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The Paris Secret: An epic and heartbreaking love story set in World War Two

The Paris Secret: An epic and heartbreaking love story set in World War Two

Geschrieben von Lily Graham

Erzählt von Esther Wane


The Paris Secret: An epic and heartbreaking love story set in World War Two

Geschrieben von Lily Graham

Erzählt von Esther Wane

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (9 Bewertungen)
Länge:
6 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Feb 26, 2019
ISBN:
9781977341099
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

The last time Valerie was in Paris, she was three years old, running from the Nazis, away from the only home she had ever known.

Now as a young woman all alone in the world, Valerie must return to Paris, to the bookshop and her sole surviving relative, her grandfather Vincent, the only person who knows the truth about what happened to her parents. As she gets to know grumpy, taciturn Vincent again, she hears a tragic story of Nazi-occupied Paris, a doomed love affair, and a mother willing to sacrifice everything for her beloved daughter.

Can Valerie and Vincent help each other to mend the wounds of the past? Valerie isn't after a fairytale ending, she only wants the truth. But what is the one devastating secret that Vincent is determined to keep from his granddaughter?

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Feb 26, 2019
ISBN:
9781977341099
Format:
Hörbuch


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4.6
9 Bewertungen / 5 Rezensionen
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  • (4/5)
    Lovely story if you like WW2 - great narrative
  • (5/5)
    Really enjoyed the audiobook thanks, the narrator did a great job and I enjoyed the story telling of the book.
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely loved this book!!! My only complaint is that it's too short and I wanted to keep reading about Valerie and her family. The book was beautifully written. I felt like I was there with Valerie working in the bookshop and with Mireille while trying to survive during the Occupation. I loved the cover of the book and I am so glad it caught my eye.Valerie was sent to live in England with relatives when she was three years old. Valerie knew her mother was dead and believed she had no other relatives alive. When Valerie is twenty she learns her grandfather is alive in Paris. Valerie ends up getting a job working in his bookshop, but uses an assumed name. She doesn't know how he would react to Valerie being his granddaughter. Valerie tries to find out as much as she can about her mother. The book starts out in the present as Valerie tells her story to a woman she meets on a train. It alternates between Valerie in 1962 and Mireille in Occupied Paris during the 1940's . I loved the story, characters and writing style. I loved getting to know Valerie and Mireille. Mireille's story was heartbreaking. I hope Valerie sees that her father truly loved her mother and his baby. I wonder how everything would have turned out after the war? Dupont was quite the character. His book ordering system was crazy. I'm not sure how anyone found anything. He had books in order according to whether or not the author had last his/her mind. Add in Clotilde and Freddy and you have a great mix of characters. I can't imagine how the children born with Nazi fathers were treated after the war. Innocent children being punished for simply being born. The book was very heartfelt. It was full of loss and sadness but also love, happiness and forgiveness.I definitely recommend this book and look forward to reading more by the author. Thanks to NetGalley, Bookouture and the author, Lily Graham, for a free electronic ARC of this novel.
  • (5/5)
    Oh, this is such a gorgeous read. It's a fabulous unfolding of a story, one that I found that little bit different to other similar reads. On a train from Moscow to Paris, a young woman named Annie meets an elderly lady named Valerie. After striking up a conversation, Valerie tells Annie the story of her life. And it's quite a life. We travel back first to 1962 when Valerie left her home in England to go to Paris after having just discovered that she has a relative she knew nothing of, her grandfather, Vincent. He's a grumpy old man, and a fairly typical Parisian. He won't allow Valerie to drink tea and has a rather unusual way of cataloguing books in his chaotic little bookshop.We also go even further back to the Second World War as we, and Valerie, learn about her roots, her mother and why she was sent away by Vincent when she was only three. What Valerie learns is absolutely heartbreaking. One of the things that made this book stand out for me at first glance was the setting of the bookshop. I wasn't wrong when I thought it would make the story even more interesting. I loved reading about it and hearing Vincent's rather unfathomable reasons for hating certain writers and loving others. It was so vivid that I could imagine myself there, browsing the books and listening to him and Valerie bickering.I loved Valerie. She's quietly strong and determined, which she needed to be to deal with Vincent. But I have to say that I loved him too. You know those men who are gruff but underneath they have the best heart? That's Vincent. The story Valerie comes to know about her background, her early years, where she came from, is utterly devastating, especially the conclusion of that strand of the story. I must admit I was hoping for a miracle but I didn't get one, and the passing of twenty years had done nothing to dim what happened in Vincent's mind. I could really feel his heartbreak over the past.The ending is lovely and really sweet and made me sigh with contentment. All in all, it's a fantastic book and a wonderful story with some really memorable characters. I shall be checking out more of Lily Graham's books.
  • (4/5)
    I read a lot of WWII fiction and this love story set in Paris during WWII was definitely a winner in this genre. It was a real page turner with some smiles and some tears with a wonderful ending. It was a fairly short book and I think it should have been longer with more character development but overall I enjoyed it and definitely recommend it.The novel begins with Valerie in her 90s taking the train back to Paris. As she tells her story to her seatmate on the train, her past comes alive. When Valerie was 3, she was sent from Paris to live with her aunt in England at the end of WWII. She knew that her mother had died but wanted to know why her grandfather didn't want to raise her. In her early 20s, she manages to get a job in her grandfather's book store in Paris. She doesn't tell him who she is when she starts her job but tries to get more information about her family. Her aunt warned her ‘He gave you away for a reason, Val. I know that you want this fairy-tale reunion but I’m just not sure you’re going to get it.’ but she still persists in trying to find out her history. Will Valerie and her grandfather be able to help each other or will the truth open up wounds that will never heal?I enjoyed this short trip to Paris and wish this was a real bookstore that I could visit. This is a wonderful story about family and love and how they manage to exist even during the worst times. It's a book full of sadness at what could have been but also joy at the discovery of new friends and family. I highly recommend it.