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My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Eliza Schuyler Hamilton

My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Eliza Schuyler Hamilton

Geschrieben von Stephanie Dray und Laura Kamoie

Erzählt von Cassandra Campbell


My Dear Hamilton: A Novel of Eliza Schuyler Hamilton

Geschrieben von Stephanie Dray und Laura Kamoie

Erzählt von Cassandra Campbell

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (30 Bewertungen)
Länge:
23 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Apr 3, 2018
ISBN:
9780062842343
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

From the New York Times bestselling authors of America's First Daughter comes the epic story of Eliza Schuyler Hamilton—a revolutionary woman who, like her new nation, struggled to define herself in the wake of war, betrayal, and tragedy. Haunting, moving, and beautifully written, Dray and Kamoie used thousands of letters and original sources to tell Eliza's story as it's never been told before—not just as the wronged wife at the center of a political sex scandal—but also as a founding mother who shaped an American legacy in her own right.

A general's daughter…

Coming of age on the perilous frontier of revolutionary New York, Elizabeth Schuyler champions the fight for independence. And when she meets Alexander Hamilton, Washington's penniless but passionate aide-de-camp, she's captivated by the young officer's charisma and brilliance. They fall in love, despite Hamilton's bastard birth and the uncertainties of war.

A founding father's wife...

But the union they create—in their marriage and the new nation—is far from perfect. From glittering inaugural balls to bloody street riots, the Hamiltons are at the center of it all—including the political treachery of America's first sex scandal, which forces Eliza to struggle through heartbreak and betrayal to find forgiveness.

The last surviving light of the Revolution…

When a duel destroys Eliza's hard-won peace, the grieving widow fights her husband's enemies to preserve Alexander's legacy. But long-buried secrets threaten everything Eliza believes about her marriage and her own legacy. Questioning her tireless devotion to the man and country that have broken her heart, she's left with one last battle—to understand the flawed man she married and imperfect union he could never have created without her…

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Apr 3, 2018
ISBN:
9780062842343
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch


Über den Autor

Stephanie Dray is a New York Times, Wall Street Journal & USA Today bestselling author of historical women’s fiction. Her award-winning work has been translated into eight languages and tops lists for the most anticipated reads of the year. Before she became a novelist, she was a lawyer and a teacher. Now she lives near the nation’s capital with her husband, cats, and history books.


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4.5
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  • (5/5)
    I felt dropped right down into that time and place. Such vivid portrayals and sense of place. In the author's notes, mention is made of where any liberties were taken (mostly timing), and the correspondence from whence came much of the dialog. I won this book via Early Reviewers, but never received it, so finally listened to it on audio. I loved this book! But really wish I had the paper copy to reread the author's notes again. Highly recommended!
  • (5/5)
    This is the second historical novel by the writing team of Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie. The first was about Thomas Jefferson's daughter and this is about Alexander Hamilton's wife, Eliza Schuyler Hamilton. The authors saw the play Hamilton: An American Musical when it first came to Broadway. While they were astonished by what they call "an incredible work of historical fiction", they also became curious about Hamilton's wife Eliza and wanted to know more about her than they learned from the play and from the book it was based on (Ron Chernow's Alexander Hamilton). It didn't take them long to decide this woman's accomplishments should also be told. Eliza's story is far too tumultuous and long, almost one hundred years, for me to say much here. It's well known that she is responsible for saving much of Hamilton's correspondence, essays and other writing, dogging both his friends and enemies, even taking them to court, to obtain documents that were important to the establishment of an American government. She was also an advocate for poor women and children, something women of her social class wouldn't normally do, and after her husband's death worked as the manager of an orphanage. Although this is a novel, the writers share their research with readers. It is their custom to make visits to sites connected to the subject and I enjoy reading about their experiences and impressions of those places that still remain. They also make the list of all of their sources available online, something that few writers of historical fiction do.At about 650 pages, the authors are through and professional. The book is very readable though and gives us a better understanding of what Revolutionary women committed to being and doing. I think I should note that Stephanie Dray is a former teacher and lawyer and Laura Kamoie has a doctorate in history and is a former assistant professor at the U.S. Navel Academy. They both live near Washington, D.C.
  • (5/5)
    Whoa. I seldom think books 5 stars, holding that rank for those that go so far and above my expectations. THIS was far and above my expectations. Having so recently had the honour of seeing "Hamilton" on stage, I thought it perfect that this book come along and feed the curiosity that the musical sparked. Coming away (stunned and shell shocked) from the show, I was curious about Eliza's views and feelings. I identified with Eliza - as I imagine most women can/do. She haunted me and I wanted to know so much more about her. "My Dear Hamilton" pulled back that curtain and gave us all of Eliza. I was absolutely consumed. What in the beginning felt like a large book (appx 650 pages) read quicker than a short story. I have never had a lot of interest in historical fiction--but this was just simply incredible. I'm glad that the story of Eliza and her Hamilton has found its way out. I laughed, I teared up, and at times was stunned by some of the events - but enjoyed it all.
  • (4/5)
    Finished just in time for my book discussion tonight! It was interesting to see this important time period in American history through Eliza's eyes. I thought I had a good grasp of the facts from this era but I still learned quite a bit. I can't wait to see what tonight's group thinks of it. I am also doing it for a discussion for another group in two weeks. It is always fun to see how the two groups look at the same book in different ways.
  • (5/5)
    Eliza Schuyler Hamilton was the woman behind Alexander Hamilton, one of the founders of America. Always strong in her own right, Eliza grew up the daughter of a general and helping in the field hospitals. Eliza often accompanied her father while he met with the Haudenosaunee tribes and other influential leaders of the time such as Washington, Monroe, Madison, Burr, Lafayette, Arnold and of course, Hamilton. Eliza and Alexander quickly become captivated with one another. As Alexander's role within the newly formed government grows, Eliza learns just what it means to be the wife of a Congressman and a founding father. She also learns how to use her influence and skills to help Alexander and create the country he dreamt of.I dove into this story of Eliza Schuyler Hamilton with reckless abandon. At over 600 pages, I knew I would be lost in Eliza's story of scandal and triumph. From the prologue, when we meet Eliza as an older woman and a widow and she states "Silence is often the only weapon available to ladies. And I wield mine expertly," I knew that this was going to be a strong character that I could easily identify with. Eliza's story begins when she is a young adult, the daughter of a general on trial for treason. Right from here, I could see her determination shine through; she was on a mission to prove that a daughter or wife could make a difference. Through Eliza's eyes and experiences, I could see the Revolutionary War and America's early days in a new light. I had known of Hamilton's major accomplishments; however, with Eliza's view I now know just how much work he put into founding our country as well as Eliza's influence and guiding hands. Through Eliza's narrative, I learned of the roles of the Native American Tribes, the bravery and tenacity of the African-American troops and the overall devastation that the war caused for so many. With the excellent partnership of Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie's writing skills, Eliza Hamilton and the Founding Fathers come to life. Complete with extraordinary and intricate historical detail, I could imagine every argument, meeting and setting with ease. Overall, I learned the lengths that Hamilton went to make sure his legacy for the foundations of the United States was set. Complete with love, loss, scandal and war, My Dear Hamilton is one of my favorite reads this year.This book was received for free in return for an honest review.
  • (4/5)
    I've noticed a number of novels about Alexander Hamilton's wife Eliza recently - a side effect of the Broadway show perhaps? I've now read a few of them and I think this one is the best so far. The authors dig into Eliza's life and make a point to include Eliza's life before she met Hamilton and after his early death. This makes for a very long book, but also provides a good sense of Eliza as a person and how her marriage to a Founding Father impacted the course of her life. A good overall read and certainly something that would interest Hamilton fans.
  • (3/5)
    Richly satisfying fictional biography of Betsy Schuyler, wife of Alexander Hamilton, from her girlhood to wifehood in which she is his helpmeet, to her widowhood in which she comes to terms with certain personal events that have touched them both.
  • (3/5)
    This was a very interesting account of early American history, and the authors did a great job bringing the events to life. Also, I loved their notes explaining where and why creative license was taken.I didn't rate this book higher because for the first part of the book Alexander was so petulant and vengeful that I didn't believe Eliza could love him. I felt she was confusing physical attraction and love of his ideals with love for the man. Later their relationship changed so that I could believe Eliza was in love with her husband.These next couple points seem picky, but I mention them because they pulled me out of the story:Some of Eliza's speech seemed modern. For example, regardless of how she felt about slavery, given the time period, isn't more likely that she would have described Sally Hemings as Jefferson's mulatto slave rather than Jefferson's "enslaved mulatto"?And was Eliza really pregnant for a year? One chapter starts with a heading telling us it is September 1791. On the next page Eliza tells us, "When the winter's snow came...I was again with child." By the next page it is December 1792 and Alexander describes Eliza as "too far gone with child". On December 12, 1792, Eliza has a newborn. A silly mistake that resulted in a brief but unfortunate distraction.I do look forward to reading the authors' next book. I would love for them to write about Abigail Adams or Dolly Madison.
  • (5/5)
    My Dear Hamilton is my favorite book that I have read this year. Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie give us a history lesson about Alexander Hamilton through the eyes of his wife, Eliza. Their storytelling brings history to life. This book is beyond fabulous. A must read!
  • (4/5)
    I was really anticipating this book. I had enjoyed America’s First Daughter, the book these same authors wrote about Patsy Jefferson (who makes an appearance in this novel.) It is certainly delightful learning about the country’s Founding Fathers through the eyes of the women closest to them. This book tells Alexander Hamilton’s story but it is very much Eliza’s book.It is delightfully hefty book that allows the reader to sit down and truly get immersed in the subjects of the tale. The problem faced by the authors as they explained in the note at the end is that there was very little left in the historical record specifically about Eliza. It’s as if the men in her life sucked up all that would be remembered and left only crumbs for her. Given the times in which she came of age and the company she kept I suppose it could be understood. When your father is fighting to found your country and your husband is molding it – what is left for you? It also wasn’t exactly a time that revered the efforts of women was it? The authors had to rely upon those crumbs and then do what fiction writers do – imagine.Imagine they did using their extensive research and knowledge of the era. But while this is Eliza’s story, Hamilton does overwhelm her as soon as he appears in the pages. From the moment they are introduced it is all about him. I can’t say that I liked him. I also can’t say that I have much to compare this characterization t0 so I don’t know if it is accurate to his personality or not. He did suck the air out of any room he was in and even after he was dead it was Hamilton, Hamilton, Hamilton.Eliza was apparently a very devoted wife.It was a very good read, as annoyed as I got at Mr. Hamilton. I also wonder how this country survived it’s first few decades. I really need to do more reading of American history. The story of Eliza, so dedicated to her husband and to her country is a fascinating look at the woman behind the man who did so much for a country that did not always respect him or his ideas. It is very much worth reading.
  • (4/5)
    Having read First Daughter last year this book felt almost like a continuation, Eliza at times sounded like Patsy. It took a bit to get the tie between the two out of my head. Yes they're very different but the voice sounded too similar I thought. I found out how little I really knew about Alexander Hamilton. Also interesting the differences in politics between Jefferson and Hamilton. Also how fragile the country was then. Today history made me feel like the US won the revolutionary war and then was a united country, but this book helped me see it was nothing of the sort. It was a tremendous struggle and at so many points it was nearly lost. Then there is the story of Betsy/Eliza and all the tragedies she endured due to men with ideals they were willing to die for, from her father (General Schuyler) to her son and husband.
  • (5/5)
    This book is a captivating account of the life, dreams and struggles of Eliza Schuyler Hamilton, the woman who with love and adoration, eagerly accepted Alexander Hamilton's proposal of marriage and stood by him throughout his difficult and often challenging short-lived life. The story begins in the throes of the American Revolution and proceeds through the establishment of the nation's infrastructure, near failure and tenuous foot hold within the world. It presents Eliza as a spirited yet respectful woman - one of great strength of character, fortitude and courage. She, as a young daughter of war General Philip Schuyler, occasionally accompanied him on formal visits with native tribal leaders and had been welcomed into the tribe. She was fearless and tremendously helpful in ministering to the wounded troops gathered near the General's home along the Hudson River.Succumbing to the attentions paid her by young Colonel Alexander Hamilton, aide to Commander in Chief George Washington, her life along the bucolic Hudson River suddenly picked up its pace and never slowed until her final days. She was Hamilton's committed partner, lover, bride and bearer of many children and always subject to public scrutiny, given the fame of her husband. She was the epitome of those words of 1 Coninthians 13:7, "Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things." Co-authors Stephanie Dray and Laura Kamoie within the book's accompanying notes clearly state that the historic record is a bit skimpy as to the details of Eliza's life. Through their extensive research by study of the rich historical records of other noteworthy individuals of the day and research visits to historical places, they have painted a vivid tableau of this strong female character of the American Revolution and the nation's formative days. The writing is rich, painterly and impeccably done. One is transported in place and time and dropped right into the thick of things. I eagerly look forward to reading more works by these two authors.I am grateful to publisher William Morrow and Goodreads First Reads for having provided a free advance reader's edition of this book. Their generosity, however, did not influence this review - the words of which are mine alone. ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++Synopsis (from book's back cover):A general’s daughter…Coming of age on the perilous frontier of revolutionary New York, Elizabeth Schuyler champions the fight for independence. And when she meets Alexander Hamilton, Washington’s penniless but passionate aide-de-camp, she’s captivated by the young officer’s charisma and brilliance. They fall in love, despite Hamilton’s bastard birth and the uncertainties of war.A founding father’s wife...But the union they create—in their marriage and the new nation—is far from perfect. From glittering inaugural balls to bloody street riots, the Hamiltons are at the center of it all—including the political treachery of America’s first sex scandal, which forces Eliza to struggle through heartbreak and betrayal to find forgiveness.The last surviving light of the Revolution…When a duel destroys Eliza’s hard-won peace, the grieving widow fights her husband’s enemies to preserve Alexander’s legacy. But long-buried secrets threaten everything Eliza believes about her marriage and her own legacy. Questioning her tireless devotion to the man and country that have broken her heart, she’s left with one last battle—to understand the flawed man she married and the imperfect union he could never have created without her…
  • (5/5)
    "If Alexander had lived, he'd have never let that stand. He'd have challenged Monroe just as he challenged me, and everyone else, every day of his life. And I am a better person for it.I live in a better world because of Alexander Hamilton.And so do we all." (Eliza Hamilton in My Dear Hamilton)OMG, people, this book.As a history nerd and former junior high social studies teacher, I've always been a bit of an Alexander Hamilton fan, even when I didn't agree 100% with every single choice he made in his personal(! Dude! What were you thinking???) or professional life. I vaguely remembered reading some about his wife in one of Cokie Roberts' books (Ladies of Liberty: The Women Who Shaped Our Nation), but it was ages ago and I don't remember a whole lot.Seriously, how is it possible that no one has written an actual biography of Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton? I've had Chernow's book on my mental TBR's "when I've got a good chunk of time" shelf for some time--surely I'll manage it before seeing the musical next year, yes?--but of course Mr. Hamilton will be the focus of that work, not his wife. When I saw that Ms. Dray and Ms. Kamoie were writing a biographical historical fiction version of her life? I was beyond excited. I'd loved America's First Daughter, after all (even if I can never think of Thomas Jefferson in quite the same way again) and knew they'd do an equally amazing job telling Eliza's story.They did not disappoint! Though the story had me captivated from start to finish, the author notes at the end were equally engrossing. Separating fact from fiction and hearing their reasoning behind the choices they made when fictionalizing Eliza's life was absolutely fascinating. The Telling Her Story: How My Dear Hamilton Differs from Hamilton: An American Musical section was just as fascinating, and I completely blame these two authors if just hearing the words "I'm not throwing away my shot" makes me burst into tears from this point on. (I may also spend much of my time at the musical performance next year glaring at the actress who plays Angelica. Don't judge.)I really can't recommend this book enough. If you love American history (but perhaps wonder where the women are in the history books...?) read this. If you're an Alexander Hamilton fan--whether you already have/are going to/want to see/or have never heard of (if that's the case, where the heck have you been?) the musical version of his life, read this. If you love books about strong but flawed heroines, read this.Heck, just read this book. You won't be sorry. Since I now have an audio, print, and ebook copy, you'd better believe this book has now been shifted to my "I'm going to read this again, and again, and again..." shelf. I'll try to resist the urge to read it again right now somehow.To distract myself, a re-read of Ladies of Liberty: The Women Who Shaped Our Nation is most definitely in order...and maybe Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation too, while I'm at it...maybe it's even time to seriously consider picking up Chernow's book...?However, I'll probably never be a Thomas Jefferson fan again...just sayin'. This novel did not at all improve my opinion of him...Rating: 5 stars / A
  • (4/5)
    I was really anticipating this book. I had enjoyed America’s First Daughter, the book these same authors wrote about Patsy Jefferson (who makes an appearance in this novel.) It is certainly delightful learning about the country’s Founding Fathers through the eyes of the women closest to them. This book tells Alexander Hamilton’s story but it is very much Eliza’s book.It is delightfully hefty book that allows the reader to sit down and truly get immersed in the subjects of the tale. The problem faced by the authors as they explained in the note at the end is that there was very little left in the historical record specifically about Eliza. It’s as if the men in her life sucked up all that would be remembered and left only crumbs for her. Given the times in which she came of age and the company she kept I suppose it could be understood. When your father is fighting to found your country and your husband is molding it – what is left for you? It also wasn’t exactly a time that revered the efforts of women was it? The authors had to rely upon those crumbs and then do what fiction writers do – imagine.Imagine they did using their extensive research and knowledge of the era. But while this is Eliza’s story, Hamilton does overwhelm her as soon as he appears in the pages. From the moment they are introduced it is all about him. I can’t say that I liked him. I also can’t say that I have much to compare this characterization t0 so I don’t know if it is accurate to his personality or not. He did suck the air out of any room he was in and even after he was dead it was Hamilton, Hamilton, Hamilton.Eliza was apparently a very devoted wife.It was a very good read, as annoyed as I got at Mr. Hamilton. I also wonder how this country survived it’s first few decades. I really need to do more reading of American history. The story of Eliza, so dedicated to her husband and to her country is a fascinating look at the woman behind the man who did so much for a country that did not always respect him or his ideas. It is very much worth reading.
  • (5/5)
    I confess, I got interested in Alexander Hamilton, thanks to the Broadway play. I started reading Ron Chernow's book several months - which is good, but it's taking me a while to get through it. This was a much easier read - still long, but easier.I don't remember how I found out about this book, My Dear Hamilton, but finally bought a copy and loved it. Wow. As mentioned in other reviews, it's a fictional biography of Hamilton's wife. It starts before she meets Hamilton and ends years after his death. So much good stuff in this book...I wish I'd paid a little more attention in history class about this time period and about the early government. If you're a fan of history, early government times, and/or Hamilton, I strongly recommend this book. I finished reading it several days ago, but I can't let it go yet.