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The Graveyard Book

The Graveyard Book

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The Graveyard Book

Bewertungen:
4/5 (10,736 Bewertungen)
Länge:
277 Seiten
4 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Oct 6, 2009
ISBN:
9780061972652
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

From Scribd: About the Book

Nobody Owens, known as Bod to his friends, is a normal boy. There isn't much to set him apart from other boys, except for the fact that after the grisly murder of his entire family he wandered into a graveyard as a toddler; the ghosts and other supernatural beings in the graveyard agreed to raise him as one of their own, despite his corporeal nature. Aside from the graveyard raising, particularly at the direction of a solitary guardian who belongs to neither the world of the dead or the living, Nobody Owens has a completely normal life.

The graveyard is filled with dangers, of course, but also full of adventure that any young child can easily find. But as time passes and the outerworld seems to call his name, can Nobody Owens safely leave the haven of the graveyard that has always been his world? Will he come under attack from the man, Jack, the very same who murdered the rest of Nobody's family?

Renowned and loved storyteller Neil Gaiman returns to the literary scene with this magical novel for his dedicated audience who so wholeheartedly embraced his New York Times bestselling story Coraline.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Oct 6, 2009
ISBN:
9780061972652
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Neil Gaiman is a #1 New York Times bestselling author of books for children and adults whose award-winning titles include Norse Mythology, American Gods, The Graveyard Book, Good Omens (with Terry Pratchett), Coraline, and The Sandman graphic novels. Neil Gaiman is a Goodwill Ambassador for UNHCR and Professor in the Arts at Bard College.



Rezensionen

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3.9
10736 Bewertungen / 620 Rezensionen
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Kritische Rezensionen

  • A stellar book, and it seems like Gaiman intends to keep setting the bar higher and higher for himself, with every different book of his my expectations just keep climbing up and up. I loved The Graveyard Book. It is a modernized (if you can call a graveyard modernized?) retelling of The Jungle Book, relating to the same "lost child raised by X" formula. The main difference being that Nobody Owens' family isn't lost in an accident, they are brutally murdered. Oh, and Nobody is raised by vampires and ghosts, which I think is a bit different than wolves and gorillas. At the end of this book I found myself wishing there were more pages, because the story pulled me in deep and I did not want to get out of it. The world that Gaiman creates for this story is vivid and tangible, and I loved every moment I spent in it.

    Scribd Editors
  • In typical Gaiman style, when you begin reading The Graveyard Book you are pretty quickly launched into a world so delicately and masterfully created that you will have not even notice when you are no longer reading a book, but instead sitting in a graveyard next to Bod. As the book begins with a triple homicide and the near escape of a toddler, if you can call fleeing to a graveyard an escape, it sets the mood quickly, but then taps the brakes a few times to let readers catch up. We get to enjoy some time with Bod, his graveyard extended family, and see him experience happiness for different reasons than your typical boy. Yes, he seeks adventure, and he eventually starts to feel a bit trapped by the constraints of the graveyard, a place none of his adopted family can easily leave, but Bod can...will he?

    Scribd Editors

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (4/5)
    The premise: ganked from BN.com: Nobody Owens, known to his friends as Bod, is a normal boy. He would be completely normal if he didn't live in a sprawling graveyard, being raised and educated by ghosts, with a solitary guardian who belongs to neither the world of the living nor of the dead. There are dangers and adventures in the graveyard for a boy. But if Bod leaves the graveyard, then he will come under attack from the man Jack--who has already killed Bod's family . . . My RatingBuy the Paperback: but it's close to "Give It Away." Don't get me wrong, I enjoyed this well enough: it's a fast read with some delightful moments and lovely language, but a closer inspection of the plot made me batty. I'm glad I found it on the used bookshelf for only $8.99. :) The art's nice too (but then again, I do love Dave McKean), but I wish there'd been more of it. A predictable story in its own way, so if you're a Gaiman newbie, I don't suggest starting here. Go for his other Hugo winner: American Gods. Now that is a book to sink your teeth into, and to be honest, I'm kind of wanting to read it again. The Graveyard Book is fun enough, but I don't see myself coming back to it, unless I have a kid one day and we read it together. Which, for the record, would be lots of fun, even though the beginning is quite dark. :)Review style: I'm going to verge into spoiler territory this time, because part of what I want to talk about are the bigger questions the plot raises but doesn't resolve. Don't worry, I'm not going to spoil the ending directly, but there's some logic questions I want to bring up that I hope closer readers of this book can answer. Also, I'll talk about the comparison to Kipling's The Jungle Book (which I've never read), and discuss the book's target audience (here's a hint, it's not YA!). If you're worried about the plot questions/spoilers I raise, skip to "My Rating" at the end of the review, where I talk about whether or not this is a good title for Gaiman newbies to start with.The full review may be found in my LJ, if you're interested. As always, comments and discussion are most welcome. :)REVIEW: Neil Gaiman's THE GRAVEYARD BOOKHappy Reading!
  • (4/5)
    A young boy grows up in a graveyard, surrounded by spirits and ghouls.I love me some good children's lit, and I love me some Neil Gaiman even more. Put the two together, and I'm a happy girl indeed.THE GRAVEYARD BOOK is a creepier take on THE JUNGLE BOOK, but you don't need to have read Kipling's classic to enjoy Gaiman's version. It's a wonderful little book that reads like a collection of interconnected short stories. Bod ages at least a year between chapters, and one - "The Witch's Headstone" - was in fact published as a short story a couple of years before the novel was released. His adventures are episodic, but there's a definite sense of growth and change running beneath the narrative. Gaiman shows us how Bod matures as the story unfolds, and we see how his potential for change sometimes puts him at odds with his ghostly friends. There's a lot of flashy surface stuff here, but there's also a deeper thread that parents and educators are bound to appreciate.Be aware, though, that it is a darker story. Gaiman writes horror, and he doesn't pull many punches even when his books are for younger readers. The book begins with a murder, and many of the ghosts died unpleasant deaths. Bod's adventures are scary as well as fun. Religious families may also take issue with the fact that the graveyard seems to be the final destination for most folks.I'd certainly recommend this, though. It's an entertaining read with a lot of heart, and the more I think about it, the more I like it. I'd love to read more about Bod, but I don't imagine there'll ever be a sequel to this. I suspect that the anticipatory feeling the reader gets as she finishes may be part of the point.(A slightly different version of this review originally appeared on my blog, Stella Matutina).
  • (4/5)
    Nobody Owens. Bod for short. He lives in a graveyard and communicates with dead people and . . . the not so dead. Other than that - he's a normal boy. Bod's unfortunate circumstances do not allow him to leave the graveyard. If he does, he could be killed by the man Jack that murdered his family and has been hunting for him ever since. Other than that - he's a happy boy.Well, I'll be. I actually really enjoyed this book - a Gaiman book - a fantasy book. Who would have thought!?! I have gone from a rating of 2/5 (Anansi Boys) to a 3/5 (Coraline) to a 4/5 with The Graveyard Book. Woo Hoo!The idea that real life is reflected in this fantasy book is fascinating and interesting to discover along the way. There were some things or scenes that I didn't care for (a little too out-there for me), but for the most part I enjoyed the adventure, the relationships and most of all, the suspense. This is definitely a book that can be enjoyed by many ages - probably best read by adults to the younger ones, as it is recommended for 9 - 12. (4/5)Originally posted on: "Thoughts of Joy..."
  • (4/5)
    I read this with my book club, so for my review, I’ll share some of our observations. Many of us, myself included, enjoyed the references to popular mythology, although some people didn’t notice all of them. I think we all generally felt that the book read like a bunch of short stories which had been pasted together but were a bit disjointed and the ending was quite abrupt. On the other hand, we all loved the writing and drawings, both of which I thought worked well together to capture the emotion of different scenes. Like in Gaiman’s talk, I felt as though every word was carefully chosen. I was struck by the creepiness of these scenes he described, but even that was overshadowed by the beauty of the writing. This was a very cool, unique middle grade book.

    This review first published on Doing Dewey.
  • (5/5)
    Review from BadelyngeAlthough I adore Neil Gaiman's comic book work like his wonderful Sandman magnum opus, I have never really enjoyed any of his novels. His adult novels like American Gods failed to interest me and his books more aimed at younger readers never quite hit the right mark. Stardust attempts to to tell a tale in fairy tale style but is far too long for that style to engage. Basically I think he wrote a novel using a style more suited to the short form. He has great ideas, a wonderful imagination and a wide eclectic grab-bag of interests and knowledge to draw upon. Neverwhere was an explosion of concepts, wordplays and atmosphere but too much jumble at once and always preempted by the tv series and undermined by rewrites to suit other audiences.The Graveyard Book is for me his first hit, yes, a very palpable hit. Escaping from the man Jack (a very Gaimaneske assassin) who murders his family in their beds, a young toddler escapes to the strange safety of a nearby graveyard. He's adopted by the local ghosts and named Nobody - or Bod for short. Each chapter is pretty self contained as Bod grows up and learns about the different characters that inhabit his new world. Perfect for reading a chapter a night for the kids. And there are some really fine characters; the vampirish Silas, Miss Lupescu, Scarlett and my favourite, the capricious ghost witch Liza Hempstock. It's a simply written, pleasurable, charming and surprisingly emotional read. My copy was illustrated by the excellent off kilter line drawings of Chris Riddell.
  • (5/5)
    What can I say - I love Neil Gaiman's books! I laughed, cried and had a lot of other emotions in between as I went through this book. Ghosts, vampires and werewolves have never been more endearing...
  • (5/5)
    This book is gorgeous. Wonderful. Stupendous. I'm not sure how many other words I can come up with to describe it, but the fact remains that it was one of the best stories I've had the pleasure to dive into this year. To those of you who might not have read Neil Gaiman's work before, it is always very layered. Enjoyable at any age, but the older you are the more you can see the hidden story line beneath everything else. This story is no different. The Graveyard Book is a story about humanity, friendship, and the age old battle of growing up.

    Nobody Owens (Bod for short), looses his family in a grisly murder. Sad, I know. However what happens next is magic. Taken in by the inhabitants of the graveyard that he wanders into, Bod soon learns so much more than he ever imagined. I loved the way that Gaiman shows Bod's different stages of life. At a young age, Bod is smart and curious. As he grows, his questions turn from simple curiosity, to actual life lessons that he is trying to learn. Each of the graveyard members is unique and vibrant. From long dead war heroes, to simple folk who keep to themselves, the graveyard is a bustling place for a young boy to grow up.

    What will really draw you into The Graveyard Book though is the writing. Neil Gaiman's writing is one of the reasons I fell in love with his books in the first place. Every page is filled with gorgeous prose, vivid descriptions, and witty observations. Bod's story, in particular, has a lovely mix of mischief, magic and horror. There were portions of this book that had me shivering in my boots. Well, shoes. Anyhow, it is really the ability to get so wholly lost in this story that really makes it a great read. You'll find yourself in the graveyard, and chances are you won't want to leave.

    I'm not sure how else to implore you to read this book. The writing, the characters, the whole entire vibe is just pure ambrosia. There are moments that will break your heart, and others that will startle you with their sudden appearance. Whether this is your first foray into Gaiman's brilliantly woven worlds, or you're an avid fan, this is a book that is sure to delight.
  • (3/5)
    Better late than never! This won the Newbery in 2009 and it's just as good now. It's got enough "creep" to make a child shiver and giggle without giving him or her nightmares. As usual, Gaiman is a creative, imaginative writer who always seems to get it right. Meet "Bod" (short for Nobody Owens) who is being "raised by the dead" (get it?) in a graveyard to keep him safe from the man who murdered his entire family when he was a baby.
  • (4/5)
    Reread this book and wrote a lot of Battle of the Books Questions for the 2013 teams. I liked it much btter this time.
  • (5/5)
    Nobody Owens, Bod to those who do know him. A boy who is raised in a graveyard by the ghosts who live there over the last hundreds of years. Protected from those who brutally murdered his Mother, Father and sister, but missed him.He is granted Freedom of the Graveyard, which means he has the ability to pass through solid objects within the graveyard. He is taught the ways of the spirits and also learns what life was like in the eras the spirits were still living humans.Silas is Bod's appointed caretaker. Mr. and Mrs. Owens are his foster parents. They never had a child while alive, so this is their chance. It is Mrs. Owens that gives Bod his name, as she remarks that "He looks like nobody except himself."The chapters are spaced apart, sort of telling of different periods of time from when he arrived at the graveyard as just a toddler until he became 15. He has no real memories of his parents or the murder. A murder that seemed to have been ignored and never solved, for some strange reason.He makes friends with a little girl named Scarlett, when he is quite young. He never shows himself to her parents so they convince Scarlett he is just an imaginary friend. They soon move away and once again he only has the ghosts of the graveyard for company.The graveyard is very old and about 40 years before Bod arrived, it was declared a natural reserve and not very often visited. This makes it that much easier for Bod to live there. Silas, his caretaker, has the ability to go to the village to get supplies for Bod, so that is taken care of. The spirits teach him from what they know; reading, sums and a little history. He does try attending school with regular children, but it doesn't work out due to bullies.He does have adventures and makes friends that are unusual, such as Miss Lupescu, a Hound of God; Elizabeth Hempstock who was executed for being a witch. He learns supernatural abilities such as Fading or turning invisible, Haunting, Dream Walking and more. Some of these abilities come in handy.I took time to read this as it seemed to be a book written to be read that way. Yes there is excitement and Bod does find out about what happened to his family. He also finds that there is much to experience outside of the graveyard and that he can't live there forever.Interesting side note: I have some quotes about writing that pop-up on my computer. The author is the same author of this book. I'd never read Neil Gaiman before. Very enjoyable!
  • (4/5)
    An odd and lovely and dark fantasy about a boy raised in a graveyard by ghosts and a mysterious guardian after a villain murders his family. Gaiman reads it well also.
  • (3/5)
    I really wanted to love this book, after loving Good Omens.There was an interesting plot device. It was an interesting story but, overall, I take issue when an author creates magical or spiritual beings and subscribes them abilities that bring impossible resolution to the issue at hand.
  • (5/5)
    One of my best memories of 2008, was traveling to Comic Con in NY and having a chance to hear Neil Gaiman read from this book for hours. I was so excited when it won the Newbery!
  • (4/5)
    Even if you own and have read this novel for yourself you should look up the audio-book and listen to it read by the author who reads beautifully.
  • (5/5)
    I didn't know what to expect from this book but have to admit I really enjoyed it, although it is quite different fayre to the books I usually read. I wouldn't have read this but for the Librarything Mystery and Suspense Extra Group Monthly Sub-genre Challenge, which is the beauty of these challenges. I think it was very cleverly written and can be enjoyed by both adults and children. It almost needs a sequel to find out what happened next! I do look forward to reading more books by Neil Gaiman in the future.
  • (5/5)
    Nobody Owens is raised in a cemetary after his family is murdered. He was supposed to die that night but wandered away before the murderer caught him. He is safe as long as he stays in the cemetary. He can see the spirits of the graveyard's inhabitants. He learns from them on the physical as well as spiritual side of life. He grows. He gets into trouble. He needs Silas and the rest of the spirits and guardians of the graveyard. I enjoyed this book. It is my favorite Neil Gaiman book so far. I loved the characters and the story. It was fun and different from much of my reading. If I owned this book, it would be a keeper.
  • (4/5)
    My first encounter with Neil Gaiman was several years ago in his Sandman graphic novel series... I started the first one, got too scared and had to put it down. Last year I was reintroduced to his work The Ocean at the End of the Lane in a book club and could not put it down. I heard that The Graveyard Book had a similar tone, so I got it from the library. And it's true!I didn't want this book to end. It's telling is sweet and sad and a little bit dark. It reminded me a little of Grimm's Fairy Tales in its nonchalant approach to murder. Though I didn't find it as compelling the whole way through as The Ocean (I think because it is a children's/tween aged book and I'm 35) but I really enjoyed the read. The characters are explored beautifully and plot is developed thoughtfully, the story is believable while still being obviously fantastical.I read this book for this years book bingo square entitled "a retelling of a classic" because the story is intended to pay homage to Rudyard Kipling's "The Jungle Book". It truly is a coming of age tale, and like Mowgli struggles between the wild and the tame, Bod struggles with his 'gift' of straddling the border between the living and the dead. The reason is very similar, I think, in the living and the tame both lack the wisdom of surrender inherent to the wild and the dead. The depth of this perspective is vital to true happiness in life and bares repeating over and over. I hope the generations exposed to The Graveyard Book gain wisdom from this book and are enticed to read the Jungle Book over again as adults.I'm giving this book four stars because while it opened my mind and deepened my sense of living life, I don't know that I would read it over. I would definitely recommend it to others though!
  • (5/5)
    loved it! best to read in one sitting where you never have to leave his world and characters.
  • (4/5)
    This book was fantastic. From the moment I was introduced to Nobody 'Bod' Owens I wanted to keep reading. Gaiman's story about the young boy raised in a graveyard after the murder of his family is sad, entertaining, and a fun read.
  • (5/5)
    Rating: 5 of 5My 30-year old sister and 11-year old niece both read this and told me I *had* to read it. Thus I checked it out from the library, not expecting it to blow my mind. Honestly, books like this are why I read. It has everything one could hope for: humor, the creepies, a love story; and yes, I cried. It did for graveyards what James and the Giant Peach did for fruit and insects :D The Graveyard Book is on my 2011 x-mas list.Review of the hardcover edition, which I borrowed from the library. I bought the paperback in December 2011.
  • (4/5)
    This applies to the audio version. I enjoyed listening to this. Neil Gaiman read it and I enjoyed his narration. He didn't over play it, try to act things out or over emote, but wasn't dull either - just like having someone who reads well read you a story.
  • (4/5)
    Nice book, than can be read by people of any age.
    It would probably get a bigger rating, but I liked first half much better than the second. I was not surprised when I read in 'Authors Note' at the end of the book that he wrote the second half a long time ago and then later added the first couple of chapters.
  • (4/5)
    I got The Graveyard Book for Christmas, yesterday, and devoured it in a single day despite also reading other stuff, watching movies, going shopping, seeing friends and all those things you do when you're home for Christmas. It's lovely. I like some of Neil's other books, like Neverwhere and American Gods, better, but at the same time this one has its attractions. It feels more... bite-size. Easily digestible.

    I haven't actually read The Jungle Book, so I can't make comparisons with that original inspiration, but I do love the idea of this: a boy gets raised, in a graveyard, by ghosts. In some ways, I wish there'd been less Bod and more Silas, but on the other hand it was quite nice to feel that there was a whole world of stories there and we got glimpses into many of them. I liked the episodic sort of form; I wish there'd been more episodes, though. I also liked that although we are given many, many hints about Silas, the word "vampire" is not used once.

    The strength of this book for me was the voices. The narrative voice included. The dry little comments about Silas, the parenthetical dates of births and deaths... it all added up to make me smile often and giggle a few times. Silas' character was lovely, and the glimpse we got into his feelings in the last chapter was fascinating. The Owenses were good, I could virtually hear their voices as I read their lines -- helped, of course, by having listened to the recordings of Neil Gaiman reading this aloud.

    Not my favourite book in the whole wide world, but nonetheless a keeper, something easy and smooth for when I'm not feeling up to a mammoth undertaking.
  • (5/5)
    No matter what genre you prefer, try out a Gaiman book. I swear, he crosses all boundaries with his writing.

    He's magical, lyrical, beautiful. He's the modern version of Lewis Carroll, J.M. Barrie or Rudyard Kipling -- possessed of the same otherwordly, all-engrossing qualities of literary talent. To say his works transport you to another world isn't quite adequate -- they take you to that place between sleep and awake, the fever-dream you can never quite describe.

    This particular book, despite the grim-sounding title and macabre-seeming premise is simply another great example of Gaiman's inimitable talent. Highly recommended for anyone who reads. At all. Ever.
  • (4/5)
    A complex, beautifully written, generally very fun read. Also, how many novels have Tori Amos lyrics and endorsements from Diana Wynne Jones?

    The early chapters were a bit patchy, at least reading them the first time through; they felt episodic and a little predictable. In general, while the language, characters, and themes were written to appeal to any age, many of the plot twists, however well executed, would only be surprising to children. Didn't bother me, I'm just surprised that the novel is being so heavily cross-advertised to adults, at least on this side of the pond. (The library ordered two copies, one for adults, one JF but put in the teen section!)

    Silas is AWESOME.

    If the last chapter doesn't make you teary-eyed, you are probably broken and there is no hope for you.

    Good book, will reread!
  • (5/5)
    I just sat down and read this in a day (sorry, store customers, surely you were happy finding your own books).

    Makes me think there should be a category for books set in graveyards. The other one, of course is Beagle's Fine and Private Place. Oh, and of course the Spoon River Anthology.

    Satisfying, shivery, beautiful, and open ended...sort of like life.
  • (4/5)
    I absolutely adored this book.

    It's the story of a young boy and his growing up... in a graveyard. There are several vignettes told through his life, and they all connect at the end. I love the use of the man Jacks.

    I love Gaiman's story telling, and always, his voice acting for the audiobook is just awesome.

    If I had a kid, this would definitely be on its bookshelf.
  • (3/5)
    I wanted to love this, really. But it seemed more like a collection of interrelated incidents than one full story. Some of the incidents I liked (The Witch's Headstone, which was used as an isolated story in M is for Magic) but overall this didn't hold together for me. Maybe I set the bar too high; maybe it's me and not the book that disappoints.
  • (4/5)
    I enjoyed the characters more than the actual story. I really liked Nobody- the main character who was raised in a graveyard. His view of the world is fascinating- he's so honest and doesn't believe in talking nonsense. Silas was mysterious and intelligent- I found him really fun to read about. Overall, the plot lacked in substance, but I really enjoyed it anyway.
  • (4/5)
    I mean, it's Neil Gaiman. I obviously was going to like it, as he is awesome. My only problem was with the end. It sort of just dropped off to me. I would say that I didn't notice the similarities to The Jungle Book until afterward, and now I sort of want to read it, rather than just rely on my Disney movie knowledge.

    So far this year The Graveyard Book has won the Newbery and the Cybil. So it's a pretty good year for Mr. Gaiman, I believe!