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Sharpes Festung: Episode 3

Sharpes Festung: Episode 3

Geschrieben von Bernard Cornwell

Erzählt von Torsten Michaelis


Sharpes Festung: Episode 3

Geschrieben von Bernard Cornwell

Erzählt von Torsten Michaelis

Bewertungen:
4/5 (6 Bewertungen)
Länge:
9 Stunden
Freigegeben:
May 27, 2011
ISBN:
9783863461430
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Richard Sharpe ist mit dabei bei der Belagerung von Gawilgarh, Dezember 1803 in Indien. Er hat Probleme mit seinem Rang in der Armee. Er hat Probleme mit Hakeswill. Er hat Probleme mit manchen seiner Vorgesetzten. Nur mit einer jungen englischen Frau, die von einem Offizier wie eine Sklavin gehalten wird, hat er eigentlich keine Probleme. Die Belagerung und der Sturm auf die Bergfestung Gawilgarh soll ihm Gelegenheit geben, sich zu bewähren und einige seiner Probleme zu lösen.

Freigegeben:
May 27, 2011
ISBN:
9783863461430
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

BERNARD CORNWELL is the author of the acclaimed New York Times bestselling Saxon Tales series, which includes The Last Kingdom, The Pale Horseman, Lords of the North, Sword Song, The Burning Land, Death of Kings, The Pagan Lord, and, most recently, The Empty Throne and Warriors of the Storm, and which serves as the basis for the hit television series The Last Kingdom. He lives with his wife on Cape Cod and in Charleston, South Carolina.


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4.2
6 Bewertungen / 14 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    I did not want to read about Colonialism, war, or English soldiers. I felt as though I was doing battle with the author all through this book. I thought I would abandon it, but would decide after reading just one more page. Twenty to fifty pages later, I was still reading. This happened several times until I passed the point of no return and could hardly put the book down. I confess to skimming a few portions of the enemy gloating and scheming, but when it came to Sharpe, I read every word. Cornwell has the gift of transporting you to the time and place you are reading about. The realism of the battles and life in those times is both horrifying and engrossing. Happy to have hung in there with this story.
  • (4/5)
    Another enjoyable book from Bernard Cornwell. I like how Sharpe finally gets some vindication in this book, and I can say that without giving anything away. The book was rather short, and at some point I would like a bit more character building with Sharpe and his personal thoughts, but that is a tough criticism as the book takes place completely in India where the army was doing nothing but marching and fighting. I will be continuing with this series and now count Cornwell as one of my favorite authors.
  • (5/5)
    While the Battle of Assaye (covered in Sharpe's Triumph) was a major defeat for the Mahratti forces of the confedration of western Indian kingdoms, Lt. Dodd, the renegade Englishman who has become Sharpe's personal target for revenge for the killing of Colonel McCandless, has retreated with his intact regiment, Dodd's Cobras, to the impregnable mountain fortress of Gawilghur. There, with the remnants of the Mahratti army, he plans to defeat the English army under Wellesley which must atttack and defeat Dodd if the English are to have any control and peace in the region. Confident of defending the fortress, Dodd intends to become Rajah of western India after destroying Wellesley's forces at Gawilghur.Meanwhile, Sharpe--now Ensign Sharpe, having been promoted after saving Wellesley's life at Assaye--is miserable trying to fit in as an officer in a Scots regiment. He is also forced to coexist with his Nemesis, Sgt. Hakeswill, who has lost none of his enthusiasm to see Sharpe killed (preferably slowly and in great pain) and to steal the Sultan Tippoo's jewels which Hakeswill now knows Sharpe owns. Incapable by his malevolent nature of refraining from whatever evil comes to hand, Hakeswill, partnered by a degenerate officer, steals weapons and other military stores and sells them to the enemy. Sharpe discovers the treasonous scam by accident, and this provides Hakeswill an opportunity to kill Sharpe and steal his jewels.Sharpe is captured by Hakeswill and turned over to the enemy, but Sharpe manages to escape. He rejoins the army as it prepares to assault Gawilghur. The rest, as they say, is history.Oh yes, there is a love interest, but in this book, Sharpe is the object of a double whammy as he loses not one but two women!Cornwell has few peers for this particular genere of historical action-adventure. The book is well researched; Cornwell provides an affterword of several pages explaining where he distorted history for the sake of the plot, and what the fortress looks like today.You care about the characters--you worry about Sharpe and his friends, and curse his enemies.Cornwell writes batttle scenes as well as Patrick O'Brain ever wrote the naval equivalent for the Aubrey/Maturin series; it would not be a surprise if Cornwell used O'Brian as an overall model. The one difference, I would say, is that O'Brian wrote memorable female characters who were integral to the series, whereas Cornwell's women are indifferently drawn and forgettable. Whether he emulated O'Brian or not, Cornwell's Sharpe series is outstanding in its own right. The climactic battle for Gawilghur is a real thriller--I could not put the book down until I finished, racing through the pages to the end.Highly recommended.
  • (3/5)
    The last of Sharpe's India prequel trilogy, Sharpe's Fortress focuses more on the details of difficult siege warfare and interstate conflict in 18th Century India. Entertaining and worthwhile to gain a better perspective of the character's history prior to the Napoleonic Wars.
  • (3/5)
    Three Sharpes in a row is probably too much of a "just good enough" thing; time to take a break. The setting isn't as fresh as the first two India books and when Sharpe turns into Conan the Barbarian it feels a little out of place. I'll return to the series but it's time for other things.
  • (4/5)
    The three Sharpe's novels set in India are among my favorites. They're longer and Cornwell does more with them. More than anything, they provide background to the Sharpe's stories that occur in the Peninsula. This is Sharpe's first experience as an officer, an ensign assigned to the well-trained 74th Regt. They don't need him, so he is detailed to logistical support duties which find him immediately assigned as an assistant to Captain Torrance, corrupt supply officer. Not surprisingly Torrance is in league with Sharpe's old nemesis Obadiah Hakeswill. Sharpe always finds a way to circumvent these "inside" problems and gets to participate on the impregnable fortress of Gawilghur. Cornwell is so adept at telling battle stories on a level that is understandable. He tells us just enough to picture the battle as a big picture, as well as helping us understand the soldier's individual role in the battle. Yes the story is formulaic, but many of the characters-McCandless, Stokes, and Sharpe himself are quite endearing. It's kept me coming back for more.
  • (5/5)
    Incredible. The action never lets up until the final page and I absolutely loved every minute of it. I thought Sharpe's Triumph was excellent but this is far better. Moves to the top of favorite books for 2009.
  • (5/5)
    Tells of the Siege of Gawilghur in India. Richard Sharpe is raised from Sergeant to Ensign and confronts his old enemies William Dodd and Sergeant Hakeswill. The main section of the book includes a fairly accurate description of the siege.For me this is probably the best of the series so far.
  • (5/5)
    The final book in the India trilogy brings back Dodd and Hakeswill to dog Richard Sharpe. The action leads to the Siege of Gawilghur, another great battle described by a master storyteller. The book contains everything that makes the Sharpe series stand out as one of the best historical series being written.
  • (4/5)
    I liked the PBS series & found the books very enjoyable, but as an audio book, it really shined. Cornwell's historical afterwords, which set straight any inaccuracies, are wonderful, too. But take my star rating with a grain of salt. I didn't find this book quite as good as the others I've read, just liked it in this format better.

    The story suffered from quite a bit of repetition at times. For instance, the area they assaulted must have been described half a dozen times until it not only bored, but confused me. There were several other points & motivations that were hammered half to death, too.

    Sharpe's actions & motivations didn't always ring true. He was too cavalier in some situations & too untrusting in others. Still, if I just went with it, the story was excellent. As usual, Cornwell made the time, situation, & landscape pop into a realistic whole that practically transported me. I can't wait to see if the library has the next one & plan to 'read' more of Cornwell's books like this. He has quite a few that I've heard great things about.
  • (5/5)
    Very little time has passed since the last of Sharpe's adventures, in which he saved Arthur Wellesley's life and the future Iron Duke made him an officer. As we start this new chapter in his life, Sharpe is getting a foul taste of just how hard it is to be an officer promoted "up from the ranks" in the British army of 1803. He's not of the gentry, so gets no respect from enlisted men or officers, and is coming to regret having tried so hard to get this leg up he's gotten.

    But soon he's got bigger problems. Because both of his great enemies, the terrifying and capable British deserter Major Dodd, who is killing his way to becoming Lord of All India fighting for the Mahrathas, and the twitching, malevolent Sergeant Hakeswill, who has been trying for two novels now to get Sharpe killed out of sheer spite and hatred. The one has been chased, along with his army and allies, into India's great fortress in the sky, Gawilghur; the other has turned up among the British soldiers trying to solve the puzzle of how to take that impregnable place, destroy the Mahratha army there, and bring Dodd to justice. Oh, my.

    The star of this novel is definitely the fortress itself, hence the title. Imagine George R.R. Martin's Eyrie, defended by thumping huge cannons and approachable only via a narrow ravine that is basically just a shooting gallery for said cannon. But before you can get to the ravine, you have to pound your way through an outer fort. While the fort's defenders shoot at you with thumping huge cannons.

    Fortunately for Sharpe and his pals, the walls of these forts are old and ill-maintained. Also, the people in charge within are a cowardly princeling who just wants to be left alone to sport with his wives and concubines, and the enemy rajah's brother, who is quite a capable soldier, but whose faith in his men is so weak that he won't let that splendid attack dog, Dodd, do anything but kick his heels and take the occasional potshot with one of those newfangled rifle thingies. So the British are free to build their road right up to the perfect spot to hammer away at the walls with their cannon, and everybody has enough time on their hands to plot against each other. Because Hakeswill. And his buddy Captain Torrance, who already had it in for Sharpe because Sharpe's first act upon being assigned to help the Captain is to expose the Captain's treachery. D'oh!

    And I haven't even talked about the treachery among the bad guys. Oh, is it delicious.

    Bappoo's survivors, betrayed by Dodd, were trapped between two forces. They were stranded in a hell above emptiness, a slaughter in the high hills. There were screams as men tumbled to their deaths far beneath and still the fire kept coming. It kept coming until there was nothing left but quivering men crouching in terror on a road that was rank with the stench of blood, and then the redcoats moved forward with bayonets.

    Yowza! Betrayal and the Ravine of Death!

    Again, the tension of whether or not Sharpe is going to survive all of this is robbed of the modern reader who knows he's got a future with a rifle company in Europe, but Cornwell finds plenty of other ways to keep the reader eagerly turning pages. We don't know how Sharpe is going to get out of his own personal very difficult predicaments, just as we don't know (unless we peek at Wikipedia or something) how the hell the British are going to get through the Ravine of Death, or anything else, for that matter. Once again, Cornwell has done a skillful job of combining the exploits of real historical figures (Oh, Colonel Kenny!) with those of his semi-fictional villains (Dodd) and his own characters (Hakeswill, Major John Stokes, Sharpe himself) into something seamless and compulsively readable.

    Most gratifying to me is the return of Major Stokes, whom you may recall from my last go-around in Sharpe's universe became quite a favorite of mine. Here he's put in charge of building the road that will allow the British to haul their cannons, shot, powder, and selves into attack range and of cobbling together some semblance of defenses for them as they haul. He doesn't get a lot of scenes, but he shines in all his nerdy glory in those he gets, and as one of Sharpe's few allies, quite well deserves to.

    Also fun is Ahmed, an Arab boy whom Sharpe rescues from the precursor battle that opens the novel and who becomes Sharpe's fanatically loyal servant. Several major plot points revolve around this little hellion, whose command of the King's English improves somewhat over the course of the story but since he's learned it from Sharpe contains rather more "buggers" than a schoolmaster might like.

    It continues to take almost all the willpower I have not to just plow through all of these Sharpe novels in one swoop. They're wonderfully written, utterly absorbing, thrilling, fun, bloody, character-driven, full of dashing heroics and madcap schemes -- everything I like in a novel. And they keep getting better, these books!

    But I think if I did just go all Sharpe, all the time, I might end up doing something foolish when I was done. Like joining the army. Which would be pretty stupid. What would they do with a 42-year-old fat chick who can't even shoot straight, I ask you?
  • (4/5)
    The last of the first three 'India' Sharpe books. Always fun.
  • (5/5)
    Yelling, screaming, blood, war, sex, love, revenge, claymores, more blood, Highland soldiers and Richard Sharpe, what more can I say? Once again Cornwell impresses me with his quick wit and prosaic finesse and succeeds in bringing the reader to the frontline of Britain’s campaign in India. Revenge is sweet for Sharpe and the reader in this highly audacious final chapter of the Indian campaign.
  • (5/5)
    Whoo! I think this is my favorite of the ones I’ve read thus far. I can’t imagine the amount of research Cornwell puts into his books—he even traveled to India to visit this fortress so that he could accurately describe the sheer cliffs, turns in narrow corridors, and the layout of the structure. Very impressive to be sure.I do want to throttle Sharpe for making the same mistake he did the first 2 times he tried to kill Hakeswill… but Cornwell didn’t have much choice, since Hakeswille will be around well into the series. There are times I feel slightly sorry for the twitchy sergeant, such as when he mentions the fact that as a child, he was hanged. It was his small size that allowed him to survive the gallows. A horrible experience for any child to survive, and I’m sure that would mess with anybody’s personality… But yeah, the rest of the time he is just a nasty creature.Torrance, though, he was great! He was just so… hedonistic, that it was funny. He’s one of those antagonists that you can’t help but to like. At least I couldn’t help it, anyway.And another favorite new character: Ahmed. Little Ahmed is just adorable. Poor kid. At least he was able to repay Sharpe’s saving his life—which reminds me: the arena scene between Sharpe and the two strongmen is $%^& awesome!