Genießen Sie diesen Titel jetzt und Millionen mehr, in einer kostenlosen Testversion

Nur $9.99/Monat nach der Testversion. Jederzeit kündbar.

Die Chemie des Todes

Die Chemie des Todes

Geschrieben von Simon Beckett

Erzählt von Johannes Steck und Matern von Marschall


Die Chemie des Todes

Geschrieben von Simon Beckett

Erzählt von Johannes Steck und Matern von Marschall

Bewertungen:
4/5 (25 Bewertungen)
Länge:
8 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
May 31, 2013
ISBN:
9783899647327
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Nach dem Tod seiner Frau und der gemeinsamen Tochter kehrt David Hunter dem illustren Dasein als berühmtester Gerichtsmediziner Englands den Rücken und wird Assistent eines Landarztes. Eines Tages finden zwei Jungen beim Spielen in dem beschaulichen Örtchen in Devonshire die Leiche einer Frau. Hunter gerät als Fremder im Dorf und Freund der toten Außenseiterin unter Tatverdacht. Als sich herausstellt, daß er ein Forensik-Experte ist, drängt ihn die Polizei zur Mithilfe. Es beginnt ein Wettlauf mit der Zeit, da bereits eine zweite Frau verschwunden ist ... "Die Chemie des Todes" besticht mit spannender Geschichte, authentischer Beschreibung forensischer Arbeit und starken Charakteren. Die Gold Edition enthält als Bonus zwei exklusive Interviews mit Autor Simon Beckett und Sprecher Johannes Steck.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
May 31, 2013
ISBN:
9783899647327
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor


Ähnlich wie Die Chemie des Todes

Ähnliche Hörbücher


Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Die Chemie des Todes denken

4.0
25 Bewertungen / 25 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    Dr David Hunter is consumed with the question of what happens to the soul after death. After all, he knows by the minute what happens to the body after death. Because he cannot answer this question he leaves his career as a forensic anthropologist and London, to become a G.P. in the rural town Manham. Here he wallows in his grieve at the death of his wife and his daughter. Only coming back to his forensic roots as a serial killer targets women in this small town. This is an excellent source of information of what forensic anthropology is. It is also a well-told tale of how this specialty works in the real world. Simon Beckett has created a character with flaws, desires, hopes, dreams. I am looking forward to reading more of Dr. Hunter.
  • (5/5)
    One of the best thrillers ever! This is Beckett's first book. It is about a serial killer who abducts women while they are alone in the forest. You get to follow one of those women and the situation she is in, is pretty horrible. This is one of those books that would make a perfect film.
  • (4/5)
    A fantastic, gripping read which keeps you guessing and doesn't disappoint on the gruesomeness nor the surprise. It is the kind of book you struggle to put down - the leading character is sympathetic and the village life is stifling. A highly recommended crime novel.
  • (4/5)
    A disturbingly graphic novel about a forensic anthropologist hiding from his past. But when strange killings happen in the village where's he's been working as a GP, he's forced to go back to help catch the murderer. Well written and chilling.
  • (4/5)
    Brilliant crime novel - although I kind of suspected who had 'done the deed' during the course of the book, I'm pretty sure I was led down that path, particularly by the clue that was found on the first body that David couldn't quite get a fix of in his mind. I found myself shouting what it as he needed to remember and what significance it might have. The ending was still slightly surprising and was a neat twist to the plot.This crime thriller was well written, and easily digested, and I will certainly read more of Beckett's books in the future.
  • (4/5)
    Gripping thriller with a surprising ending.
  • (4/5)
    Well written, with a slightly disappointing ending.
  • (4/5)
    I recently read Mr. Beckett's third book in this series, Whispers of the Dead, & enjoyed it enormously which inspired me to go back & grab the first two.The Chemistry of Death is the first in the series starring David Hunter, British forensic anthropologist. I love books with forensic detail & these are right up my alley.I love the fact that this book starts out with one of my favorite beginnings in literature: Our hero (or heroine), escaping from a tragedy & into a new life accepts a job in the British countryside, sells all of his/her belongings, & arrives by train in the distant village to begin their new life. Upon arrival said character is either picked up by odd retainer & whisked away to the scary manor or finds themselves walking for miles into town because they haven't arranged a ride. It's a start you'll read in Delderfield's To Serve Them All My Days & it's in my favorite Iris Murdoch novel, The Sea, The Sea. It's got that touch of the gothic novel with windswept moors & governesses & strange new beginnings that I can't help but love, even when the book itself isn't all that great or even all that gothic.In this novel, Beckett plays with the English village mystery in setting, in happenings, in stock characters, & in some plot details, but the form is morphed through a more modern forensic sensibility. It helps that Beckett writes clearly & well, plots well, & has a wonderful imagination. This was a thoroughly satisfying read.
  • (3/5)
    This book is about an English forensic scientist who becomes a country doctor after experiencing a personal tragedy. This is evidently the first in a series of books "starring" David Hunter and was a very enjoyable read. There is a lot of forensic detail and a fair amount about decomposition, so if you are squeamish, beware!!! There is a fair amount of misdirection, which is done fairly well. I would definitely check out another of his books.
  • (3/5)
    After a tragedy David Hunter has retreated from London and his job a one of the best forensic experts to work as a GP in the remote little town of Manham. He's buried his past until a grisly murder shocks the community. And when a second woman disappears, his expertise is needed. He becomes more and more involved in the investigation. On the other hand suspicion runs high, everybody suspects everybody else. The final showdown comes after many twists and turns. Simon Beckett had me on the edge of the seat and the denouement was really surprising.
  • (4/5)
    Retreating from his former life as a forensic anthropologist, Dr. David Hunter moves to live as a simpl G.P., in a small Norfolk village.
    After a few years building up a new life there, murder comes and he's pulled in, against his will, to help the police, just as his life was starting to pull itself together.
    It gets very tense as more bodies appear and the small community reacts with suspicion and hostility, as everyone tries to work out the identity of the kills and begins to strike out at randome.
    Tightly done, exciting story.
  • (5/5)
    My Review
    This book was a definite page-turner and a very twisty mystery. Every character was on my suspect list at one time or another and Simon Beckett kept me guessing all the way through. The book is very well-written and very entertaining especially as a group read with great discussion questions. I look forward to my next Simon Beckett novel.
  • (4/5)
    The Chemistry of Death of the first book in the Dr. David Hunter series. Hunter is a forensic expert who left his job in London after a tragedy forced him to make a change to his life. He's currently working in the small Norfolk village of Manham as a General Practitioner. While he can't stop dreaming of his dead family, he's as content as he can be under the circumstances. When the savagely mutilated body of Sally Palmer is found, Hunter knows he needs to help the police find the killer, despite his reluctance to return to his former profession. When another woman disappears, it becomes painfully clear that a serial killer is at work.

    I found this book quite gripping. It had a great story and the setting and characters were very realistic. The horrific details of what occurs to a decomposing body may not be for the faint of heart, but if you are a fan of Kathy Reichs and Patricia Cornwell you will really enjoy this book. I'm definitely planning to read the next in the series, Written in Bone.
  • (4/5)
    Former forensic anthropologist David Hunter is on the run from his old life, but when a dead body is found in the forest and it looks like a serial killer is on the loose, he's forced back into service, inadvertently placing his friends in danger. When I started reading this, it was late at night and I was planning on reading a few chapters. At around 2 am, I realized I was halfway through the book and really not wanting to stop. There is a lot of forensic information that I found particularly interesting, but even if it's not a special interest, the story is still absolutely captivating. The stakes are enormous and the mystery virtually impossible to guess due to all the twists and turns - can't wait to read the next installment in the series and can only hope it's as good as this one.
  • (4/5)
    This is an excellent book , very well written if you are in the mood for yet another story about the gruesome lethal practices of yet another serial killer of women.
  • (4/5)
    Dr. David Hunter, GP in a small English village. He's escaping from London after the death of his wife and daughter. Lots of closed minds and dull, unwelcoming bodies in town. Turns out that DH is a rare forensic anthropologist and helps the police by investigating the bugs on human remains. Good storyline, interesting all the way. DH is boring for the first 2/3 then becomes the hero and interesting. Will read other books in series. Very popular in Germany.
  • (2/5)
    I kept my hopes up until the end... but this was really formulaic. (That being said, *I* have not written or published a book.) Maybe it's the "first of a series" syndrome, but I have so many books to read not sure I'll reach for Written in Bone. Sorry.
    The real clincher? Over use of cliff-hanger sentences at the end of chapters. Seriously.
    "But it would not come to be."
    Gak.
  • (5/5)
    I have found a new forensic scientist to read - Dr. David Hunter. In this initial book of the series, in an attempt to escape his grief over the death of his wife and daughter, he becomes a general practitioner in a small town, helping with the practice of a doctor who was paralyzed from the waist down. Then there is a murder and the town becomes the site of a serial killer. While the police eliminate some obvious suspects, the true culprit is someone I never guessed and the reasons were simply evil. I will definitely read the next book in this series.
  • (4/5)
    A very enjoyable read. Just enough forensic detail to stop you from skipping past it - i find some books on the forensic theme waffle on a bit too much and you are waiting for them to get back to the story!! Well written and nice to have a Crime Thriller set in England. Plenty of twists and turns along the way. I would definately recommend this and look forward to reading some of his other books.
  • (3/5)
    READ IN DUTCH

    The Chemistry of Death. A Novel of Suspense - Simon Beckett

    I had already read Whispers of the Dead (David Hunter #3). Yeah, something about reading order? I know. After reading it, I decided I wanted to read more, and this seemed a very logical start...



    The Chemistry of Death is the first novel in the David Hunter series by Simon Beckett. It may not come as a surprise to learn there is quite a lot of death in this book and this series (What's in a name?). So, you'll need to have a stomach that can handle descriptions on decomposing bodies for the books (this one less than the third book, but just to be on the safe side).



    The story in this book I thought was OK, not really special, but it was nice reading. I'm still planning to read more books, like the second book, but I still need to go and find it.
  • (5/5)
    A real page turner of a story, gory but gripping. David Hunter flees to a remote Norfolk village to get over his wife & daughter's deaths as a locum GP and thinks he has turned his back on his previous forensic archaeology career, only to be called in to help with some gruesome local murders. Plot line keeps you guessing almost to the end.
  • (4/5)
    This was quite the page turner. I was really nervous about the outcome and ended up finishing it at 5 am! Too bad I needed to get up and go to work at 6! I love these Brit mysteries with appealing characters and lovely locations. I watch them on Netflix and read them as well.
  • (5/5)
    Dr. David Hunter is an expert in the chemistry of death. He knows the order of the organisms that invade a corpse: “Bacteria first, then insects. Flies. Eggs are laid, then hatch.” He can tell you that maggots always head south when they leave a body and that the grass they crawl through will die. In fact, that’s how the first body is discovered, when two boys walking through the woods notice the trail of maggots and follow it to the decomposing corpse of Sally Palmer, a writer living alone in her cottage in Manham, an isolated village in the Broads of Norfolk, England, where Hunter, the former forensic anthropologist, has come to heal after the deaths of his wife and daughter in a car accident. But now the officer in charge of the murder investigation needs Hunter’s expertise and so, reluctantly at first but with growing interest, Hunter finds himself once again drawn into the service of law enforcement as they track a vicious killer. And there are those in the village who wonder about Hunter himself. He is, after all, an outsider. And no one in Manham want to think the murderer could be one of their own.The Chemistry of Death is the first book in the British forensic science mystery series by Simon Beckett that features Dr. David Hunter. What makes this series so interesting is the way the author presents the scientific information related to the murder victims and how they died. Much of the information is quite graphic but fascinating to those who enjoy forensic detection. Beckett also is a master at keeping readers guessing as to the murderer right up until the end. And, a bit like the Norwegian writer Ann Holt, the suspense doesn’t necessarily stop at the end of the book. You never know who might still be out there.Other books in the series are Written in Bone, Whisters of the Dead, and The Calling of the Grave.
  • (4/5)
    “The Chemistry of Death” is a book that I picked up as a beach read in Mexico. It seemed as if it would be a light and quick read but the reality is that it wasn’t that light; however, it did read easily. It was a debut novel by Simon Beckett and the story of a forensic anthropologist and a serial killer. To escape the tragedy in his current life Dr. David Hunter goes moves to a remote Norfolk village to assist the local Doctor who is confined to a wheelchair and isn’t able to care for the citizens of the town. There is no other medical service for the villagers and the Doctor agrees to help for a short time. Young women begin to be murdered and there is no where to turn so the Doctor begins to investigate. It telling is suspenseful and unpredictable. The book has much scientific detail regarding the breakdown of the human body in death. I thought that the discussions of decay and insects and police investigation might be difficult to read, but it was quite interesting and the information actually enhanced the story. I would recommend this book to lovers of suspense and mystery or to those who are involved in the process of forensic investigations.
  • (4/5)
    Three years ago, David Hunter moved to rural Norfolk to escape his life in London, his gritty work in forensics, and a tragedy that nearly destroyed him. Working as a simple country doctor, seeing his lost wife and daughter only in his dreams, David struggles to remain uninvolved when the corpse of a woman is found in the woods, a macabre sign from her killer decorating her body. In one horrifying instant, the quiet summer countryside that had been David's refuge has turned malevolent—and suddenly there is no place to hide.

    The village of Manham is tight-knit, far from the beaten path. As a newcomer, Dr. Hunter is immediately a suspect. Once an expert in analyzing human remains, he reluctantly joins the police investigation—and when another woman disappears, it soon becomes personal. Because this time she is someone David knows, someone who has managed to penetrate the icy barrier around his heart. With a killer's bizarre and twisted methods screaming out to him, with a brooding countryside beset with suspicion, David can feel the darkness gathering around him. For as the clock ticks down on a young woman's life, David must follow a macabre trail of clues—all the way to its final, horrifying conclusion


    Cut above the usual formulaic ‘nasty, yet inventive, serial killer’ book. The writing is excellent (curiously old fashioned style I thought) and Dr David Hunter an appealing and believable lead with a fine supporting cast.
    The creepy atmosphere of the book was excellent especially around the village of Manham with its paranoid/hostile community which put me in mind of the film The Wicker Man. Good stuff