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Thirty-Eight Witnesses: The Kitty Genovese Case

Thirty-Eight Witnesses: The Kitty Genovese Case

Geschrieben von A.M. Rosenthal

Erzählt von Jeff Cummings


Thirty-Eight Witnesses: The Kitty Genovese Case

Geschrieben von A.M. Rosenthal

Erzählt von Jeff Cummings

Bewertungen:
3.5/5 (4 Bewertungen)
Länge:
2 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 13, 2017
ISBN:
9781543606720
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

On March 13, 1964, Kitty Genovese was brutally beaten and murdered in the street near her apartment, in full view of more than three dozen friends and neighbors-and no one did a thing to stop it. More than thirty-five years after its first publication, Thirty-Eight Witnesses , the true account of what transpired that night in Queens, New York, continues to disturb us. We would like to think that we would step in and do what we could to stop the carnage. But not much has changed in the ensuing years, as crime goes on all around us and we do nothing to help.

Pulitzer Prize-winning New York Times reporter A. M. Rosenthal covered the case for the paper as its city editor, and his chronicle of the events became this book. Part memoir, part investigative journalism, part sociological study, a disturbing story of urban apathy, Thirty-Eight Witnesses puts readers on the gritty sidewalk of the murder scene and speaks of the need for change. In the ensuing years, the case has become famous, and today in criminology classes, students learn about witnesses and the Genovese Effect. A new foreword discusses the historical legacy of the case and how little has changed in fifty-plus years.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 13, 2017
ISBN:
9781543606720
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

A. M. Rosenthal (1922–2006) was a Pulitzer Prize–winning foreign correspondent and the longest-serving executive editor of the New York Times, holding the position from 1969 to 1987. He joined the Times as a staff reporter in 1944 and ten years later was assigned to the paper’s New Delhi bureau. As a foreign correspondent, Rosenthal reported from India, Poland, and Japan, among other locales, and was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1960. In 1963 he returned to New York and quickly rose through the editorial ranks at the Times, overseeing coverage of the Vietnam War, Watergate, and the Iran-Contra scandal. He played a decisive role in the publication of the Pentagon Papers and, for his exceptional support of human rights, received the United States’ highest civilian honor, the Medal of Freedom, from President George W. Bush in 2002. Thirty-Eight Witnesses (1964), Rosenthal’s groundbreaking account of the murder of Kitty Genovese and ensuing public outcry, is a classic of twentieth-century journalism.


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3.3
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  • (4/5)
    I received this book from the publisher in exchange for a review. This did not effect my opinions of the book, or the review itself.I distinctly remember being shocked and horrified by this case when I first learned about in my Social Psychology class in college. As I began to read more and more true crime, I sought out books on Kitty Genovese (two of which have recently been published, only one of which I have so far read).This is the original book on the subject, reissued for a new generation of readers hungry to understand just what happened. Rosenthal was a newspaper editor who not only sent his reporters out on the case, but was the first to break the story of the thirty-eight witnesses and their famous "apathy". Though the book originally came out over 40 years ago, it still feels relevant today. Rosenthal forces his readers to examine the hard-hitting questions no one truly likes to think about: What would I myself have done if I was one of those thirty-eight? Would I have acted any differently? Do I act any differently in my everyday life?Am I just the same as those thirty-eight infamous witnesses?
  • (4/5)
    This account of the murder of a young woman in New York back in 1964 is very thought provoking. No less than 38 people witnessed - either visually or aurally - the murder, and yet not one of them summoned the police or any other form of help. Much has be written since this case as to why people would behave like this, what it says about our society, what it says about human beings. This book is a re-print of an piece written at the time by a Pulitzer prize winning journalist. Since reading it I have found myself pondering about the issues he raises.
  • (2/5)
    This case has always intrigued me, it’s about a young woman, Kitty Genovese who was murdered in 1964. She was coming home after closing a bar that she managed to her safe, neighborhood in Queens. She is being followed by a man who randomly follows women home who are driving alone at night to kill them. While she’s parking her car she notices the man is approaching her so she tries to get to a police call box to call for help. He's on her before she can get there and stabs her in the stomach, she cries out for help, several times. The lights are being turned on in the building of her home and several windows were opened and some people are shouting out for the man to leave her alone, they are more irritated by being woken up at 3:00 AM than hearing a woman fight for her life.The assailant runs from the scene after the first attack which gives Kitty time to try to make it to the door of her home. He's come back to finish what he started while she's still screaming out for help. He finally stabs her in the throat to stop her from screaming. All the while thirty-eight people are watching. Anyone of them could have picked up their phone and dialed "0" to get help if they didn't want to physically get involved. It didn't seem to take much to scare the man off since they had already done it once. One man calls the police but it was too late, he calls from a neighbor's phone after he calls his friend for advice. It's unbelievable.This is a short book that was written from a famous newspaper editor’s point of view, he is so torn as to why no one bothered to call the police sooner and what stopped them. He sends a reporter out there to interview some of the witnesses and also get the feel of the neighborhood. The excuses he gets are just awful, it's like they didn't care. They didn't want to get involved that's the bottom line. Some would have the nerve to blame the police, from past bad experiences that they had when talking to them.It’s was interesting to read how archaic police communications were back then. This crime did prompt a change in police communications in New York city. Even though if they would have been called while the first attack was waking was taking place, Kitty's life would have been saved. I was disappointed in the fact that the book didn't focus more on the crime and the investigation itself. It was a bit dry in places when the author would make comparisons regarding what he saw while he was a foreign correspondent in third world countries and what happened that night in Queens, it's was almost like he was wrestling with his own conscience. This book was mainly from a journalistic point of view. I felt I reading a personal journal of the author's account of his feelings regarding this incident. I would like to thank Open Road Media and NetGalley for providing me a copy of this e-galley to read and give my honest opinion.