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Unthinkable: An Extraordinary Journey Through the World's Strangest Brains

Unthinkable: An Extraordinary Journey Through the World's Strangest Brains

Geschrieben von Helen Thomson

Erzählt von Helen Thomson


Unthinkable: An Extraordinary Journey Through the World's Strangest Brains

Geschrieben von Helen Thomson

Erzählt von Helen Thomson

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (90 Bewertungen)
Länge:
7 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 26, 2018
ISBN:
9780062847959
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

A prizewinning journalist with a background in neuroscience, Helen Thomson spent years tracking down people who live with the world's most extraordinary neurological disorders—like a man who tried to break his back because his legs no longer felt like his own, and another who believed that he was dead for nine years. Not content to simply read about these cases on paper, Thomson reached out to ten people with these afflictions, and they agreed to tell her their stories.

Leaving behind the scans and the clinical histories, Unthinkable ties the first-ever interviews with the people who have these rare conditions together with cutting-edge science. Through these incredible tales, Thomson casts a light on the chaos that the human mind can create. She shows us how these strange conditions hold the keys to unlocking the biggest mysteries of the human brain, and provide a deeper understanding of the human condition itself.

Combining careful observation with bold science and vibrant storytelling, Unthinkable takes us on a deep dive into the weirdest corners of our brain, and helps us to see our own creativity, our emotions, and our consciousness more clearly.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 26, 2018
ISBN:
9780062847959
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

Helen Thomson is a writer and consultant with New Scientist magazine and was shortlisted as Best Science Journalist in the British Journalism Awards. She has won several other awards, including media fellowships at both Harvard and MIT and the Best Newcomer in the ABSW Science Writers Awards for Britain and Ireland in 2010. She has also written for The Guardian, The Washington Post, The Daily Mail and Nature. She lives in London.


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Was die anderen über Unthinkable denken

4.4
90 Bewertungen / 8 Rezensionen
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  • (5/5)
    A fun book, similar to the man who mistook his wife for a hat by Oliver Sacks though not as good. Some of the same information. On the other hand she explores the rational mind more, I think. A bit brief I. Explaining the complexities of the mind as compared to describing the disorder, a thing she did well.
  • (5/5)
    A very interest, easy read. Written at a level for those without a strong science background.
  • (5/5)
    Thoroughly enjoyed this book. Would definitely recommend it to anyone who is interested to know more about how human brains function
  • (3/5)
    I don't think the author was the best choice to narrate this book... It's really interesting book - but read. The audio version, not so great.
  • (4/5)
    In "Unthinkable," science writer Helen Thomson explores oddities of the human brain in men and women who have unusual disorders or abilities. Thomson begins by providing a bit of history from ancient Egypt, when the brain was "an organ of little interest" and the heart took center stage. Plato placed more emphasis on the brain's importance, while his student, Aristotle, "continued to argue that the mind was contained in the heart." Meanwhile, Galen, a Greek physician at the time of the Roman Empire, glimpsed the brains of wounded gladiators "whose skulls had been torn apart in combat." However, it would take many more centuries for scientists to recognize that our brains help determine how we think, behave, move, speak, and dream.

    These days, researchers use functional MRIs, EEGs, and CAT scans to study the brain's anatomy, chemistry, electrical activity, and the ways in which the various regions communicate with one another. The focus of this book is on brains that do not perform predictably. Most of us have heard of twenty-five year old Phineas Gage, a railroad worker in 1848 who was hit by a rod that "flew up through his jaw, traveled behind his eye, made its way through the left-hand side of his brain, and shot out the other side." Although this accident did not kill him, the damage that Gage suffered changed him from a kind and good-tempered man into an aggressive, rude, and profane one. Thomson also introduces us to various people who cannot feel fear; hear music that is not there; have uncanny recollections of the past; are convinced that a limb does not belong to them and should be amputated; and feel other people's pain--literally.

    The author's well-researched case studies, which are reminiscent of those described so unforgettably and compassionately by the late Oliver Sacks, are disturbing and intriguing, and will interest anyone who is fascinated by the brain's mysteries. "Unthinkable" is enlightening but not always entertaining. For some readers, it will be unnerving to encounter individuals whose rare conditions make daily life so challenging. Still, it is instructive to reflect on the complexity, versatility, and unpredictability of this vital organ. The brain is likely one of the last frontiers, which neuroscientists will continue to explore in an attempt to uncover its many remaining secrets.
  • (4/5)
    A science journalist’s interest in rare brain disorders takes her around the world as she meets people with lycanthropy, audio hallucinations, Cotard delusion or Walking Corpse Syndrome (ie thinking you’re dead). I listened to the audiobook, read by Thomson herself, & I felt all the earnestness and hard work that she poured into her research as well as her fascination for the subject. #scienceseptember
  • (4/5)
    3.5 Our brains are capable of so many things, such a complex organ, and the least understood. This book highlights the many ways a glitch in the circuitry of the brain can cause some unique, and at times harrowing conditions. I was drawn to this book because of a show on TV I saw a while back. It featured some people who can remember in detail every day of their lives. I have a pretty good memory, but nothing close to that, but I was curious about how that type of memory came to be, what were the changes in the brain. Memory as a whole interests me, as the closer I get to the age where memory supposedly drops off, can that be prevented?This is the first topic covered, the science behind memory, well explained in understandable terms by the author who even offers tips on how to improve memory. The other sections cover other conditions that can manifest, such as synsthesia, a person who believes they are dead, a man who turns into a tiger. How they live with these conditions, and again the science behind them. Never really felt the connection as a reader to these people, though I thought the science was explained well, and I enjoyed the authors musings. I think if you enjoyed the books of the late Oliver Sacks, you will enjoy this. It is both interesting and informative.ARC from Edelweiss.
  • (3/5)
    A good if somewhat bizarre collection of biographies of different people with strange and interesting brains that make you reevaluate the nature of humanity. I think there’s insight here and some of it is genuinely fascinating. Some of it however drags a little. A good book.