Genießen Sie von Millionen von eBooks, Hörbüchern, Zeitschriften und mehr - mit einer kostenlosen Testversion

Nur $11.99/Monat nach der Testversion. Jederzeit kündbar.

Siddhartha: eine indische Dichtung
Siddhartha: eine indische Dichtung
Siddhartha: eine indische Dichtung
eBook174 Seiten2 Stunden

Siddhartha: eine indische Dichtung

Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen

3/5

()

SpracheDeutsch
HerausgeberArchive Classics
Erscheinungsdatum1. Feb. 1922
Siddhartha: eine indische Dichtung
Vorschau lesen
Autor

Hermann Hesse

Hermann Hesse (1877–1962) was a German poet and novelist. Hesse spent time writing in Europe and later traveled to India to study ancient Eastern cultures and religions, forming the foundation for several of his works. His writing tends to focus on the quest of the individual for authenticity, spirituality, and understanding of the inner self. Best known for his novels Siddhartha and Steppenwolf, Hesse received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1946.

Ähnlich wie Siddhartha

Ähnliche E-Books

Rezensionen für Siddhartha

Bewertung: 3.0134932533733134 von 5 Sternen
3/5

6.670 Bewertungen148 Rezensionen

Wie hat es Ihnen gefallen?

Zum Bewerten, tippen

Die Rezension muss mindestens 10 Wörter umfassen

  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    A classic covering a man's journey in his discovery of the purpose of life. Easy to read and a most agreeable conclusion.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    An all-time classic. A moving fictionalized account of the Buddha's awakening. A quick yet moving and unforgettable tale.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    A book everyone should read about a man's spiritual journey.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    Read it when you're a teenager or if you're searching.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    Beautiful story about one man's spiritual journey. I think everyone should have a copy.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    Having only read one novel by Hesse before ("The Glass Bead Game,") this slim little volume wasn't what I expected when I requested "Siddhartha" from the library. Although this is a rather simple story, I found it to be a pretty enjoyable read.Siddhartha is a young Brahmin who goes through a number of phases in his lifetime, which contribute to his ultimate understanding of the universe. Hesse's simple style in this novel works well for the story, which was a fun read.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    SiddharthaBy: Hermann HesseNarrated by: Christopher PreeceThis is an audible book I requested and the review is voluntary. This is the first time I actually understand this book. I have read this book before a few times but it is a difficult book to read. For me, it is hard to stay focused and follow what is going on at times. With this audible book, with this narrator, I finally got the flow of the book! That's a big plus. Once I understood the basics of what was going on, I understood more. Do I understand all? No, but I get it a lot more. The narrator was wonderful with a clear, soothing voice that was perfect!
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    This is the second time I have read this book, and it is quite fascinating. An allegorical novel, Siddhartha follows the life of Siddhartha, a son of a Brahmin, and his religious and spiritual search for the Ultimate. We follow Siddhartha as he leaves his father's religion and house to become an ascetic. After many years of studying with the Samanas, he abandons the community to become a man of the world. He becomes rich and powerful, but even then he is not satisfied, and contemplates taking his own life to end his suffering. But, just as he is about to throw himself into the river, he hears a sound that will change him forever...Experiments in Reading
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    Very good book. Gives everything apart from actual enlightenment.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    Much has been written from a spiritual and literary view about this famous 1922 book by Nobel Prize winner Hermann Hesse. I will look at it from a historical context perspective. Hesse was born in 1877 into the generation immediately after the German victory of the Franco-Prussian War. Think of the generation in America born after WWII, or in England after the Napoleonic Wars. It was a generation full of bright futures and expectations, Germany would at long last fulfill its destiny on a global stage. As it turned out it was this same generation that lead Germany into the misery and defeat of WWI (1914-17) and the dream and future died in the slaughter of the trenches. So it was in the aftermath in 1922 Hesse the philosopher became popular with Germans with his introspection and inward looking examination of what life really meant, what is really important. The outer world had defeated Germany and it would find strength and solace by looking inward. Perhaps it is not surprising that another generation resonated with this same message of rejecting the outer world and embracing inner vision, the counter-culture of America in the 1960s, when Hesse's book first became widely read and known in English speaking countries.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    This review is specifically for the audio version read by Geoffrey Giuliano. This is a pretty suitable book for audio. It is only about five hours long and the story is straightforward. The narrator does a good job, but whoever records the intro and outro sections sounds like a maniac. I almost stopped listening after a few seconds.As for the book, it is one I've had on my shelf for decades but never read. I read Hesse's Steppenwolf, when I was a teen or maybe in my early twenties; I remember liking it but don't remember anything else about it. I thought Siddhartha was about the Buddha, but in fact, it is about someone who meets the Buddha but, while appreciating his teachings, realizes that you cannot achieve nirvana through teachings. One line I particularly remember is that knowledge can be taught, but wisdom cannot. During the course of the story, Siddhartha tries out many lifestyles and can be said to succeed in all of them, but he is still finding. Which relates to another great quote, which is that those who seek cannot find, because they are too focused on what they are seeking. Meaning they miss out on all the other things around them. By the end of the book, Siddhartha seems to have found what he needs to find. Whether or not you as a reader can embrace his ultimate philosophy is up to you. The contradictory nature of the book is that Siddhartha would probably tell you not to--you have to find your own.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    A well-to-do Brahman by birth, as a young man Siddhartha leaves home to pursue a spiritual satisfaction he hasn’t found in his father’s traditional teachings and practices. Throughout his life he follows his inner voice, learning from forest-dwelling ascetics, a brief stay with Gautama Buddha, friendships he forms with a courtesan and a wealthy businessman, and, finally, from an old ferryman, with whom he lives his own elder years. Slowly Siddhartha finds his own path to holiness, which he reaches only when he finally leaves teachings behind and simply recognizes the unity of all existence. What a beautiful tale this is, and one I’ll be revisiting again and again.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    A great, spiritual read. Tells the tale of Siddhartha, a young man with an unquenchable thirst for knowledge, till he finally hears the answer from a river.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    Nonsensical ideologies and philosophies aside, I really enjoyed this book. From a literary perspective, the author (and translator) did a masterful job of sucking me into the life and mind of Siddhartha. I felt like I was on a roller coaster of emotions and story lines and the protagonist journeyed through a life of seeking.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    If you've come to this novella, you, like Siddhartha, may be a seeker. You, like Siddhartha, may be struggling to discover the meaning of life, looking for enlightenment. Perhaps, you may be required to read it, surely, there is a reason this story is assigned reading, right? Well, truthfully, you may not find all the answers here but consider Hesse's poetic prose as a continuation of your personal journey.Like Odysseus, there is much to lure Siddhartha off his path and which deter him from achieving his goal. Still, his associations with Kamala, Kamaswami and Govinda are not wasted moments in Siddhartha's life, rather they are a piece of his learning experience. Surprisingly, it is when Siddhartha struggles the most, when he is at his lowest, the moment he finds his love is not reciprocated that he finds the answer. This is a book to be read and reread and although each read may be different than the last it will surely leave its impression upon your journey.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    I read this in high school as required reading for an AP Lit class. I actually found this one more interesting and enjoyed it at the time. If I were to read it now, as an adult, I don't know if I would enjoy it quite as much, but that's okay. I do recommend this one for those interested in philosophical reads.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    I read this in a few hours on a flight home. Teared up a few times. Still rolling it around in my head.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    I enjoyed this more than I thought I would. I wasn't really sure what to expect, being nearly 100 years old and translated to English (as well as nearly every other language in the world), but the narration was wonderful and sucked me right in. Siddhartha tells the story of a young Indian man who has decided to reject his comfortable lifestyle to seek enlightenment. At first this journey begins with self denial to find higher fulfillment, but as Siddhartha ages so do his opinions and worldviews. His journey takes him through luxury, love, hatred, desire, denial, and acceptance. Told with wonderful prose, many consider this novel to be the finest moral allegory ever written. Only by failure, does Siddhartha find what he is looking for. Readers will find some aspect of Siddhartha's journey to relate to. “Wisdom cannot be imparted. Wisdom that a wise man attempts to impart always sounds like foolishness to someone else ... Knowledge can be communicated, but not wisdom. One can find it, live it, do wonders through it, but one cannot communicate and teach it.”
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    I am not really sure how to rate this book. As a story or novel, it was really nothing special at all. It was more of a parable than anything else. I did enjoy the message, but as a reader, I knew exactly how it was going to work out. Simply put, I am glad I read it because it did make me think about how I view myself and the things that I value. However, it did not have any "wow" factor and overall I would say - meh.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    This is a beautifully written book about Siddhartha, a young man who goes on a journey of self-discovery. I found this book a lot easier to read than I expected with lots of words about the meaning of our existence. Published in 1951 in the US and became very influential in the 1960's hippie movement. Experience, the totality of conscious events of a human life, is shown as the best way to approach understanding of reality and attain enlightenment. The novel is structured on three of the traditional stages of life (student, householder and recluse). Lesson learned: "it's not just intellectual cognition, not just learning and knowing, but spiritual experience that can be earned only through strict discipline in a selfless life." If you haven't read Siddhartha yet, you should give it a try as it may enlighten you as the direction of your life.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    A short book, this story relates how a young man leaves his home to try and find his place in the world, to find a place of peace. Along the way he learns how to control his body, he meets the Buddha, separates from his childhood friend, learns about physical love from a courtesan, about business, and how to listen to the river from a ferryman. He encounters his friend several times and compares how his search with help from the Buddha has compared to his own.This book is full of peace and I think I will reread it again and again for its gentle wisdom.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    Back when I was in college in the 1970s, I went on a serious, and predictable, Hermann Hesse reading jag ... and SIDDHARTHA was among those many, many titles. I have reread it many times in the years since then.. Presently, having just finished the book, I'm still glowing from the book's conclusion. Feeling a light and warm breeze, in a garden buzzing with bees, it was my favorite experience with a book in quite some time. These feelings are why I read.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    I think this is the kind of book I will have to reread more than once before I fully understand everything. It's quite a beautiful book, sometimes difficult to follow, but overall a fulfilling read.
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    Prachtige parabel, zij het soms iets te pathetisch. Ook Bildungsroman: alle stadia en ervaringen van het menselijke leven komen aan bod. Centrale boodschap aan ons westerlingen: "Zoeken is niet vinden".
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    I guess this book is often assigned in high school or college classes. I can imagine few things more insufferable than being forced to read something like this and not be able to feel it or identify with it. When you do feel it, though, it can be an incredibly cathartic experience, as it was for me.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    The story of Siddhartha who leaves home to find himself and experience life. Supposedly full of deeper life messages.While I can appreciate the writer's ability, I am not sure that I really liked Siddartha or the book.
  • Bewertung: 3 von 5 Sternen
    3/5
    Truth be told, I'm not a big fan. I prefer my fiction to be less life-lessonlike. Maybe I didn't relate in 1975 because Siddhartha was male. But I'm not exactly drawn to read it again. And states of out-of-body bliss scare me.

    "No longer knowing whether time existed, whether this display had lasted a second or a hundred years, whether there was a Siddhartha, or a Gotama, a Self and others, wounded deeply by a divine arrow which gave him pleasure, deeply enchanted and exalted, Govinda stood yet a while bending over Siddhartha's peaceful face which he had just kissed, which had just been the stage of all present and future forms."

    This is a book with answers. I prefer questions.
  • Bewertung: 2 von 5 Sternen
    2/5
    This was a difficult read for me. It was boring and I really disliked the main character, Siddhartha. It's considered one of the most widely read books of the 20th century as it became a favorite of the counterculture of the 1960s and had been on my list for a while. Now, that's taken care of...lol.From the book's Introduction: "Hermann Hesse's Siddhartha is a great story, a tale of a gifted individual struggling to discover the meaning of his life. Through his many colorful adventures, he does not settle for conventional answers, but experiences the whole range of human possibilities for himself and comes finally to profound insight and vast compassion."
  • Bewertung: 4 von 5 Sternen
    4/5
    A philosophical account of a man's life passage through his questions and transformations at different stages.
  • Bewertung: 5 von 5 Sternen
    5/5
    My first experience with Hermann Hesse came in the fall of 2005 when I took Anthropology of Religion in my senior year at Texas A&M. We read an excerpt from The Glass Bead Game and I was deeply moved by the beauty of Hesse's writing, as were many people, thus earning him the Nobel Prize in 1946.I don't remember when or where I purchased Siddhartha, but the appeal of the story of a spiritual journey and my desire to read more of Hesse's works were too tempting to deny. That being said, I don't know why I've held onto the book for so long without reading it, especially since it is not a very long novel.Siddhartha is beautifully written and mirrors my own spiritual journey. I am of a different faith than the characters in the book, but that is irrelevant to my appreciation of the story. There is much wisdom in the story, and "Wisdom," Siddhartha says, "is not communicable." A wise statement, yes, which then makes it foolish.Wisdom is communicable, but not always through pedagogical language. It is communicated through the sound of a river, a life lived, or a story. This book is a book of wisdom and it must be read carefully and reflectively to be received.

Buchvorschau

Siddhartha - Hermann Hesse

The Project Gutenberg EBook of Siddhartha, by Hermann Hesse

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

Title: Siddhartha

Author: Hermann Hesse

Posting Date: May 30, 2011 [EBook #2499] Release Date: February, 2001 [Last updated: December 23, 2012]

Language: German

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SIDDHARTHA ***

Produced by Michael Pullen, globaltraveler5565@yahoo.com, with the assistance of Stefan Langer, sl99@gmx.de, in scanning the original 1922 edition and Dr. Mary Cicora, mcicora@yahoo.com, with the proofreading of this transcription.

SIDDHARTHA

Eine indische Dichtung

von Hermann Hesse

ERSTER TEIL

Romain Rolland dem verehrten Freunde gewidmet

DER SOHN DES BRAHMANEN

Im Schatten des Hauses, in der Sonne des Flußufers bei den Booten, im Schatten des Salwaldes, im Schatten des Feigenbaumes wuchs Siddhartha auf, der schöne Sohn des Brahmanen, der junge Falke, zusammen mit Govinda, seinem Freunde, dem Brahmanensohn. Sonne bräunte seine lichten Schultern am Flußufer, beim Bade, bei den heiligen Waschungen, bei den heiligen Opfern. Schatten floß in seine schwarzen Augen im Mangohain, bei den Knabenspielen, beim Gesang der Mutter, bei den heiligen Opfern, bei den Lehren seines Vaters, des Gelehrten, beim Gespräch der Weisen. Lange schon nahm Siddhartha am Gespräch der Weisen teil, übte sich mit Govinda im Redekampf, übte sich mit Govinda in der Kunst der Betrachtung, im Dienst der Versenkung. Schon verstand er, lautlos das Om zu sprechen, das Wort der Worte, es lautlos in sich hinein zu sprechen mit dem Einhauch, es lautlos aus sich heraus zu sprechen mit dem Aushauch, mit gesammelter Seele, die Stirn umgeben vom Glanz des klardenkenden Geistes. Schon verstand er, im Innern seines Wesens Atman zu wissen, unzerstörbar, eins mit dem Weltall.

Freude sprang in seines Vaters Herzen über den Sohn, den Gelehrigen, den Wissensdurstigen, einen großen Weisen und Priester sah er in ihm heranwachsen, einen Fürsten unter den Brahmanen.

Wonne sprang in seiner Mutter Brust, wenn sie ihn sah, wenn sie ihn schreiten, wenn sie ihn niedersitzen und aufstehen sah, Siddhartha, den Starken, den Schönen, den auf schlanken Beinen Schreitenden, den mit vollkommenem Anstand sie Begrüßenden.

Liebe rührte sich in den Herzen der jungen Brahmanentöchter, wenn Siddhartha durch die Gassen der Stadt ging, mit der leuchtenden Stirn, mit dem Königsauge, mit den schmalen Hüften.

Mehr als sie alle aber liebte ihn Govinda, sein Freund, der Brahmanensohn. Er liebte Siddharthas Auge und holde Stimme, er liebte seinen Gang und den vollkommenen Anstand seiner Bewegungen, er liebte alles, was Siddhartha tat und sagte, und am meisten liebte er seinen Geist, seine hohen, feurigen Gedanken, seinen glühenden Willen, seine hohe Berufung. Govinda wußte: dieser wird kein gemeiner Brahmane werden, kein fauler Opferbeamter, kein habgieriger Händler mit Zaubersprüchen, kein eitler, leerer Redner, kein böser, hinterlistiger Priester, und auch kein gutes, dummes Schaf in der Herde der Vielen. Nein, und auch er, Govinda, wollte kein solcher werden, kein Brahmane, wie es zehntausend gibt. Er wollte Siddhartha folgen, dem Geliebten, dem Herrlichen. Und wenn Siddhartha einstmals ein Gott würde, wenn er einstmals eingehen würde zu den Strahlenden, dann wollte Govinda ihm folgen, als sein Freund, als sein Begleiter, als sein Diener, als sein Speerträger, sein Schatten.

So liebten den Siddhartha alle. Allen schuf er Freude, allen war er zur Lust.

Er aber, Siddhartha, schuf sich nicht Freude, er war sich nicht zur Lust. Wandelnd auf den rosigen Wegen des Feigengartens, sitzend im bläulichen Schatten des Hains der Betrachtung, waschend seine Glieder im täglichen Sühnebad, opfernd im tiefschattigen Mangowald, von vollkommenem Anstand der Gebärden, von allen geliebt, aller Freude, trug er doch keine Freude im Herzen. Träume kamen ihm und rastlose Gedanken aus dem Wasser des Flusses geflossen, aus den Sternen der Nacht gefunkelt, aus den Strahlen der Sonne geschmolzen, Träume kamen ihm und Ruhelosigkeit der Seele, aus den Opfern geraucht, aus den Versen der Rig-Veda gehaucht, aus den Lehren der alten Brahmanen geträufelt.

Siddhartha hatte begonnen, Unzufriedenheit in sich zu nähren. Er hatte begonnen zu fühlen, daß die Liebe seines Vaters, und die Liebe seiner Mutter, und auch die Liebe seines Freundes, Govindas, nicht immer und für alle Zeit ihn beglücken, ihn stillen, ihn sättigen, ihm genügen werde. Er hatte begonnen zu ahnen, daß sein ehrwürdiger Vater und seine anderen Lehrer, daß die weisen Brahmanen ihm von ihrer Weisheit das meiste und beste schon mitgeteilt, daß sie ihre Fülle schon in sein wartendes Gefäß gegossen hätten, und das Gefäß war nicht voll, der Geist war nicht begnügt, die Seele war nicht ruhig, das Herz nicht gestillt. Die Waschungen waren gut, aber sie waren Wasser, sie wuschen nicht Sünde ab, sie heilten nicht Geistesdurst, sie lösten nicht Herzensangst. Vortrefflich waren die Opfer und die Anrufung der Götter—aber war dies alles? Gaben die Opfer Glück? Und wie war das mit den Göttern? War es wirklich Prajapati, der die Welt erschaffen hat? War es nicht der Atman, Er, der Einzige, der All-Eine? Waren nicht die Götter Gestaltungen, erschaffen wie ich und du, der Zeit untertan, vergänglich? War es also gut, war es richtig, war es ein sinnvolles und höchstes Tun, den Göttern zu opfern? Wem anders war zu opfern, wem anders war Verehrung darzubringen als Ihm, dem Einzigen, dem Atman? Und wo war Atman zu finden, wo wohnte Er, wo schlug Sein ewiges Herz, wo anders als im eigenen Ich, im Innersten, im Unzerstörbaren, das ein jeder in sich trug? Aber wo, wo war dies Ich, dies Innerste, dies Letzte? Es war nicht Fleisch und Bein, es war nicht Denken noch Bewußtsein, so lehrten die Weisesten. Wo, wo also war es? Dorthin zu dringen, zum Ich, zu mir, zum Atman,—gab es einen andern Weg, den zu suchen sich lohnte? Ach, und niemand zeigte diesen Weg, niemand wußte ihn, nicht der Vater, nicht die Lehrer und Weisen, nicht die heiligen Opfergesänge! Alles wußten sie, die Brahmanen und ihre heiligen Bücher, alles wußten sie, um alles hatten sie sich gekümmert und um mehr als alles, die Erschaffung der Welt, das Entstehen der Rede, der Speise, des Einatmens, des Ausatmens, die Ordnungen der Sinne, die Taten der Götter—unendlich vieles wußten sie—aber war es wertvoll, dies alles zu wissen, wenn man das Eine und Einzige nicht wußte, das Wichtigste, das allein Wichtige?

Gewiß, viele Verse der heiligen Bücher, zumal in den Upanishaden des Samaveda, sprachen von diesem Innersten und Letzten, herrliche Verse. Deine Seele ist die ganze Welt, stand da geschrieben, und geschrieben stand, daß der Mensch im Schlafe, im Tiefschlaf, zu seinem Innersten eingehe und im Atman wohne. Wunderbare Weisheit stand in diesen Versen, alles Wissen der Weisesten stand hier in magischen Worten gesammelt, rein wie von Bienen gesammelter Honig. Nein, nicht gering zu achten war das Ungeheure an Erkenntnis, das hier von unzählbaren Geschlechterfolgen weiser Brahmanen gesammelt und bewahrt lag.—Aber wo waren die Brahmanen, wo die Priester, wo die Weisen oder Büßer, denen es gelungen war, dieses tiefste Wissen nicht bloß zu wissen, sondern zu leben? Wo war der Kundige, der das Daheimsein im Atman aus dem Schlafe herüberzauberte ins Wachsein, in das Leben, in Schritt und Tritt, in Wort und Tat? Viele ehrwürdige Brahmanen kannte Siddhartha, seinen Vater vor allen, den Reinen, den Gelehrten, den höchst Ehrwürdigen. Zu bewundern war sein Vater, still und edel war sein Gehaben, rein sein Leben, weise sein Wort, feine und adlige Gedanken wohnten in seiner Stirn—aber auch er, der so viel Wissende, lebte er denn in Seligkeit, hatte er Frieden, war er nicht auch nur ein Suchender, ein Dürstender? Mußte er nicht immer und immer wieder an heiligen Quellen, ein Durstender, trinken, am Opfer, an den Büchern, an der Wechselrede der Brahmanen? Warum mußte er, der Untadelige, jeden Tag Sünde abwaschen, jeden Tag sich um Reinigung mühen, jeden Tag von neuem? War denn nicht Atman in ihm, floß denn nicht in seinem eigenen Herzen der Urquell? Ihn mußte man finden, den Urquell im eigenen Ich, ihn mußte man zu eigen haben! Alles andre war Suchen, war Umweg, war Verirrung.

So waren Siddharthas Gedanken, dies war sein Durst, dies sein Leiden.

Oft sprach er aus einem Chandogya-Upanishad sich die Worte vor: Fürwahr, der Name des Brahman ist Satyam—wahrlich, wer solches weiß, der geht täglich ein in die himmlische Welt. Oft schien sie nahe, die himmlische Welt, aber niemals hatte er sie ganz erreicht, nie den letzten Durst gelöscht. Und von allen Weisen und Weisesten, die er kannte und deren Belehrung er genoß, von ihnen allen war keiner, der sie ganz erreicht hatte, die himmlische Welt, der ihn ganz gelöscht hatte, den ewigen Durst.

Govinda, sprach Siddhartha zu seinem Freunde, Govinda, Lieber, komm mit mir unter den Banyanenbaum, wir wollen der Versenkung pflegen.

Sie gingen zum Banyanenbaum, sie setzten sich nieder, hier Siddhartha, zwanzig Schritte weiter Govinda. Indem er sich niedersetzte, bereit, das Om zu sprechen, wiederholte Siddhartha murmelnd den Vers:

Om ist Bogen, der Pfeil ist Seele,

Das Brahman ist des Pfeiles Ziel,

Das soll man unentwegt treffen.

Als die gewohnte Zeit der Versenkungsübung hingegangen war, erhob sich Govinda. Der Abend war gekommen, Zeit war es, die Waschung der Abendstunde vorzunehmen. Er rief Siddharthas Namen. Siddhartha gab nicht Antwort. Siddhartha saß versunken, seine Augen standen starr auf ein sehr fernes Ziel gerichtet, seine Zungenspitze stand ein wenig zwischen den Zähnen hervor, er schien nicht zu atmen. So saß er, in Versenkung gehüllt, Om denkend, seine Seele als Pfeil nach dem Brahman ausgesandt.

Einst waren Samanas durch Siddharthas Stadt gezogen, pilgernde Asketen, drei dürre, erloschene Männer, nicht alt noch jung, mit staubigen und blutigen Schultern, nahezu nackt von der Sonne versengt, von Einsamkeit umgeben, fremd und feind der Welt, Fremdlinge und hagere Schakale im Reich der Menschen. Hinter ihnen her wehte heiß ein Duft von stiller Leidenschaft, von zerstörendem Dienst, von mitleidloser Entselbstung.

Am Abend, nach der Stunde der Betrachtung, sprach Siddhartha zu

Govinda: "Morgen in der Frühe, mein Freund, wird Siddhartha zu den

Samanas gehen. Er wird ein Samana werden."

Govinda erbleichte, da er die Worte hörte und im unbewegten Gesicht seines Freundes den Entschluß las, unablenkbar wie der vom Bogen losgeschnellte Pfeil. Alsbald und beim ersten Blick erkannte Govinda: Nun beginnt es, nun geht Siddhartha seinen Weg, nun beginnt sein Schicksal zu sprossen, und mit seinem das meine. Und er wurde bleich wie eine trockene Bananenschale.

O Siddhartha, rief er, wird das dein Vater dir erlauben?

Siddhartha blickte herüber wie ein Erwachender. Pfeilschnell las er in Govindas Seele, las die Angst, las die Ergebung.

O Govinda, sprach er leise, "wir wollen nicht Worte verschwenden.

Morgen mit Tagesanbruch werde ich das Leben der Samanas beginnen.

Rede nicht mehr davon."

Siddhartha trat in die Kammer, wo sein Vater auf einer Matte aus Bast saß, und trat hinter seinen Vater und blieb da stehen, bis sein Vater fühlte, daß einer hinter ihm stehe. Sprach der Brahmane: Bist du es, Siddhartha? So sage, was zu sagen du gekommen bist.

Sprach Siddhartha: Mit deiner Erlaubnis, mein Vater. Ich bin gekommen, dir zu sagen, daß mich verlangt, morgen dein Haus zu verlassen und zu den Asketen zu gehen. Ein Samana zu werden ist mein Verlangen. Möge mein Vater dem nicht entgegen sein.

Der Brahmane schwieg, und schwieg so lange, daß im kleinen Fenster die

Sterne wanderten und ihre Figur veränderten, ehe das Schweigen in der

Kammer ein Ende

Gefällt Ihnen die Vorschau?
Seite 1 von 1