Genießen Sie diesen Titel jetzt und Millionen mehr, in einer kostenlosen Testversion

Kostenlos für 30 Tage, dann für $9.99/Monat. Jederzeit kündbar.

Dein Wille geschehe

Dein Wille geschehe

Geschrieben von Michael Robotham

Erzählt von Frank Arnold


Dein Wille geschehe

Geschrieben von Michael Robotham

Erzählt von Frank Arnold

Bewertungen:
4/5 (35 Bewertungen)
Länge:
7 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 14, 2013
ISBN:
9783899646139
Format:
Hörbuch

Beschreibung

Psychotherapeut Joe O'Loughlin soll der Polizei helfen, eine Frau davon abzuhalten, von der Autobahnbrücke zu springen. Doch die nur mit roten Highheels bekleidete Frau, die mit dem Handy zu telefonieren scheint, springt. Trieb der Anrufer sie in den Selbstmord? Kurz darauf wird die Geschäftspartnerin der Frau erfroren aufgefunden - nackt an einen Baum gekettet, mit einem Handy. Ein psychopathischer Serienkiller ist am Werk und hat bald auch Joe im Visier.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jun 14, 2013
ISBN:
9783899646139
Format:
Hörbuch

Über den Autor

Michael Robotham, autor ganador del prestigioso Gold Dagger, nació en Australia en 1960. En el año 2002 sorprendió al mundo entero con la publicación de su primera novela, Sospechoso, publicada en más de veinticuatro países. Desde entonces ha publicado once novelas y ha vendido más de veinte millones de ejemplares en todo el mundo.


Ähnlich wie Dein Wille geschehe

Ähnliche Hörbücher


Rezensionen

Was die anderen über Dein Wille geschehe denken

4.1
35 Bewertungen / 34 Rezensionen
Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?
Bewertung: 0 von 5 Sternen

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (3/5)
    I was sent this book as part of LT Early Reader’s Program, but I’m not sure why, since the first copyright date in the book in 2008.Nevertheless, here is my review.This is the first book by this author that I have read. Not sure if it will be the last or not. The protagonist is a psychologist with Parkinson’s disease who ends up in a test of wills with a sadistic sexual psychopath. Along the way several women are killed, his family is put in harm’s way, a police procedural plays out.I found the book alternatingly interesting and tedious, and I felt it could have done with a good bit of tighter editing. It goes to 465 pages in the edition I had, and it’s nearly half over before we really get to the meat of the mystery. There is a cover blurb from Stephen King stating, “The most suspenseful book I’ve read all year.” If this is true, Mr. King needs to do more reading. It never grabbed me in a way that made it impossible to put aside when it was time to go to sleep. A lot of loose ends are left hanging, also. For all the big deal that is made about the villain, we never learn the answers about what made him tick. Maybe it’s being saved for a sequel…he wasn’t killed.I'm giving it 3 stars. I didn't really dislike it, some might find it enjoyable. I probably would have set it aside had it not been for my obligation to LT.
  • (5/5)
    "It’s eleven o’clock in the morning, late September, and outside it’s raining so hard that cows are floating down rivers and birds are resting on their bloated bodies."Shatter hooked me from the first sentence (above) and didn't let go. A fast-paced, suspense-filled thriller. Highly recommended.
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed listening to this one but it really grinds my gears (shoutout to Peter Griffin) when a narrator makes two MAIN characters sound exactly the same. In this novel, both Joe and the killer sounded similar so I never quite knew who was talking until after a few sentences of dialogue.

    The story itself was interesting. I didn't know until after I was a few hours in that this is part of a series. I am interested to see what Joe has been up to before. I did not enjoy his relationship with his wife, but I'm not married, so what the hell do I know about whether it is realistic:-)

    I always enjoy listening to the riveting climaxes of crime fiction on audiobooks and this one really came through for me. I liked the mind games the killer played over the phone and I liked the twist about the wife/daughter dual-kidnapping. I felt dissatisfied with the ending but, overall, it was entertaining.
  • (5/5)
    Good Lord! This was a pulse pounding book. Michael Robotham, where have you been all my life? "Shatter" (thanks LibraryThing!) was my introduction to Michael Robotham. Now I will be tracking down all his previous books. Joe O'Loughlin is a wonderfully flawed psychologist/profiler who gets caught up in a suicide, which becomes a murder. He is also battling Parkinson disease, which adds a bittersweet layer to the story. Also add in a not so stable marriage, his retired cop best friend, and a female DI, who takes no prisoners and you've got yourself a read-all-day-all-night page turner. I couldn't put it down.
  • (4/5)
    This book was a very good psychological thriller. Although it was bordering on 500 pages, it moved quickly and was easy to read. The premise behind the book was interesting being what would make someone jump from a bridge who is afrad of heights? The psychology behind it was fascinating.Although it was an easy read, I did feel that the mystery behind the story could be solved very early in the book. With that said, it was still a good story that will keep you reading until the very end.Reader received a complimentary copy from the Library Thing Early Reviewers Program.
  • (4/5)
    Even though this book borders on being a chunkster (496 pages), it reads quickly and it's hard to put down once you're in it. Joe O'Loughlin has stopped seeing patients in his psychology service for the quieter life of an academic, lecturing at a university. His expertise, however, is renown, and when faced with a nude woman threatening to jump off a bridge, the police show up to take him to the scene to talk her out of committing suicide. She totally ignores him and seems to be listening to someone on her cell phone. Before he could connect with her, she jumps. Oh, well. He tried. Then the woman's daughter comes to him and convinces him that her fear of heights would make it impossible for her to kill herself that way. A second woman is found in the middle of a field, hooded, and shackled, dead from hypothermia. It now looks like there is a serious psycho out there. Joe has chosen to take his family out of London and to the country around Bath because he is suffering from Parkinson's. As the story is written in first person, we get an intimate look at how Parkinson's affects one's body. Stress increases the effects and Joe has to overcome a lot of stress.When I read a book written in the first person it seems to me that I am either listening to the person narrating his story or reading his written account. This story somehow made me think of the sections of a reality show where a contestant is explaining events to the audience. I understand that it allows the narrator to give us more details about his disease but it sometimes seemed forced.I am usually easily deceived by red herrings and miss clues in mysteries but I was always one or two steps ahead of the narrator here. This did not prevent me from flying through the story to see how it would resolve.
  • (5/5)
    Joe O'Loughlin, the unlikely protagonist in this page turner, is a professor of Behavioral Psychology who suffers from the early stages of Parkinson's Disease. O'Loughlin has moved his family to the English countryside in hopes of learning to cope with his disease and migrate away from his formerly hectic life in London. However, just as Joe is settling in to his new life, the police request his immediate assistance to help with a suicide attempt in progress. What follows is a murder investigation that matches O'Loughlin's wits against a trained military agent who uses psychology in a very different way. Robothan has pieced together a thrilling murder mystery that will keep you guessing until the very end. Highly recommended.
  • (4/5)
    Psychologist, husband, father, and Parkinson's sufferer Joseph O'Loughlin finds himself entirely unwittingly drawn into a complex suspense story when he's drafted to talk a jumper down from a bridge-- a jumper who seems to be being urged to jump. He finds himself against a foe who is sociopathic in the first place and made yet more maladjusted in circumstances that you will discover as you read-- a true psychological challenge who has thrown down the gaunlet and will stop at nothing to get his revenge for wrongs he perceives.Joe, we see immediately, is both mentally and physically vunerable, far from a hard-as-nails hero. His personal relationships are troubled; his health is bad. Though most of the novel is dialogue (and, as a consequence, reads fairly rapidly), these complications serve to form the inner musings and insecurities that make up the internal monologues of the novel. They're brief, but they're forceful, and out of them does rise some compelling, natural dialogue. Supporting cast members are well done. Ruiz is great and something of an enigma, just the sort of person you'd like on your side when it's time not to play by the rules any more. Young Darcy is complex and a particularly well-drawn teenage character, not a cookie-cutter stereotype at all-- kudos to Robotham for not taking the easy way out with "tramuatized teenage girl type A" and just filling in the blanks. Joe's wife is rather shadowy and difficult to pin down, which makes her character all the more intriguing. And though we know who our foe is fairly early on, it doesn't lessen the intensity of his compelling psychology or undercut the full force of his twisted nature, as will sometimes happen when the enemy is a known quantity. Even when the foe is revealed, he keeps revealing layers about himself: once exposed, he's not fully revealed, you might say.A few quibbles: I liked Ronnie a lot, but there is that stereotype of the tough lesbian cop to contend with. Joe's habit of referring to his disease as "Mr. Parkinson" wore a little thin. Joe's daughter's Charlie's evolution from a fairly naive young teenager to a pretty tough girl happened pretty rapidly: entirely believably, I'm not so sure.A final warning: If you're particularly sensitive to books in which children are placed in situations of great emotional or physical duress, you might want to give this one a skip, as it might be uncomfortable reading for you. It's slightly above the norm in that regard as far as thrillers/suspense writing go.
  • (5/5)
    Spine-tingling, edge of your seat thriller, keep turning the pages!How can someone have such an evil mind?! Who could do such a thing?!Every situation makes you want to help Joe solve these heinous crimes and bring justice to the families. Even at the possible cost of his own marriage, Joe cannot turn away and let others try to apprehend a mastermind who seems to be able to control women’s minds.
  • (3/5)
    A little bit disappointing. The story was fine but not as good as previous stories.
  • (4/5)
    Great mystery. Joe is a physiologist who has been drawn into a suicide. He thought that he was just going to enjoy his first day in his new teaching position. Instead he is called to a bridge where a naked woman is going to jump. As he is trying to talk her down he sees that she is talking on the phone. He swears that he hears someone to tell the woman to jump. Next thing he knows the dead woman's daughter is at his door swearing that her mother would never have committed suicide much less jump. She was scared of heights. Not only is Joe's marriage on the edge but so is his career. He has to prove that this woman was murdered with out loosing his family.
  • (4/5)
    I thought that this was a good book. When I found out I was getting it from the Library Thing Early Reviewers and saw it was the third book in a series I did go out and read the first 2 before I read this one. I really enjoyed the first 2 books and was a little disappointed with this one. It was an easy to read book but it just seems to have been missing something for me. If you do like a good mystery book I would recommend this series and I would start from book 1. I do plan on reading the 4th book in this series and I am hoping I will enjoy it as much as I enjoyed book 1 and 2.
  • (5/5)
    This is by far my favorite book in the Joe O'Loughlin series. This is the most suspenseful books in the series, and it kept my on the edge of my seat the whole time. This is one of the best, if not the best psychological thrillers that I have read.I was glad to see this book go back to concentrating on Joe instead of Ruiz. Before reading this book I still had hard feelings towards Ruiz but once I saw their friendship in this book my hard feelings went away. I think they have mostly just shifted to Julianne instead. She may blame Joe for what happened to their family, but she is not blameless.I loved this book and can't wait to read more of this series. I have grown quite attached to Joe and can't wait to see what he does next. I would recommend this book and the series to friends and family.*I received this book from a Librarything Early Reviewers giveaway which in no way affects the content of my review.*
  • (4/5)
    This is one of those thrillers/suspense novels that deserve the label -- from start to finish I simply couldn't put it down, to the detriment of everything else I was supposed to accomplish in the last 24 hours. Yes, it's formulaic in some ways -- will the flawed but heroic clinical psychologist Joe O'Loughlin catch the bad guy before he can destroy more lives? Will he figure out where he went wrong in time? But while you're reading, you don't really care that there are flaws -- some early clues tip us off to something that O'Loughlin misses a bit too blatantly -- and really are so immersed in the narrative that you don't care.When the book starts, O'Loughlin finds himself on the Clifton suspension bridge outside Bristol, charged with keeping a terrified, naked woman from jumping to her death. Oddly, she seems to be talking on a telephone, and pleading with someone -- and then she jumps. When her teenage daughter shows up on O'Loughlin's doorstep to insist his mother's fear of heights made it unlikely she'd ever commit suicide that way, Joe investigates, and finds his own suspicions mounting that something drove Christine to her death -- or rather, someone, someone particularly evil.Yes, the evildoer here is almost a caricature, but the plot is sufficiently complex, as is Joe's character, that it didn't bother me much. I just held on for the wild rollercoaster ride. I'd definitely recommend this to anyone who enjoys a thumping good read in the form of a suspense novel; 4.2 stars.
  • (4/5)
    I was enjoying this for the first two thirds, but then the combination of Julianne turning on Joe and the way his family got dragged into terrible danger was all too much for me. I think I'm done with this series.
  • (4/5)
    Psychological mysteries fascinate me. I’ve recently become a fan of the television show “Criminal Minds,” about the Behavioral Analysis Unit of the FBI, and have been ruing that I didn’t join the FBI when I got out of law school. I’m fascinated by what twists a mind to make it evil. Why do humans kill other humans to obtain what they could get by other, nonviolent, means? Is it fear, a background of abuse, or are some people simply born with a desire to kill? Why are there serial killers?Michael Robotham’s protagonist is a clinical psychologist named Joseph O’Loughlin who finds himself wrapped up in these questions. O’Loughlin suffers from Parkinson’s disease, and has recently given up his practice and become a part-time lecturer at a university in the West Country of England. Immediately following his inaugural lecture, he is summoned by the police to talk a woman off a bridge – a woman who is naked except for her red high-heeled shoes, and who is holding a cellphone to her ear as if her life depends upon it. O’Loughlin isn’t any help at all, and the woman plummets to her death.That ought to have been the end of it aside from feelings of regret and, perhaps, guilt, but O’Loughlin is soon convinced by the dead woman’s 16-year-old daughter that it wasn’t suicide, despite all the evidence to the contrary. His suspicions are confirmed, and he is able to get the police convinced, too, when another woman dies, naked but for good shoes, also apparently while on a cell phone – and she, too, has a child. O’Loughlin remains involved, despite his wife’s pleas that he leave things to the police. He talks to witnesses, investigates relevant sites, and generally makes something of a pest of himself – but he also makes progress.The progress is not without its price, however, and the price to his family is especially high. Robotham skillfully draws his characters so that it is their personalities that drive the plot as much or more than the crimes that O’Loughlin seeks to prevent. Indeed, the book seems to be as much about O’Loughlin’s marriage as it is about the crimes recounted, which adds much to its appeal.Shatter is at least 50 pages longer than it needs to be, as is the case with so many mysteries these days; it’s as if authors are afraid we won’t buy their books if they aren’t at least 400 pages long. Here, Robotham slows things down and adds incidents, description and interior monologue that all hurt the pacing and mitigate the tension he has created. But this is really a quibble, because the characters are interesting enough to make the reader want to spend time with them.Ultimately, Shatter is good enough that I intend to seek out Robotham’s other books, especially Suspect, which introduced Joseph O’Loughlin. And I really hope that Robotham will write another book featuring this character, because I want to know what happens to him next.
  • (5/5)
    Robotham is little known here, but absolutely first rate, both as a writer and as a crime writer. All of his books are deeply satisfying.
  • (4/5)
    This is the first book I read by Australian author Michael Robotham. Joseph O'Loughlin is a clinical psychologist who gets called to talk down a woman poised to jump from Clifton Suspension Bridge. He is unable to communicate with here as she seemed to focus on someone else speaking to her through a cell phone, and ends up jumping in front of his eyes. A few days later the victim's daughter shows up on Joe's doorstep, and voices her own doubts that her mother would never commit suicide.This enters Joe into a personal battle with the evil mind of a killer. The story is a fast-moving and terrifying thriller full of characters you can relate to. Joe himself is a broken and flawed; he suffers from Parkinson, and has no illusions about his powers of understanding the human mind. There are many interesting insights in the narrative that make it more than just a fiction thriller.Joe experiences a range of emotions that anyone can recognize, and dissects them in a very self-effacing way. He says he got involved into psychology in the first place to better understand the woman he loves, his wife Julianne, but he admits that she still remains largely a mystery to him. Joe also reflects on the variability of the human mind, the different ways people deal with pressure and grief. He makes very truthful observation about family, love and children. It is heartbreaking to note throughout the book that it is much easier to break a human mind than to heal it. The fractures of the human mind are mostly on the inside.The book is written from the first person perspective of both Joe the psychologist and the perpetrator, bringing in contrast their treatment of the human mind, and adds a chilling aspect to the novel.
  • (4/5)
    Joe O'Loughlin is a psycholigist who has moved from London to the suburbs of Bath with his family to please his wife by leaving police consulting behind. However, he can't help himself when the police enlist his help in helping a suicidal woman from jumping off a bridge. Needless to say, it's not a suicide but a stalker threatening to harm her daughter unless she does as her stalker instructs. Another woman apparently a victim of the same stalker dies and Joe gets pulled farther into the case against his wife's wishes. The unthinkable happens - Joe's daughter is kidnapped by the man and his marriage self-destructs while Joe plays cat-and-mouse games with the stalker.
  • (3/5)
    Endangered child. Maybe a little too suspenseful.
  • (5/5)
    Let me just say that if I could, I would give this book 6 stars! Fantastic thriller. I haven't read a thriller this good in a long long time. This author scares me with the way he thinks and his ability to write it. It was creepy, scary and funny at times with likable characters. I will definitely read more of his work. Someone said this book was predictable and I found it to be anything BUT predictable and I really like that in a book. I couldn't put it down. I will definitely recommend this book to anyone!
  • (5/5)
    Excellent thriller. Very dark! Sometimes seems that the next step is too obvious, but then the plot twists again and things don't happen quite the way you expect. Edge of the seat stuff!
  • (3/5)
    One afternoon Joe O’Loughlin, a clinical psychologist, is asked to help in a crisis situation: a naked woman is standing on a bridge preparing to jump to her death. Joe talks to her briefly but she jumps anyway. Several days later the woman’s teenage daughter, Darcy, appears on Joe’s doorstep and begs him to help her convince Police that her mother didn’t commit suicide. Joe begins to wonder if, somehow, the woman could have been coerced into jumping. He calls on his old friend, now-retired Detective Vincent Ruiz for some help and together they talk to the local police.

    Joe O’Loughlin has appeared in 3 books now although they can all be read as standalones. Each time I meet him I find something else to love. Unlike many of the protagonists in crime fiction Joe is not a troubled loner nor does he have any super human abilities. Even his skills in reading people, which he is mostly very good at, let him down some times. He’s smart, funny and heart-wrenchingly self aware. I particularly like the way Joe deals with the personal issues in his life in a very realistic way. He’s not always sensible (who is?) but nor does he go to the extremes that you see in some fiction that make you wonder how the person could possibly have survived adolescence.

    But the real joy of Joe is the way he interacts with the people around him: his family, his old friend Ruiz and, in this book, young Darcy and the DI in charge of the case, Veronica Cray. There’s always a dry, sarcastic wit to his relationships and it gives the book an undercurrent of humour which is a welcome relief among the dark subject matter. I think the natural-sounding dialogue that peppers the book is Robotham’s best writing and something that sets him apart from other authors.

    Now comes the heretical part of this review: I didn’t find Shatter particularly suspenseful. It was never much of a whodunnit (the culprit was revealed quite early on) nor, really, a why or a even a how dunnit (again all of those were revealed without fanfare and long before the end of the book). In the end it was what happens next story which, especially towards the end, was disappointingly predictable. Most of the story is told from Joe’s perspective but there are also short chapters told from the killer’s point of view and in them he talks about his capacity to break a person’s mind. Although the killer’s methods, described at some length which somehow made them less scary, led to extreme consequences I was never as gobsmackingly shocked as I was supposed to be by the notion that one person could manipulate another into doing something truly awful. I’ve read history, I watch the news and I’ve seen teenage girls in action. So, I never stepped over that line that separates me from knowing I’m in a fictional world to wondering if, maybe, that noise I heard outside the window isn’t evil that somehow leapt from the page.

    Perhaps I have suffered a little too much from the hype that has surrounded this book but it wasn’t the ‘wow’ read for me that others have described. The characters and dialogue are excellent, and well worth reading the book for, but, for me, the story wasn’t as engaging as Robotham’s two earlier books featuring Joe O’Loughlin (Suspect and Lost). I think it relied a little too heavily on one big, hairy, audacious plot point and because that didn’t quite work for me the rest was a little flat.
  • (4/5)
    This latest work of suspense from Michael Robotham does not disappoint. Joe O'Loughlin watches a woman jump to her death but as he learns more about her the more he thinks that she didn't jump voluntarily. Someone, somehow, made her jump. He becomes involved in the investigation and the search for the culprit, never realizing that his own family might be at risk...
  • (3/5)
    Terrific thriller and a refreshing change of pace. It did take me a few pages to get used to it being all-British. ie. talking about the boot of a car, and a parking lot is a car park, etc.. But the story was thrilling - - a woman walks naked to a bridge and jumps - - all the time on a cell phone. The lead character is a psychologist who is called in to help. Then another woman is found dead - similar circumstances. The suspect is someone who can hear when a person's mind breaks - - and he enjoys it.



    Exciting book - - all the way till the end.
  • (3/5)
    Joe O'Laughlin, psychologist, unwittingly becomes involved in a serial murders plot when he witnesses a women jump from a bridge to her death.I enjoyed the plot of this book which is very engaging and uses some technical savvy to solve the case. However, the miserable characters really distracted from the book. I'm not sure how O'Laughlin can carry a series, unless this is the last book with a debility disease such as Parkinsonism. It's really affecting his life. And, his wife is an unreasonable bitch. I'm not sure why Robotham has painted her this why, it seems out of character. This being said, the secondary characters seem real, quirky and enjoyable. I really liked the villian's persona and madness.
  • (3/5)
    Joe O'Loughlin is a psychologist afflicted with Parkinson's.The police ask his help to attempt to disuade a potential suicide from killing herself. He arrives at a bridge where she's considering jumping from. He attempts to disuade her. She says "You don't understand" and jumps.Being a decent person, Joe is having trouble that he couldn't save her. A bit later, a 16 year old comes to his home. Darcy Wheeler tells him that it was her mom, Christine, and that she'd never commit suicide in that manner. She was afraid of heights. Would he look into her death.He talks to Cynthia's business partner, Sylvia Furness but nothing comes of it.Nothing seems to work until he calls his friend, Vincent Ruiz, a currently retired police investigator. Together they retrace Christine's steps and find a note "Help me" With this the police change their investigation to murder.Then, Sylvia Furness' body is found also without her clothes. We relive her plight where the killer called her and claimed that he had her daughter and would rape her unless Sylvia would take her place and agree to his demands.With this death, lead investigator, DI Veronica Cray asks Joe's help in finding and stopping the killer.The reader is made aware that the killer is Gideon Tylor a former intelligence officer who was in Afghanistan and had been an interrogator. Gideon is searching for his wife and daughter and taking out his hatred on his wife's friends.This was an enjoyable read. The protagonist is a down to the earth person who wants to help and he has his faults and frailties i.e. his Parkinson's disease. Darcy Wheeler was also an interesting character and I hope to read about her again in future novels by Robotham.This novel was nominated for the 2009 Ian Fleming Steel Dagger Award and CWA Library Dagger.
  • (3/5)
    Clever set up but rather too gleefully creepy and misogynistic, and the villain is not as intriguing as he should be. The Parkinson's-afflicted main character and his sidekicks are great characters, though.
  • (5/5)
    Robotham’s latest thriller brings back his original protagonist from ‘Suspect’, psychologist Joe O’Laughlin. In this book Joe is battling a psychopath, a grief-stricken teenage girl, Parkinson’s disease, and doubts about his wife’s fidelity. He’s now a part-time professor at the University, spending the rest of his time as a stay-at-home dad to his two young daughters. Joe is asked by the police to talk with a woman threatening to jump from the Clifton Suspension Bridge. When he arrives he finds Christine Wheeler naked, with SLUT written on her stomach and a cell phone to her ear. When he tries talking to her, she whispers, “You don’t understand…” and jumps to her death. It seems to be a clear case of suicide, until Christine’s teenage daughter Darcy shows up on Joe’s doorstep and insists that her mother was afraid of heights and would never have committed suicide in that manner. At the request of the grieving girl, Joe starts investigating and gets help from his friend Vincent Ruiz, now retired from the police force. When a friend of Christine’s is also found dead of an apparent suicide, the police are forced to open an investigation and consider Joe’s conviction that the women were being manipulated. Joe is a compassionate character who is easy to like, because he always tries to do the right thing. He genuinely cares about others and wants to help them. But he also has to answer to his wife’s fears that his involvement with the case will bring danger to their own family. This book was absolutely riveting, the type that grabs hold of your attention and doesn’t let it go until the last page is turned.
  • (4/5)
    Very good psychological twist and good choice of lead character with Parkinson's. I really loved 90% of this book until certain predictable things happened.