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Sharpes Sieg: Episode 2

Sharpes Sieg: Episode 2

Geschrieben von Bernard Cornwell

Erzählt von Torsten Michaelis


Sharpes Sieg: Episode 2

Geschrieben von Bernard Cornwell

Erzählt von Torsten Michaelis

Bewertungen:
3.5/5 (6 Bewertungen)
Länge:
10 Stunden
Freigegeben:
May 19, 2010
ISBN:
9783863461423
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Richard Sharpe ist bei der Belagerung von Ahmadnagar und der Schlacht von Assaye (Indien, 1803) mit dabei. Ein englischer Offizier ist zu den Marathen übergelaufen. Er und Sharpe treffen unter dramatischen Umständen aufeinander und Sharpe hat den Wunsch sich zu rächen. Er bekommt Sonderaufgaben und - mehr aus Zufall - wird vorübergehend Wessleys Ordonanz. Natürlich ist Hakeswill wieder hinter ihm her, eine begehrenswerte Französin spielt eine Rolle und Sharpe macht sich Freunde und Feinde auf beiden Seiten.
Freigegeben:
May 19, 2010
ISBN:
9783863461423
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

BERNARD CORNWELL is the author of the acclaimed New York Times bestselling Saxon Tales series, which includes The Last Kingdom, The Pale Horseman, Lords of the North, Sword Song, The Burning Land, Death of Kings, The Pagan Lord, and, most recently, The Empty Throne and Warriors of the Storm, and which serves as the basis for the hit television series The Last Kingdom. He lives with his wife on Cape Cod and in Charleston, South Carolina.


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3.7
6 Bewertungen / 17 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (3/5)
    Not the strongest edition of Cornwell's Sharpe series, this is nevertheless entertaining with diverse characters and a moving story. Definitely got the feeling that this was a filler between 'Tigers' and 'Fortress', but still necessary.
  • (4/5)
    Always enjoyable Sharpe!
  • (3/5)
    As a fan of the Sharpe films, I was eager to go back and read the true Sharpe taless from the beginning and the Adventure series seemed the perfect place to start. Sharpe's Tiger, by comparison, held the reader captive with it's quick clip and edge-of-the-seat action, Sharpe's Triumph is actually much slower paced and is rather dry like the East Indian plains it portrays. Although, if you have the wherewithal to plow through like a true infantryman, Bernard Cornwell paints a delicious picture of battle in the Middle East pre-dating the great Napoleonic War. Sharpe's Triumph is a book that illustrates the early careers of both Sir Major-General Arthur Wellesley and the even more important, Sergeant Richard Sharpe.
  • (3/5)
    Sergeant Richard Sharpe is a hero, in many ways, but also an ordinary soldier doing his job. War is brutal, and this comes out in the novel. In some ways he is like Flashman, drawn reluctantly into battle. He is cunning, but without the innate cowardice and caddishness of Flashy. One of a series, I shall certainly seek out more.
  • (5/5)
    By far the greater part of this book takes place during the Battle of Assaye in India. As with all of the 'Sharpe' series,the stories as a whole are strongly based upon historical fact. Bernard Cornwell is a master of interweaving his fictional characters (notably Richard Sharpe himself) and a large cast of individuals who actually existed. (notably Sir Arthur Wellesley)This important battle is described in great detail and in a most interesting and thrilling way.I am looking forward to reading the next in the series with some anticipation.
  • (4/5)
    Cornwell is a great descriptive writer. I have read three of the Sharpe series and all of them have been the kind of book that I can not put down. They capture the reader from the first page and each succeeding page delivers up more action and pulls me more into the story and the history.
  • (5/5)
    Hugely entertaining, and simply thrilling. The battle sequence was a page turner, I could not stop. I felt like I was in the battle!
  • (4/5)
    It's tough for me to imagine Richard Sharpe with clubbed hair since I can only see him as Sean Bean in his heydey. This is the second in the series of Richard Sharpe's adventures in India. Between the fighting and womanizing Cornwell finds time to shed historical enlightenment about this critical stage in the development of the British Empire. This is pre-Raj when the British East India Company still holds sway and the British military is finding its way among the myriad kingdoms of India. Sharpe, as usual, lives to fight another day despite massive odds, while seducing the ladies, riding elephants and despatching the bad guys along the way.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent read. It's a well written book. The reader did an great job - especially with the changing of the voices.
  • (3/5)
    Sharpe is a likeable character and Cornwell writes excellent battle scenes. Very entertaining.
  • (5/5)
    In 1803, 4 years after his debut in Sharpe's Tiger, Sgt. Richard Sharpe has carved out a more or less comfortable life for himself in Wellesley's army. As the book opens, he has just returned from being the sole survivor of a massacre led by a renegade British officer, Lt. Dodd. Colonel McCandless, the intrepid head of Intelligence for the British East India Company's forces, who befriended Sharpe and who was rescued by Sharpe from the Tippoo Sultan's dungeons during the Battle of Seringapatam in 1799, commandeers Sharpe to assist him in tracking Dodd and bringing him to British justice. As a result, Sharpe finds himself at the Battle of Assaye, where he meets both Wellesley and his evil Nemesis, Sgt. Obadiah Hakeswill, again in an exciting climax.This is another fast-paced action-adventure story by Cornwell. The history is sound, the writing is excellent, and the characters engaging. Another, somewhat pallid, love interest, but then you can't have everything! The climax of the book, the Battle of Assaye, is a real page-turner; I couldn't put it down until I'd finished.An outstanding read, highly entertaining as well as informative. Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    Sharpe's Triumph is the second, chronologically, of the Richard Sharpe novels by Bernard Cornwell. This is the second of the three books tracing Sharpe's experiences in India. Coming four years after Sharpe's promotion to sergeant following the successful siege of Seringapatam, we find Sharpe jerked away from his comfortable existence in that city, and accompanying Col. McCandless, an intelligence officer we met in the Tippoo Sultan's dungenons, to capture an East India Company turncoat serving with the Mahratta confederacy's army. The bloody story takes us through the Battle of Assaye, one of Arthur Wellesley's more sanguinary victories, fought with a lot of guts against a much larger foe. Two of the highlights of the book are our further encounters with that malevelant bottomfeeder, Obadiah Hakeswill. This time he's engineered a dishonest plot to arrest Sharpe on a trumped up charge so he can bump him off and take the jewels Sharpe looted from the Tippoo Sultan. This story also holds the incident in which Sharpe is promoted from the ranks for saving Wellesley's life. It is some intense, exciting action. Sharpe's Triumph is a good read, fun stuff, a great addition to your Sharpe library.
  • (3/5)
    Sharpe's Triumph, which is chronologically the second book in the Richard Sharpe series (though the 14th published), is a good, bare bones example of the virtues of Bernard Cornwell's writing in this series: while it doesn't contain as much information about the Indian states (or the literary crossover "in-joke") as its immediate predecessor, Sharpe's Tiger: Richard Sharpe and the Siege of Seringapatam, 1799, it does deftly and compellingly sketch out military battles on a large, medium, and one-on-one scale. Cornwell's description of the tactics is strong enough to make the poorest strategic game-player feel like an armchair Napoleon (or, better, an armchair Arthur Wellesley, the future Duke of Wellington, the preeminent "real-world" figure featured here -- who, after all, did put paid to Boney's dreams of empire), while his action scenes are vivid enough to make even the clumsiest and weakest reader wistfully yearn for a chance to prove himself on "the field of honor," even with all of the gore and grue. Sharpe's quest -- to find a traitorous East Indian Company officer, in the company of a Scots colonel of "John Company's" army -- is paralleled by the quest of his nemesis, Sergeant Obadiah Hakeswill, to (officially...) clap him in the chokey. If one is left wanting a bit more of the Mahratta (the spelling used here; also known as "Maratha") point of view of the Second Anglo-Marathta War (1803-05), that's really not the purview of the Sharpe novels; a balanced treatment of the Indian POV would've resulted in a novel easily twice the length of the one at hand (291 pps., including a 3-paged historical afterword), while not necessarily increasing the enjoyment to be had. The fact that Cornwell does not elide over what happens to the human body, in or out of uniform, when men wage war should serve as all the counterweight that a thinking reader needs to balance the skirl of bagpipes and the tattoo of drums.
  • (4/5)
    An excellent sequel to Sharpe's Tiger.
  • (4/5)
    Fascinating account of colonial warfare, hard to believe such an outnumbered force could achieve victory. The details are breathtaking.The first half of the book only merits three stars, but the second half is worth five, so we'll call it four stars for the whole thing.
  • (3/5)
    Sergeant Richard Sharpe is a hero, in many ways, but also an ordinary soldier doing his job. War is brutal, and this comes out in the novel. In some ways he is like Flashman, drawn reluctantly into battle. He is cunning, but without the innate cowardice and caddishness of Flashy. One of a series, I shall certainly seek out more.
  • (4/5)
    Okay, this series is definitely growing on me. ^_^ Even though this book is #2 in chronological order, I think it was written more recently than several of the other books… so either I’ve just gotten used to Cornwell’s style, or perhaps his style has improved a little over time.Gah! And I hate Sergeant Hakeswill! He keeps killing characters that I like! Argh. At least I know what eventually becomes of him, since I’ve watched almost all of the Sharpe movies. Cornwell’s female character wasn’t quite as pathetic as some of the others he’s written… but still, she was a bit flat. An improvement, though. I doubt Cornwell does it on purpose, for I catch a little feminist irony in there now and then. Perhaps he’s just uncomfortable with writing women. I can understand that. I once learned while watching a Stephen King biography that he used to fear writing women too until he got positive feedback from some. *shrugs* There is a character in the Sharpe movies that I like, who ends up being very important in Sharpe’s life at one point. Not the mousey little British girl that takes him for all he’s worth, but the strong Teresa. (I think that’s her name.) I’ve very eager to get to the book that has her in it, because I’m curious to see how she’s written.Until then, though, I continue onward with the series. Damn, but they’re addictive!