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A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush

A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush

Geschrieben von Eric Newby

Erzählt von James Bryce


A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush

Geschrieben von Eric Newby

Erzählt von James Bryce

Bewertungen:
3.5/5 (8 Bewertungen)
Länge:
10 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Nov 14, 2019
ISBN:
9780008366582
Format:
Hörbuch

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Beschreibung

A classic of travel writing, ‘A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush’ is Eric Newby’s iconic account of his journey through one of the most remote and beautiful wildernesses on earth.
Freigegeben:
Nov 14, 2019
ISBN:
9780008366582
Format:
Hörbuch

Auch als verfügbar...

Auch als buch verfügbarBuch

Über den Autor

Eric Newby was born in London in 1919. During World War II, he served in the Special Boat Section and was captured. He married the girl who helped him to escape, and for the next 50 years she was at his side on many adventures. After the war, he worked in the fashion business and book publishing but travelled on a grand scale, sometimes as the Travel Editor for the Observer. He was made CBE and awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award of the British Guild of Travel Writers. He died in 2006.


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3.6
8 Bewertungen / 8 Rezensionen
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  • (3/5)
    A wonderful travel adventure from the end of the golden age of exploration. Newby is best when he describes with humor and self-deprecation their woeful lack of credentials in the matter of exploration and mountain climbing. After four days of practice in the relative safety of Wales, Newby and his companion Hugh Carless travel to Afghanistan and the Hindu Kush, attempt to climb the 20,000 ft Mir Samir and trek through Nuristan in northern Afghanistan. The fact that they accomplished all they did is a great testament to their courage and perhaps naive luck. I can't believe any such journey would be possible today.
  • (4/5)
    A self-deprecating fashion industry Brit (he's careful not to describe appropriate experience - he served in British Special Forces in WWII - this omission helps the story's charm), gathers up incomplete, inadequate provisions and goes on a fun little jaunt in vacation spots north of Kabul. Who knew Afghanistan could be so wonerfully droll...
  • (5/5)
    A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush by Eric Newby. Superb travel writing. Newby abruptly gave up his career in the fashion industry, in England in the 1950s, and went off on a mad hike through the mountains of Afghanistan, after taking a four-day hiking course in Wales. Funny stuff, although Newby, unlike Bill Bryson and other popular travel writers of today, does not load his prose with funny commentary or metaphors. He describes his adventures--an appalling transaction with a Persian car mechanic, being detained for manslaughter somewhere in Armenia, the irritating qualities of the Nuristani tribes he encounters--with a spareness that leaves the reader to decide if the incident is supposed to be funny or tragic. I would love to travel in that part of the world--every account I've read about Afghanistan has made it seem compelling and gorgeous, but, obviously, it's not a tourist destination these days. Maybe within my lifetime. Also, this book has the best last line I've ever read, anywhere.
  • (4/5)
    I think the most endearing aspect of A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush is the fact that Eric Newby readily admits he had no idea what he was doing when he and a friend decided to explore the Nuristan mountain range in Afghanistan. With very little training and an unclear vision of what was in store, Newby's A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush is little more than a witty, humorous journal. Yet, almost by default it offers intelligent, observant insight into Afghan cultures and terrains few Westerners have ever experienced. Newby begins his tale with the idea of exploring the Hindu Kush mountain range. Recruiting his friend Hugh, they "practice" climbing by scrambling up and down a rock face in Wales. There they learn the tools and of trade and suddenly they are experts. From there, with tongue-in-cheek humor, Newby delightfully journals their subsequent adventures in northeastern Afghanistan.
  • (1/5)
    I didn't get on with this at all and gave up reading halfway through. It was a reading group book, and I usually try to finish them even if I don't like it, but I seemed to be actively avoiding reading this one! It was a bit too "jolly hockeysticks" for me. Also the edition I was reading had slightly fuzzy type and the maps weren't at all clear - if both of those had been better I might have made it further!
  • (5/5)
    An enjoyable recount by Eric Newby of his first adventure as a mountain climber in the Hindu Kush.
  • (4/5)
    They just don't make 'em like Eric Newby any more. Possibly the funniest travel book ever.
  • (3/5)
    Funny but prejudiced, this is a fairly entertaining story about one of those nutty British guys who gets a crazy idea.He decides to walk through some of the roughest terrain in the world, in Afghanistan. His attitude toward difficulties is great, but his attitude toward the people who lived there was...condescending. This book was just okay, and the ending was terribly rushed. Not really recommended.