Genießen Sie diesen Titel jetzt und Millionen mehr, in einer kostenlosen Testversion

Kostenlos für 30 Tage, dann für $9.99/Monat. Jederzeit kündbar.

The Winemaker's Wife

The Winemaker's Wife

Geschrieben von Kristin Harmel

Erzählt von Robin Eller, Lisa Flanagan und Madeleine Maby


The Winemaker's Wife

Geschrieben von Kristin Harmel

Erzählt von Robin Eller, Lisa Flanagan und Madeleine Maby

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (485 Bewertungen)
Länge:
11 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Aug 13, 2019
ISBN:
9781508286370
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Beschreibung

From the author of the “engrossing” (People) and “poignant” (Booklist) international best seller The Room on Rue Amélie comes a remarkable and moving story of love, danger, and betrayal: two women in France in the darkest days of World War II and another in present-day America on a quest to uncover the secret that connects them.

At the dawn of the Second World War, Inès is the young wife of Michel, owner of the House of Chauveau, a small champagne winery nestled among rolling vineyards near Reims, France. Marrying into a storied champagne empire was supposed to be a dream come true, but Inès feels increasingly isolated, purposely left out of the business by her husband; his chef de cave, Theo; and Theo’s wife, Sarah.

But these disappointments pale in comparison to the increasing danger from German forces pouring across the border. At first, it’s merely the Nazi weinführer coming to demand the choicest champagne for Hitler’s cronies, but soon, there are rumors of Jewish townspeople being rounded up and sent east to an unspeakable fate. The war is on their doorstep, and no one in Inès’s life is safe — least of all Sarah, whose father is Jewish, or Michel, who has recklessly begun hiding munitions for the Résistance in the champagne caves. Inès realizes she has to do something to help.

Sarah feels as lost as Inès does, but she doesn’t have much else in common with Michel’s young wife. Inès seems to have it made, not least of all because as a Catholic, she’s “safe.” Sarah, on the other hand, is terrified about the fate of her parents — and about her own future as the Germans begin to rid the Champagne region of Jews. When Sarah makes a dangerous decision to follow her heart in a desperate bid to find some meaning in the ruin, it endangers the lives of all those she cares about — and the champagne house they’ve all worked so hard to save.

In the present, Liv Kent has just lost her job — and her marriage. Her wealthy but aloof Grandma Edith, sensing that Liv needs a change of scenery before she hits rock bottom, insists that Liv accompany her on a trip to France. But the older woman has an ulterior motive — and some difficult but important information to share with her granddaughter. As Liv begins to uncover long-buried family secrets, she finds herself slowly coming back to life. When past and present intertwine at last, she may finally find a way forward, along a difficult road that leads straight to the winding caves beneath the House of Chauveau.

Perfect for fans of Kristin Hannah’s The Nightingale and Kate Quinn’s The Alice Network, The Winemaker’s Wife is an evocative and gorgeously wrought novel that examines how the choices we make in our darkest hours can profoundly change our lives — and how hope can come from the places we least expect.

Freigegeben:
Aug 13, 2019
ISBN:
9781508286370
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

Kristin Harmel is the New York Times bestselling author of a dozen novels including The Book of Lost Names, The Winemaker’s Wife, The Room on Rue Amélie, and The Sweetness of Forgetting. She is also the cofounder and cohost of the popular web series, Friends and Fiction. She lives in Orlando, Florida.


Ähnlich wie The Winemaker's Wife

Ähnliche Hörbücher


Rezensionen

Was die anderen über The Winemaker's Wife denken

4.4
485 Bewertungen / 46 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    It was a wonderful story. A deep insight into the French resistance movement during WW2.
  • (5/5)
    Fantastic! I loved every minute of listening to this book. The dialogue, the storyline, the romance, the history… simply beautiful.
  • (4/5)
    So many stories of this time in history. This touched my heart and made me remember how fragile life is.
  • (5/5)
    Amazing book!! I was sad to see it end!! Lots of twists and turns.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent! The end a total surprise! Characters so real. Recommend
  • (5/5)
    Women stands for woman?I really enjoyed, give you force and forgiveness
  • (5/5)
    Among the best stories in this genre that I have listened to. WWII in France was made alive in the Vineyards of Champagne as seen thru the lives of some interesting characters. The audiobook narration was ok, but I could have done without the affected accents. Overall a recommended listen or read
  • (5/5)
    I loved the going back and forth from the past to the present. I fell in love with these characters. I also loved reading about the champagne!!
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed the stories and part of the narration, but some of the narration during the 1940's parts had oddball accents that didn't fit.
  • (5/5)
    Incredible book! So well written it keeps you guessing and on the edge of your seat the whole way! It is beautifully written. Makes me love Champagne even more!
  • (5/5)
    So much beauty and heartache in this wonderful love story.
  • (5/5)
    I was really drawn into this book. Enjoyed the two timelines from wartime in France and then 2019 in France. So many sacrifices in those terrible times. Helps to appreciate my life today.
  • (2/5)
    Weak women as main characters drive me bonkers. And this is that main character. It’s easy to see what’s gonna happen and the women’s’ voices are so irritating that I couldn’t stick with it.
  • (4/5)
    Ok,there were parts of the book I really liked, it was definitely a bit slow at times. Details that don’t add up bug me and maybe if the book was set in 2000 instead of 2019 it would have been a better overall read. To think a 99-year old woman taking a back-to-back France to New York trip is a bit much ... and the age around the characters in the end don’t seem off.
  • (5/5)
    The book was real intriguing and had so much information about the era.
  • (4/5)
    Decent story and easy to follow. Well put together and everything came together in the end.
  • (2/5)
    The story was lovely and well told. Unfortunately, the main character was infuriating - spoiled and unaware and beyond irritating. She ruined the book for me.
  • (4/5)
    Excellent! A bit of a slow start, but oh so good!
  • (4/5)
    Very good but very emotional book. It was a well thought out story with an ending I felt did the story justice.
  • (5/5)
    Beautiful story! The beginning is a little slow but the context is worth rounding out the story line! Beautiful!!!
  • (3/5)
    Loved it after I finished the entire book. However while reading I felt it was dragged out a bit too much. Especially the love story between Liv and Jillian, there was no need to stretch Liv knowing Jillian’s wife was dead. It was obvious to the readers. The Liv character was annoying. It could be the author’s way of characterizing Americans, Liv’s mom changing boyfriends every month and Liv sounding like 18 year old at 42. Didn’t appreciate that. But the story, and the setting were great.
  • (4/5)
    The story was good and definitely kept my interest but the narration was weak.
  • (2/5)
    The story is average but the narration is weak and the accents truly awful. The combination makes the book difficult to listen to.
  • (5/5)
    Great story with plenty of interesting facts about the region and the time period. The ending was sloppy and sweet and convoluted but I loved it.
    You can learn great things from fiction!
  • (3/5)
    The book opened okay, I thought it would be interesting, but the writing was just...sophomoric and I couldn't bring myself to finish.
  • (4/5)
    Probably because I’m so enthralled with wine history and how it all played out with Hitler’s invasion of France during WWII, I was engrossed in the novel ‘The Winemaker’s Wife.’ The story alternates between two time periods, the present day, in which newly-divorced Liv Kent’s 99-year-old grandmother, Edith, arrives from France to whisk her away to Reims. The story unfolds, with flashbacks to the past, in which Edith was active in the underground French Resistance to topple the Hitler regime. The story centers around a fictitious winemaker, Michel Chaveau and his young, idealistic bride, Inés, who operate the Chaveau Winery with their head winemaker Theo Laurent and his Jewish wife Celine. As the Germans occupy Reims and the surrounding countryside, lives are put into jeopardy with individual allegiances in question. Edith bears a remarkable secret from the past which she plans to share with Liv in her own time. While the story may seem predictable in some ways, I loved the historical references to real-life characters from WWII, such as Count Robert-Jean De Vogüé, the head of Moet & Chandon who was a Resistance leader, as well as Otto Klaebisch, the German wineführer in Champagne during the war. There were also some references to wine making, which I found very interesting. For example, during the war, wines designated for German consumption were often aged in dirty bottles with sediment and with the use of poor corks. All in all, despite its predictability, this was a thought-provoking novel, to which I designated four stars.
  • (5/5)
    Yet another facet of the Second World War. This time the champagne growing region in France and the inhabitants resistance to the Germans. This is interspersed with a 2019 divorces whose French grandma insists she come to Paris. Engrossing story with some interesting side notes about how champagne is made.
  • (2/5)
    Not the best WWII historical fiction - more of a soap opera with shallow characters.
  • (3/5)
    Story was okay but contrived and characters lacked depth.
  • (4/5)
    Overall the plot was quite interesting starting from the ideas out of the twist, from the usual scandalous revelations to mutual concession of the characters no doubt It was indeed a marvelous storyline but all throughout the story I’ve seen some weak points ( at least in my own opinion ) for example as Celine survived the labor camp in Auschwitz and came back to France to see her son after the war and find-out that champagnia (winery) was taken and already been managed by somebody else sure she could have leave a message or dug further the whereabouts of Ines before believing that they’re dead, and given the fact that she believed they’re dead she didn’t even bother to asked where their bodies were laid, isn’t it odd? Another thing she could also pay a visit to Edith’s place the fact that she knows where Inez usually is when she’s not around but she didn’t. After reading it felt like something is lacking, some scenes felt like intertwined but on the other hand, emotions we’re plausibly strong as the third person narrates.