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Taking Back Retail: Transforming Traditional Retailers Into Digital Retailers

Taking Back Retail: Transforming Traditional Retailers Into Digital Retailers

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Taking Back Retail: Transforming Traditional Retailers Into Digital Retailers

Länge:
128 Seiten
1 Stunde
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jul 1, 2013
ISBN:
9780987555618
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Retail is thriving for a new breed of fashion retailer—the kind that exists exclusively online.
Taking Back Retail focuses on ways that traditional retailers can reclaim the ground they have lost to e-commerce over the past decade. It’s about understanding the mindset of online retailing, whilst discovering the right tools to set your brand in motion. Exploring everything from online video to Facebook commerce, it is a comprehensive guide to taking any brand online.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Jul 1, 2013
ISBN:
9780987555618
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor


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Buchvorschau

Taking Back Retail - Andrew Apostola

© Portable Australia Pty Ltd 2013

ISBN-13: 978-0-9875556-1-8

First published and printed in Australia by Portable in 2013 www.portablestudios.com.au \ www.portable.tv

Written by

Andrew Apostola and Simon Goodrich

Editor

Fiona Killackey

Editorial Coordination and Production

Roseanne Tiziani

Design

Motherbird

Portable acknowledges the generous assistance and support of the Council of Textile and Fashion Industries of Australia in the creation of this book, and the cover images and print contributions of Arnsdorf and Gail Sorronda.

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any other means, electronic, electrostatic, magnetic tape, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission in writing of the respective copyright holders.

Full details of the Cataloguing-In-Publication entry are available from the National Library of Australia.

About the Authors

Andrew Apostola and Simon Goodrich are the co-founders of Portable, a digital agency and creative studio with offices in New York, Sydney and Melbourne. Over the past decade they have worked with hundreds of brands across fashion, film, music, design and retail to create award-winning digital and interactive experiences. They are judges for the International Academy for Digital Arts and Sciences (IADAS) and are active leaders in international fashion, technology and design communities, as well as being the co-creators of Svbscription, a luxury subscription service.

Contents

Foreword

by Jo-Ann Kellock, Council of Textile and Fashion Industries of Australia

Introduction

Chapter 1: Creating An Online Retail Experience

1.1 Making a Modern Retailer

1.2 Defining a Digital Strategy

1.3 Tackling Technology

1.4Creating a Content Strategy

Chapter 2: Social Media & The Fashion Video

2.1 The Importance of Being Social

2.2 Specifying a Social Media Strategy

2.3 Shooting to Succeed: The Role of Fashion Video

2.4 Conceiving a Fashion Video

2.5 Creating a Fashion Video

2.6 Distributing a Fashion Video

Chapter 3: Managing & Growing An Online Store

3.1 Embracing E-Commerce

3.2 Marketing a Brand Online

3.3 Selling & Distributing

3.4 Analysis: Making Metrics Mean Something

3.5 Finding the Right Person for the Job

Conclusion

Glossary & Resources

Foreword

Within the next decade digital channels are expected to represent half of all fashion purchases. While the West still provides the biggest spenders, US$1,000+ per capita, Asia Pacific countries are moving further out in front with over 5% growth per annum in apparel retail sales. Enormous opportunities await those that can navigate the channels to access these markets.

Over the last five years, we have witnessed an explosion in omni-channels and watched as fashion brands grapple with selecting what's right for them and when to make the call. Brands are now competing in a customer-centric, experience-driven market focused on informing, educating and entertaining where product is distributed through many channels and marketing relies on video, augmented reality and other rich media.

Taking Back Retail is timely and relevant because it provides readers with real solutions and a roadmap for navigating the complexities of the digital world. It evaluates online tools that are low cost and easily accessible. This is the first edition of its kind, which outlines case studies that relate to fashion with currency for both large and small business.

As peak body for the fashion sector TFIA are delighted to support Portable, who once again are leading with an important initiative. We recommend it to all brand and boutique owners as well as educators and policy advisors, and anyone else who has an interest in developing a successful fashion brand.

Jo-Ann Kellock /CEO, Council of Textile and Fashion Industries of Australia

Introduction

Retail isn't dead. In fact, you could say that during the last five years we have experienced a renaissance in the retail sector, punctuated by innovations all the way up the production line and into areas once considered unimaginative, such as merchandising, logistics, customer service, and relationship management.

Retail is no longer one-dimensional. Over the past decade, layers have been added to the retail experience, creating a new breed of retailer. The first example of these was the introduction of the brand website. Next came e-commerce and online sales. The emergence of Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and YouTube has added to the retail experience and redefined the term visual merchandising. The brand website is no longer the only interface between companies and their customers. Surprisingly, those who are excelling in this new arena may have never even stepped foot into a high street boutique, let alone operated a cash register.

What is clear is that retail is thriving for a new breed of fashion retailer—the kind that exists exclusively online. While the prompt demise of early online evangelists such as Boo. com exposed major issues with online retailing, it paved the way for the next generation of online retailers to set up shop, learning from the failings of those early pioneers. By the time Natalie Massenet launched women's retailer Net-a-Porter in 2000, retail consumers were ready to invest their trust (and money) into online stores and the brands behind them. Technology and consumer trust continued to grow in parallel. The modularisation of e-commerce tools and platforms; the interConnectivity between logistics providers and technical back-end; the rise of search, then video, then social; all of these factors have made it easier for online retailers and customers to interact in a way they never have before.

The modern retailer understands that the entire fashion ecosystem has changed. Prior to the internet, fashion marketers relied on a stable set of tools and channels to reach consumers. Under the old paradigm, a fashion designer would work to produce a collection, create relevant images and campaign material surrounding that collection and then hand it over to publicists or a marketing agent to build awareness. These middlemen would manage the promotion of each range using standard channels, such as direct marketing, print advertising, editorial, radio, television and affiliate promotions. Publicists and marketers were able to build relationships with relevant media to ensure that their client's collections could reach the public in a timely and seamless manner. Retailers would buy collections based on their own ability—but mainly the media's— to attract customers to a range. The new digital economy has ameliorated this process, creating an environment that leaves the traditional retailer with the least amount of tools to compete.

If you're contemplating your first foray into online retail, or if you've been online for three years but haven't seen the returns you hoped for, you're probably questioning whether it's worth going forward. Is going up against this new breed of retailer going to change anything? The short answer is yes. It will. Swiftly adopting change has its advantages and these advantages can be particularly pronounced when it comes to online. Staking your claim early means that you can start building trust with your existing customers who are also making the transition from being purely retail consumers into confident digital consumers. If you already have the connection physically from them coming into your store then they are more likely to trust you when they first make that switch in behaviour. Having a presence online allows you to build trust with search engines such as Google, which can be a key factor in growing your business and attracting potential customers—particularly those who have never experienced your brand before. But if you are a traditional retailer not yet fully entrenched in e-commerce, you do have the luxury of being able to learn from the many mistakes being made online today.

Taking Back Retail focuses on ways that traditional retailers can reclaim the ground they have lost to e-commerce over the past decade. It's about understanding the mindset of online retailing, while discovering the right tools to set your brand in motion. While many have achieved incredible growth, a considerable number have floundered due to poor choices surrounding technology, marketing and the allocation of resources, which is the result of a lack of

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