Finden Sie Ihren nächsten hörbuch Favoriten

Werden Sie noch heute Mitglied und hören Sie 30 Tage lang kostenlos
Tödliche Wut (Gekürzte Fassung)

Tödliche Wut (Gekürzte Fassung)

Geschrieben von Linda Castillo

Erzählt von Tanja Geke


Tödliche Wut (Gekürzte Fassung)

Geschrieben von Linda Castillo

Erzählt von Tanja Geke

Bewertungen:
4/5 (6 Bewertungen)
Länge:
7 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Jul 25, 2013
ISBN:
9783839812211
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Sadie Miller wird vermisst, ein aufmüpfiger Amisch-Teenager aus Painters Mill. Ihre Familie ist verzweifelt, verbittet sich aber jede Einmischung von außen. Als Kate Burkholder, die Spezialistin für Amisch-Delikte, gerufen wird, ahnt sie Schlimmes. Denn das Szenario ist nicht neu, mehrere Mädchen der Glaubensgemeinschaft sind in der Vergangenheit spurlos verschwunden. Hat die Gemeinde etwas zu verbergen? Stecken perverse Amisch-Hasser hinter allem? Oder gibt es eine viel harmlosere Erklärung? Scheinbar nicht, denn schließlich findet sich Sadies Tasche - in einer riesigen Blutlache.
Freigegeben:
Jul 25, 2013
ISBN:
9783839812211
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

Linda Castillo is the author of the New York Times and USA Today bestselling Kate Burkholder series, set in the world of the Amish. The first book, Sworn to Silence, was adapted into a Lifetime original movie titled An Amish Murder starring Neve Campbell as Kate Burkholder. Castillo is the recipient of numerous industry awards including a nomination by the International Thriller Writers for Best Hardcover, the Mystery Writers of America’s Sue Grafton Memorial Award, and an appearance on the Boston Globe’s shortlist for best crime novel. In addition to writing, Castillo’s other passion is horses. She lives in Texas with her husband and is currently at work on her next book.


Ähnlich wie Tödliche Wut (Gekürzte Fassung)


Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Tödliche Wut (Gekürzte Fassung) denken

3.8
6 Bewertungen / 30 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    Another good entry in this series. The climax to the story was especially well done in this book.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent!
  • (4/5)
    Amish teens keep going missing and it isn't just in Painter's Mills. Kate gets called out of town to try and assist with a teen that has gone missing in another County. She gets to work with her favorite State agent once again Tomasetti, however while she is gone, one of her own goes missing. Kate immediately returns in a panic and it doesn't look good for this teen. Another great addition to this series, with all the twists and turns in here I really didn't know who the kidnapper was. The saga continues with Kate and Tomasetti.
  • (5/5)
    When young (14-17) girls who are experiencing "rumspringa" start disappearing from their homes the Ohio BCI turns to Police Chief Kate Burkholder. Kate was born Amish and is one of the 20% or so who never go back to the Plain lifestyle. Her advantage is she speaks Pennsylvania Dutch and can relate to the parents of the girls, set them more at ease because so many have a strong distrust of the Englisher police.

    Then tragedy strikes near to home when one of the missing girls is Kate's relative (her sister-in-law's family).

    Kate, working with Tomesetti, is racing against time. Are the girls dead? Who is the monster who is taking them, and why.

    This one is a page turner (well, to be fair all of the Kate Burkholder books are page turners).

    With enough twists and turns to keep you on your toes I really enjoyed this story. I had a bit of an inkling about who might be doing this, but the why, and how is really breathtaking.
  • (4/5)
    Castillo has a smooth way of writing; very believable descriptions and people and places. And she certainly creates suspenseful situations. Major objection is the use of key bad language which, in my opinion, eliminates the book from the teen market ... as well as objectionable to me and my family and the majority of our friends. Why authors feel they need to do this is strange. "But that's the way people talk," is their argument. They may be, but that doesn't excuse the writer who is certainly capable of working around that type of language. The book would have been much better, in my opinion, if she would have avoided this tempting trap.
  • (5/5)
    I always love a Kate Burkholder story from the first one I read by Linda Castillo. This one was no different. A well-portrayed glimpse into Amish life and their desire to be separate from the English. Unfortunately, they find themselves drawn in by police investigating murders in their community.
  • (3/5)
    Listening to this series and I complement the reader. The reader can make or break the book when you listen on cd. The mystery is good -keeps you on your toes--although sometimes it is predictable--but I love the stage for the series. I lived in OHIO and recognize and have been to many of the places she refers to. I used to see the Amish all the time. I think Linda is a good Mid-Western small town girl. The writing reflects that. Thank you Linda!
  • (4/5)
    Now a well-worn grove, Kate Burkholder is drawn into a mystery that involves Amish folk and John Tomasetti helps, only this time the situation is reversed. Kate consults on a case of missing teens, teens who are dissatisfied with the Amish way of life. Kate's knowledge of how things work in this world is invaluable and John knows it. He also knows that he wants to spend more time with her and to develop the relationship but they're both hesitant.I enjoyed the read, I found the ending quite shocking and interesting and wonder what's going to happen next.
  • (3/5)
    As usual, Castillo delivers a fast moving, unpredictable mystery. Just wish they'd been some better editing. Number killed and revelations weren't consistent throughout the book -example, the news account was incorrect in # and skipped the fate of the deputy.
  • (5/5)
    Kate Burkholder, police chief at Painter Mill, has been called in to consult on a missing persons case because the family is Amish. With her Amish background Kate is the perfect person to help communicate with the family. She is also working with friend and lover, John Tomisetti. It soon becomes obvious that there are multiple missing Amish girls and that the cases could be related. When a girl from Painter's Mill is reported missing, Kate is even more determined to solve the case.I love this series. Every book gives me more insight into Kate and her complex background. I like the information about the Amish culture as well. The growing romance story interests me too. They are two lost souls who have found each other. I want to see them succeed in their relationship. Since the bulk of the story takes place away from Painter's Mill, I did miss some of the regular characters but I am sure they will be back in the next book. Now I have to wait for another year.
  • (4/5)
    Gone Missing is a very entertaining and enjoyable book. That said, it does have a few problems. There were times while reading it that I seriously considered giving it a 3-star rating and once even a 2-star. However after I finished reading the book, particularly the last chapter, I felt Linda Castillo redeemed herself and I ended up liking the book quite a bit.For me, the book starts off on a bad note. I almost tossed it in the trash pile. The prologue involves a 15-year old Amish girl recounting how her 18-year old brother had been abusing her since she was 3 years old. I find that form of sensationalizing fiction by means of sexual descriptions of minors to be reprehensible. I found it interesting that Castillo's main character, Chief of Police Kate Burkholder, spent a lot of page time emoting about the evils of abusing minors.In any case, I'm glad I continued reading because the book became very interesting. The descriptions of the Amish, while at times a mite repetitive, were also compelling. Castillo's background of growing up in Western Ohio helped, no doubt, since this is where the Kate Burkholder novels are set. Her descriptions of the people and lifestyle come across as very authentic.There seem to be a few holes in the plot that really bothered me but they were neatly filled in near the end of the book. In a neat fashion that left me quite impressed. Personally I'd prefer Castillo to skip the sex with minors aspect to these books but other than that this is top shelf writing. You can see Castillo's roots in romance writing when it comes to the relationship between her central characters. Their dancing with commitment issues is very real to life and refreshing to see.
  • (4/5)
    Great fourth boo kto the series. It will be a long year waiting for the next book!
  • (4/5)
    First Line: Becca had always known her life would end in tragedy.From its heartbreaking beginning to its chill-inducing ending, this book is all about "kids, our most precious resource, and the way we treat them." Once Amish herself, Painters Mill, Ohio, Police Chief Kate Burkholder is a perfect choice to act as a consultant with the Bureau of Criminal Investigation as they look into the disappearances of two young Amish girls. Not only will she be able to work with John Tomasetti again, but the case will hopefully put her out of range of the town mayor. (He wants Kate to turn a blind eye to the extremely illegal things for which his son was arrested.)As Kate and Tomasetti start looking into the lives of the missing teenagers, they begin to discover links to cold cases that go back several years. Bodies also begin to turn up, and the investigation becomes a race against time to save those young girls who are still missing.Amish areas are small and insular, so I wondered how author Linda Castillo was going to prevent "Cabot Cove Syndrome" (the constant appearance of dead bodies in a rather sparsely populated area). Solution: Loan Kate Burkholder out as a consultant in other areas of the state when investigators need an "Amish expert." In Gone Missing, this has her working with Agent John Tomasetti-- the spice in her gumbo-- which keeps the romantic tension flowing.A very likable character, Kate is well-respected in the law enforcement community, but she's also very conflicted about many things in her past and present. Since she's no longer Amish, she has a strained relationship with her family, as well as a tendency to empathize with any rebellious Amish youth.The beginning chapter, which deals with the heartbreaking suicide of a young Amish girl sets the book up perfectly. The girl says just enough to let us know that there's one Amish homestead that isn't picture postcard perfect. In fact, in that one short chapter, Becca makes such an impression that I kept waiting for the tie-in with these present day disappearances. When that tie-in comes, it's much more than I was expecting-- leading up to a spine-chilling conclusion.I'd only previously read the first book in the series, but not having the information from books two and three did not prove confusing. Castillo gave me just enough information to fill in the blanks, and to whet my appetite for the two books I have yet to read.For some reason, the Amish hold a fascination for many of us. I grew up very close to an Amish area and visited often with my grandparents when they'd go to the butcher shop, cheese shop, and a grocery store that sold homemade pies, breads, and jams. Castillo's Amish ring true, and even though you may find yourself wondering if things like this really do happen in Amish settlements, she's such a storyteller that belief is willingly suspended as the pages of the book turn. If you've never read a Kate Burkholder mystery, I highly recommend them!
  • (5/5)
    This is one of the best mystery/suspense series with a female lead around. It's fresh, the characters are beleivable, well drawn and fleshed and likable, the series teaches about a different culture without being preachy and each new book in the series leaves me breathless. Ms. Castillo is an amazing author to have created something so finely written and something that you can rely on to keep you not only entertained, but something that will engage your brain. This is no light fluff reading. This is cold hard murder set within a group of people that the rest of the world looks at as if they may be beyond this sort of thing. Of course we all know better. Even the most naive of people are capable of the most heinous of murders and Ms Castillo puts it out there.With Rumpspinga a young adult/teen is trying to find a way in their life. They are trying to see how the other half (the Englishers)live, what with our electricity, cars, drinking, naughty behavior between the sexes etc.And someone has taken it into their own two hands to teach these kids a lesson.As Kate and her sort of boyfriend John, try to help out at another crime scene - things start escalating with someone close to Kate coming up missing. This book, nor any of the others are really for the faint of heart. Descriptive passages and vivid detail can bring you to your knees. But occasionally you can see the tender sides of both Kate and John emerge and that somehow makes it all worth while. This is not a 'romance' book, but there is romance in the air and that makes for a wonderful side story. Something to take the tension down a notch occasionally.Clever plotting will leave you almost wondering just how the heck it ended like it did---be sure to read to the very last page. Ms Castillo is sure to surprise you, like she did me.
  • (4/5)
    Castillo provides another shocking mystery involving the clash between Amish and American culture. A quick read.
  • (3/5)
    This is a good series if you enjoy mystery and suspense. A quick read with a good story. In order to really understand the characters and their relationships, you do need to read the other books in the series.
  • (2/5)
    A little too much language for me.

    I liked the story behind this book the amish adult who left and became police chief.
    But I think the story could of been told with less language. The story would of been just as good to me. I will never understand why people beleive that adding vulgar language makes a better story.

    I have decided not to read the third book at this time.
  • (4/5)
    This is another great book in the Amish thriller series. Although this is book 4, I have only read 2 in this series. However, there was no problem in following the story line of the main character, Kate Burkholder. Raised Amish, she has since left that community and is now Chief of Police in a small rural town.These books are very well written, with lots of suspense and twists and turns. Kate is also in a relationship with John Tomasetti, an agent with the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation. In this story, Tomasetti and Burkholder wind up working together when several rebellious Amish teen girls wind up missing without a trace. Kate is brought onto the case hoping that with her Amish upbringing, the Amish community will be more willing to open up and talk to Kate.There are certainly some dark and disturbing things happening once again in these normally hardworking Amish communities. Kate discovers she will need all her wits to find these girls before it is too late and the ending was definitely action packed! Be prepared to read book number 5, it looks like the ending may leave us wanting more.I recommend this story to anyone who enjoys thrillers.
  • (5/5)
    This is another great book by Linda Castillo. I've read each of her books. The Kate Burkholder series keeps the reader on the edge of the chair throughout. These stories detail the challenges of the Amish getting along in the world where things are not as they believe they should be--things that go againist all of their beliefs. If you like a good mystery with lots of twists and turns, then this book is for you.
  • (4/5)
    Another in the Kate Burkholder series revolving around her detective abilities, in this story, Amish teens are missing. Some bodies are found, others simply disappear. Castillo does an excellent job of portraying the Amish culture. Because they are a closed group who tend to take care of things themselves, they are reluctant to come forth and ask police to help.Previously an Amish person, Burkholder knows the culture and is able to communicate with them to her advantage.With very few clues and a lack of a motive, frustration mounts as more teens become missing.This is good writing with great character development, and a snapshot of a culture who holds fast to their beliefs and has a very difficult time when their children rebel.Recommended, with the caveat that these books have a large dose of vivid descriptions of violence.
  • (4/5)
    This book is the 4th in a series. I really like the stories and how the author can tell it with such detail and suspense. It did feel a little like same ol' same ol' but I enjoyed it.In this installment, teenagers from the Amish community keep turning up missing, one after another in a 100 mile radius. Kate is asked by Tomasetti to work on this case of his because of her understanding of the Amish. She becomes attached to the investigation in a way that she never expected and she's forced to keep a level head so she doesn't screw it up.I must say that at one point, I was at the edge of my seat while reading. I felt like I was running with Kate. And I just love how I'm probably the only one who didn't see the obvious... I was kind of caught off guard at a small revelation at the end of book.Yes, it's a recommend!
  • (4/5)
    Linda Castillo's latest release - Gone Missing - is the fourth book in her popular Kate Burkholder series. Kate is the Chief of Police in Painters Mill, Ohio, home to a large Amish population. Kate herself was raised Amish but has chosen to leave and lives as an "Englischer". Her background makes her invaluable in dealing with the Amish community. State Agent John Tomasetti asks Kate to consult on a case he's working - a missing teenage Amish girl. As they delve deeper into the case, it appears there are more missing Amish teenagers. But have they met with foul play? Or are they experiencing Rumspringa - a time when young Amish can 'sow their wild oats' with no repercussions before deciding if they will commit to the community. Castillo combines many elements, making her books easy, interesting and engaging reads. First off, Kate is a very likeable character. She is respected by her staff, respects the Amish and comes across as a 'real' person. She is conflicted about many things in her personal life, most notably her burgeoning relationship with Agent Tomasetti. This definitely adds some 'spice' to the novel. The case is a good whodunit. I do wonder if these crimes (because some of them are quite ugly) do happen in the Amish community? Is Castillo basing her plots on facts or creative license? The pacing is quite quick, with lots of action - especially at the end. (which was a good gotcha as well) Those looking for a hard bitten crime novel won't find it here. But those looking for a easy, engaging summer read will enjoy Gone Missing. Fans of Julie Garwood and Tess Gerritsen would enjoy this character. The first book in the series, Sworn to Silence, will soon be a two-hour original movie starring Neve Campbell as Kate Burkholder.
  • (5/5)
    SummaryThree Amish girls are missing in Ohio - all within a 50 mile radius. Chief Kate Burkholder gets called in as a consult with Agent John Tomasetti to try and find the killer. Through a maze of twists and turns, Kate and Tomasetti work together to try and stop this violent, dark killer from taking advantage of young Amish women. Their relationship grows as they begin to think of a future together including the parts of themselves that drive each other crazy. Can they keep the lines drawn between personal and professional and/or do those lines even really exist for this pair. They are who they are and what they do. Together. What I LikedOne of the scariest non-horror movies I've ever seen was Kiss the Girls based on the book by James Patterson with Morgan Freeman and Ashley Judd in the lead roles. The final chase scene in Gone Missing reminded me of a particular part of this movie...I can't tell you which part though bc it is definitely a spoiler. Suffice it to say my heart was pounding wildly, I couldn't stand it...had to read, read, read as fast as I could...felt like I was in Kate's shoes, etc. If you're a fan of this genre, that's something that doesn't happen very often...I could actually see what Kate was seeing, hear her breathing and the breathing of the person who is after her. And, all this from a BOOK! Sadie - she reminds Kate of herself when she was younger for so many reasons and then for so many more reasons once the novel comes to a close...**I hate not being able to say more, but I won't spoil it for you**The Setting - thank-you so much Linda Castillo for not making this book set in Painter's Mill. If the folks of Painter's Mill had to deal with one more serial killer, I think they'd all evacuate! I like that Tommasetti's job as a state agent is turning out to be a natural segue through which Kate will be called upon as a consultant to help with Amish issues.John Tomasetti - I sooooo still like this man. And, I do not usually go all goo goo over characters. But, this one is something else...a man who loved his family, is angry at the world over losing them, loves Kate, accepts her for who she is, tries to protect her but accepts the fact that in their line of work, he won't always be able to, loves his job, is good at his job, falls down sometimes and has a hard time getting up...but still gets up...wants to move forward with the relationship but is scared to death at the same time, and honest.John Tomasetti stands on the porch with his hands in his pockets, looking out over the backyard as if his being here in the middle of the night is the most natural thing in the world.I turn the bolt lock and swing open the door. "Don't tell me," I begin. "You were in the neighborhood."He turns to me, hands still in pockets, his face deadpan, and for a split second I'm terrified he's come here with some dire news about the case. "Actually, I drove a hundred miles, against my better judgement and without telling my superiors, to sleep with you."What else do you need to know??Why are you not reading these books right now???What I Didn't LikeThe only really bothersome thing about this series for me is the level of violence in or involving the Amish communities. We just don't hear about it as much as other hate crimes, domestic issues, etc. What Castillo does very well is illustrate that crimes involving the Amish may very well go unreported due to their belief that God will take care of everything and that they shouldn't involve outsiders into Amish affairs. I couldn't help but wonder if there is any existing data on crimes involving the Amish. I would definitely think young Amish people during their years of Rumspriga would be easy targets for criminals and pedophiles...again, I'd like to see the statistics, if any exist.Overall RecommendationIf you've read the other 3 books in this series, you must continue. If you haven't, then what are you waiting on? If you like fast paced mystery thrillers with a tough female protagonist, what are you waiting on??
  • (4/5)
    Anyone who has been around for a while knows that I am a fan of Linda Castillo’s Kate Burkholder series (I wrote a glowing review of Breaking Silence late in 2011). For those of you who are new, Linda Castillo writes one novel a year, released around May/June. Her protagonist is Chief of Police Kate Burkholder–Kate was raised in the Amish community of Painter’s Mill and chose to leave the “plain life” when she was a teenager. Her departure from the plain life damaged her reputation within the Amish community, but her understanding of their way of life made her an excellent choice for Chief. Unfortunately, despite their desire to remain isolated, trouble and tragedy plague the Amish community and Gone Missing takes us back into the dark underbelly of the community once more.

    Amish teenagers are going missing across Ohio and the only thing they have in common is their desire to leave the plain life. Around the age of 16, Amish teenagers enter a period called rumspringa. While the definition of this period of time differs slightly across communities, it is essentially a period of time when Amish youth can experience things outside their normal lifestyle, such as wearing non-traditional clothing, driving motorised vehicles and drinking alcohol . It’s a rite of passage of adolescence where misbehaviour is overlooked to a certain degree and teenagers ultimately choose whether to be baptised into the church or leave the community. Most Amish teenagers opt for baptism, but that doesn’t rule out some serious mayhem and debauchery during rumspringa.

    A Linda Castillo novel would not be complete without Agent John Tomasetti and once the connection is made the disappearing teenagers are Amish, John calls Kate in as a consultant in the hope that her Amish roots will help bridge the gap between the communities and shed some light on the investigation. For the uninitiated, Tomasetti is Kate’s perpetual love interest/achilles’ heel. They developed a more-than-professional relationship in Castillo’s first instalment, Sworn to Silence, and have been navigating the murky waters of colleagues-come-lovers ever since. The case breaks wide open when a young girl, seventeen-year-old Annie King, is reported missing and a pool of blood is located close to where King was last spotted. Up until then, there was no definitive proof that harm had befallen the missing teenagers. With time running out, Kate and Tomasetti go back through the case, with the perennial “there’s something we are missing” train of thought plaguing both agents. When the pieces fall into place, Kate finds herself in a deadly game of cat and mouse with arguably one of the most twisted and shocking killers I’ve come across in a while.

    Castillo has demonstrated once again why she is a crime writer with a long and bright future ahead. Although I didn’t find Gone Missing as captivating as some of the previous instalments, I guarantee the ending will chill you to the bone. I dare you to not skip ahead and find out what happens–the last 50-odd pages practically turn themselves.
  • (4/5)
    Gone Missing
    4 Stars

    A series of disappearances of Amish teenagers leads state agent John Tomasetti to request the expertise of Painter’s Mill Chief of Police Kate Burkholder. As the two investigate, it becomes clear that dark secrets exist in any community as does the willingness to kill.

    The investigation into the missing teens is absorbing with numerous twists and turns as well as several promising red herrings. Nevertheless, there are insufficient clues to figure out who is responsible and too many unresolved loose ends. Moreover, the idea of rebellious Amish teenagers is somewhat far fetched and having so many in such a small area feels forced.

    As with the previous installments, it is the characterization that grabs the reader. From the young Amish girl in the prologue with her heartbreaking story of betrayal to the elderly couple grieving for the loss of their child to Kate and Tomasetti whose relationship is one of the best aspects of the books.

    Speaking of them, Kate is finally coming to realize the extent of her feelings for John, but questions whether he is as emotionally involved as she is or whether he is still mourning his wife. The fact that the perspective is limited to Kate’s and we are not privy to John’s thoughts (unlike in the previous books) only reinforces the tension in this regard.

    In sum, although the mystery is one of the weaker in the series, Castillo’s insight into Amish culture and her skillful way of making each and every character come to life makes this a worthy addition to the series.
  • (5/5)
    Book Description Linda Castillo’s bestselling series has been called “gripping” [People] and “impossible to put down” [Bookpage] and the “teeth chattering suspense” [USA Today] continues with GONE MISSING—a deeply chilling novel about a rite of passage gone horribly wrong. Rumspringa is the time when Amish teens are allowed to experience life without the rules. It’s an exciting time of personal discovery and growth before committing to the church. But when a young teen disappears without a trace, the carefree fun comes to an abrupt and sinister end, and fear spreads through the community like a contagion. A missing child is a nightmare to all parents, and never more so than in the Amish community, where family ties run deep. When the search for the presumed runaway turns up a dead body, the case quickly becomes a murder investigation. And chief of Police Kate Burkholder knows that in order to solve this case she will have to call upon everything she has to give not only as a cop, but as a woman whose own Amish roots run deep. Kate and state agent, John Tomasetti, delve into the lives of the missing teen and discover links to cold cases that may go back years. But will Kate piece together all the parts of this sinister puzzle in time to save the missing teen and the Amish community from a devastating fate? Or will she find herself locked in a fight to the death with a merciless killer?

    My Review This book was a very intense and riveting story - another winner from Linda Castillo. Her excellent writing and complex plots keeps the reader on edge until the last page. Kate grows from book to book and it's best to read the books in order and watch her growth.
  • (4/5)
    Kate Burkholder is the Chief of Police of the fictional town of Painters Mill, located in the very real Holmes County, Ohio. She was raised Amish but left the community as a young adult. After some twists and turns, she is now back among the people and family with whom she was raised, though not a part of them. Her relationship provides an interesting subtext that ties all of the books together.

    John Tomasetti, also involved in law enforcement as a State Agent, has become more than a friend since he and Kate worked together on a murder case a little over a year ago. Having both experienced tragedy and facing it often in their careers, Kate and John make a good team, both on and off the job. It still surprises Kate when John requests that she join the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI) in Cleveland as a consultant on his latest case where a young Amish girl has gone missing following Rumspringa. She has hardly begun her investigation before she learns that this disappearance is the third and latest to occur over the course of a year. The possibility that the girls had decided to leave the Amish world for that of the English, with its freedoms and temptations, has to be entertained. Yet it's unlikely that any of the girls, let alone all of them, would leave their community and family so abruptly.

    Gone Missing is an excellent police detective story containing suspense that’s gritty and unexpected. This novel isn’t for the faint of heart, where some of the realism will make your skin crawl. Linda Castillo very aptly leads the reader down the path of shock and surprise. This is my favorite of the four books I've read in this series and it left me wanting more. This is a series I will definitely keep reading. I've listened to all of them, narrated by Kathleen McInerney, who I think does a wonderful job.
  • (5/5)
    Tension is high in this thriller about missing Amish children. Chief of Police Kate Burkholder is asked to help with the investigation since she used to be Amish. The team, including her friend John Tomasetti, hopes that the Amish will open up to her and provide the police with some much needed leads. It becomes personal to Kate, when her sister’s niece disappears. With cold cases and new ones, time is of the essence. Not all will be saved, but with expectations to crack the case before it is too late for all keeps the team on high alert. Problems arise with false leads and with deciding who is telling the truth and who is hiding behind lies. With well-developed characters and an intricate plot, you won’t put this book down until it’s over.
  • (5/5)
    Chief Kate Burkholder is back! Castillo weaves another story centered on the Amish with taste and believability, which crackles with tension, suspense, and a bit of flourishing love.Amish teenage girls are missing and Kate is called in to work with her lover and colleague John Tomasetti, an agent with the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCI). She’s asked to be a consultant with the BCI because she knows about the Amish…lived as one herself before bending too many rules. Now she has to work every hour of every day with Tomasetti without letting their new relationship get in the way.Someone is kidnapping and killing the young girls. Why? Who? Those are just a few of the questions Kate wants to answer. Castillo stymies the reader with possible suspects and potential reasons.The revelation of the perpetrators will astound you as Kate finds out who is knee-deep in the serial kidnappings and murders. This thriller will have you racing to the finish to not only find out who is committing such atrocious crimes but also to read about Kate and Tomsetti’s adoration of one another and where it will lead.Five out of five stars!Reviewed by Starr Gardinier Reina, author of “One Major Mistake”
  • (4/5)
    Kate Burkholder, 33, has been the Chief of Police in small Painters Mill, Ohio for three years. She spends a lot of time corralling cows and teenagers, because the Amish in this community pretty much police their own. The one exception is the time of “Rumspringa,” when Amish adolescents are allowed to sow some wild oats before they choose either to become baptized in the Amish church or to leave the community. As it happens, Kate is one of those young people who left, after a traumatic incident that occurred when she was fourteen.Kate’s Amish background comes in handy; she is fluent in Pennsylvania Dutch, and her knowledge of “the plain life” helps her bridge the gap between “Englishers” and Amish when issues arise for which the police must be summoned. Thus, when some Amish teens have gone missing from nearby towns, Kate is called upon for consultation by John Tomasetti, an agent with the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification in Cleveland. She and Tomasetti met a year and a half earlier, and they became something more than just colleagues and friends. But they each have relationship fears, as well as dark places inside that they each keep shuttered up. As a result, there is both an attraction and a tension between them when they are together.The discovery of additional missing Amish teens is coupled with the need to find out what they might have in common; who might be targeting them; and the need for haste, since no one knows whether these young people are dead or alive. The increasing danger brings Kate and Tomasetti closer once again, and builds up to a pretty hair-raising ending.Evaluation: Although this is the fourth book in the Kate Burkholder police procedural series, it is the first that I have read. Nevertheless, I had no problems; Castillo did a fine job of seamlessly supplying antecedent circumstances. I enjoyed all the background on the Amish community and I really liked the complexity of the relationship between Kate and Tomasetti. The thrilling finish seemed more realistic to me than most such scenes, even if the premise behind it felt a bit over the top (or at least, I hope it is over the top!)