I enjoyed this boo
  • (4/5)
    Herman Koch reveals himself as the Netherlands' answer to Ruth Rendell/Barbara Vine with this psychological thriller. Dr. Marc Schlosser, his wife and their two daughters join a sleazy Dutch actor and his various hangers-on for a luxurious vacation at the actor's summer home. Illicit sexual activity ensues. When something bad happens, Dr. Marc decides not to involve the authorities, but instead takes matters into his own hands. The ending is ambiguous, but it is safe to say that justice is not served.Dr. Marc is a complicated, unlikable narrator, a general practitioner who built his reputation on his sympathetic manner, yet he admits to the reader that his solicitude is only a pretense. His patients' bodies disgust him. He is simultaneously boastful regarding his medical knowledge and secretly ashamed that in the hierarchy of his profession, he is stuck on the lowest rung.As in a soap opera, the plot hinges on characters keeping secrets from each other that they would be better off sharing. Like its narrator, this book is complicated and not exactly likable, but it did keep me reading.
  • (5/5)
    Koch is a master at creating unlikeable characters, however, this novel held my attention far better than The Dinner. The story begins and ends in the same place. I was of one mind about the doctor's behavior in the beginning, and had a completely different view of him at the end. I enjoyed this book!
  • (5/5)
    A very interesting and thought provoking book revolving around a doctor and his relationships with his daughters, his wife and one of his patient's wives. This patient is a famous actor that he feels is lusting after his wife so he becomes jealous and protective. He is also very protective of his young daughters. However, this attitude does not stop him from trying to put "the make" and the actor's wife. It is a very interesting look into the sexual and psychological attitudes of men and women. The plot takes off after his fourteen year old daughter is raped and the doctor goes in pursuit of the culprit I loved this book.
  • (5/5)
    Marc Schlosser is a Dr. He treats celebritys. He says he gives them a generous twenty minutes of his time. But really he isn't listening to them. Ralph Meier is a celebrity he came to see Marc because he needs pills and had heard Marc prescribes things without much fuss. Much later he comes to see Marc about a lump on his thigh. Now months later Ralph isdead and Marc has to appear before the board of medical examiners who will decide whether it was mismanagement or something deliberate. Between the time of first meeting the actor and his death which Judith Ralphs wife is holding him accountable for something happened. The two couples and their children had spent a lovely summer holiday on the mediterranean at Ralphs summer house. How could the couples spending time together lead to an error that cost Ralph his life? Was it deliberate?
  • (3/5)
    This book reminded me of Koch's previous book "The Dinner." Just about all the characters were unlikable, and the book was steeped in feelings of dread. Because, as the reader, you just know something awful is going to be revealed, and you want to know what it is, but at the same time you don't want to know what it is.Dr. Marc Schlosser, the narrator of the book, is a general practitioner in the Netherlands with no ethics or sense of duty to his patients. He doesn't care about his patients and doesn't even listen to them when they come in for their appointments. He dispenses drugs willy-nilly and doesn't even feel guilty about it. It's a wonder he hasn't lost his license.The book begins by giving the reader a glimpse of what has just happened. One of Marc's patients - a famous actor named Ralph Meier - has died while under Marc's care, and the Medical Board is investigating the death. From that point the book rewinds to slowly bring the reader into the story to explain what has led to this point.There is a twist when the cause of Ralph's death is finally revealed, but by then I hated Marc and Ralph and Ralph's wife Judith and their friends Stanley and Emmanuelle so much that I was hoping they'd all suffer. Just like in "The Dinner," when I hated all the characters so much I didn't care what happened to them in the end.And maybe that's what kept me from liking the book all that much. It was hard for me to separate hating the characters from hating the book. And, boy, did I hate the characters. Koch is certainly a consistent writer in that he really knows how to create hugely flawed main characters who do awful things, don't feel guilty about it, and expect the reader to sympathize with them.
  • (4/5)
    Have you ever peeled an onion, taking off each of the leaves or whatever they are called, one at a time? That is sort of what this book is like. Everything is slow and deliberate, but there is another layer to peel, and another one after that. Nothing seems to happen, until everything is there and done. I'm not sure how I feel about the book, except I don't care much for the people. What happened to them, and what they did before and after, was rather horrifically bland.I received this book for free from Blogging for Books for this review."
  • (4/5)
    So glad to have heard about this book on one of the book podcasts I listen to. I first read The Dinner by this author and was very impressed. Now to turn to this book. I think I was expecting something like the Dinner, but it was different. I really enjoyed this narrator (even if he wasn't a particularly good person). Very impressed and I would recommend this book and this author!