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Amina's Voice

Amina's Voice

Geschrieben von Hena Khan

Erzählt von Soneela Nankani


Amina's Voice

Geschrieben von Hena Khan

Erzählt von Soneela Nankani

Bewertungen:
4/5 (183 Bewertungen)
Länge:
4 Stunden
Freigegeben:
2. Juni 2017
ISBN:
9781501972423
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

"Amina's anxieties are entirely relatable, but it's her sweet-hearted nature that makes her such a winning protagonist." -Entertainment Weekly

A Pakistani-American Muslim girl struggles to stay true to her family's vibrant culture while simultaneously blending in at school after tragedy strikes her community in this sweet and moving middle grade novel from the award-winning author of It's Ramadan, Curious George and Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns.

Amina has never been comfortable in the spotlight. She is happy just hanging out with her best friend, Soojin. Except now that she's in middle school everything feels different. Soojin is suddenly hanging out with Emily, one of the "cool" girls in the class, and even talking about changing her name to something more "American." Does Amina need to start changing too? Or hiding who she is to fit in?

While Amina grapples with these questions, she is devastated when her local mosque is vandalized. Amina's Voice brings to life the joys and challenges of a young Pakistani American and highlights the many ways in which one girl's voice can help bring a diverse community together to love and support each other.

Freigegeben:
2. Juni 2017
ISBN:
9781501972423
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als ebook verfügbareBook

Über den Autor

Hena Khan is a Pakistani American writer. She is the author of the middle grade novels Amina’s Voice, Amina’s Song, More to the Story, and the Zara’s Rules series and picture books Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns, Under My Hijab, and It’s Ramadan, Curious George, among others. Hena lives in her hometown of Rockville, Maryland, with her family. You can learn more about Hena and her books by visiting her website at HenaKhan.com or connecting with her @HenaKhanBooks.


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Was die anderen über Amina's Voice denken

4.1
183 Bewertungen / 17 Rezensionen
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Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    This book Absolutely Recommended! 
    About A heartfelt story of family, friendship, faith and finding your voice.
  • (4/5)
    Really inspirational! I love Amina's story and the relationships among friends, family and community.
  • (4/5)
    Oh boy! Middle school is tough. I mean you remember it as being tough but with some distance you convince yourself that you were silly to take it all so seriously. Amina's dilemmas brought back all my middle school angst with friend groups changing and feeling so self-conscious all the time. Add-on that Amina is a Muslim daughter of first generation immigrants from Pakistan and you begin to understand the difficulties this girl of 12 is facing. Beautiful but I did not find it as relaxing as I had hoped. These are some serious issues told so that middle graders can understand.
  • (3/5)
    I liked the books message but I feel like I didn’t have enough time to connect with the characters .
  • (5/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    Please read this book. It has such a great storyline and it’s really good.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (4/5)
    School story -- Amina and her best friend Soojin have been through a lot together, so when Emily (a previous tormenter) begins to make friends with Soojin, Amina is untrusting. She's also trying to reconcile her desire to sing in public with her massive stagefright, and to figure out how to interact with a visiting uncle, who has different values, Pakistani values, that do not always mesh with Amina's family. There's also an upcoming competition to read the Koran that she's expected to participate in, and their beloved mosque comes under attack. There's a lot going on in this book, but it's incredibly well done, and reads true to the life of a contemporary sixth grader. Amina and her friends have a lot of challenges, but her family is there for her, her community comes through, and she finds friendship and hopefulness in places she never expected. Feel good, well paced, authentic.
  • (5/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    This was the best book I’ve ever read.????? Plz try it

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (5/5)
    *(w-s28”can.sc.kmxl@#dj 98 f .2# 3D @d3d cafe. 2 d dc@d
  • (4/5)
    I loved this book dearly And it was page turner. But I feel that it was a very short book and could if been longer especially when the vandalism happened. Great book a little scary. All and all, amazing read.
  • (5/5)

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

    This is an amazing middle grade read that I'm sure can change a young reader's perception, self-love, and social awareness.

    1 Person fand dies hilfreich

  • (5/5)

    4 Leute fanden das hilfreich

    this was so great. what a sense of community, and such a pure, wholehearted middle grade novel. definitely recommended

    4 Leute fanden das hilfreich

  • (5/5)
    Good story about a Pakistani American during her first year of middle school. Amina was best friends with Soo-Jin who was to become a citizen this year. There are the concerns of jealousy,acceptance and trying to meet her parents approval. But there are lessons from the Quran, from her visting Uncle from Pakistan, some Urdu and the value of music. Also, the sense of community not only from the mosque members but from the schools she attended and the outside faith community.I received this Advance Reading Copy from the publishers as a win from the FirstReads contest. My thoughts and feelings in this review are entirely my own..
  • (4/5)
    Amina has a beautiful voice, but she has a hard time using it in public. Things seem to be changing in middle school, and she is worried her best friend Soo-jin is changing. Emily, a girl who had made fun of them in their past, suddenly wants to be friends. Amina is suspicious and jealous. A lot of middle school problems of friendship and fitting in couple with interesting cultural issues about Amina's performance in Sunday School, her ability to speak Arabic, and her uncle's visit from Pakistan. A touching quick read.
  • (3/5)
    Good story about family, friends, and faith, but a little too many story lines.
  • (5/5)
    Amina has a really hard time fitting in with other kids at school while at the same time expressing her culture like her parents want her to. Amina does not like attention and is perfectly okay with just hanging out with her friend Soojin. She gets very upset when her mosque is vandalized, but her voice in the community bring joy to other young Pakistani Americans.I would read this book to 2nd through 5th grade and use this book to teach my students to not change themselves to fit in with a group and to always express themselves. I would also teach them to always embrace their culture and always be accepting to other people’s cultures.
  • (3/5)
    "Amina's Voice" was an okay story for younger readers and gave a good insight into what it is like growing up in a Muslim family. However, I did find Amina fairly self-centred, especially when she thought her best friend was becoming friends with another girl, and there were parts where the plot was flat. There were some good themes raised in "Amina's Voice" but they were only touched upon. A quick, easy read, but not a compelling one.
  • (4/5)
    Amina's life is full of questions: why is Emily, a former mean girl, trying to break into Amina's friend group? Can Amina find the courage to sing in her school concert despite debilitating stage fright? Will Amina's visiting Pakistani uncle disapprove of her family's American lifestyle? Will Amina's parents make her participate in the upcoming Quran recitation contest despite the aforementioned stage fright? All of this is eclipsed when the mosque Amina's family attends is horrifically vandalized. In the wake of the attack, Amina must finally find her voice.Young readers of all backgrounds will see themselves in Amina's school and family struggles. The book does a good job of showing some elements of Muslim religious practice without seeming didactic or taking readers out of the story. I would have appreciated a glossary of some of the terms used, but most could be inferred from context. This is a lovely book that I definitely recommend.