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From the Publisher

'7 Steps to Becoming an Impressive Communicator'

I truly believe that a better communication with ourselves and between individuals not only is possible but also when we do it, it can improve the quality of our lives and the decisions we make in amazing ways.

Knowing who we are in ways that allow us to set boundaries and harness the power of communication with ourselves and with those we love is a very powerful way of living that is not taught in our schools or societies.

Nobody should ever be told what they are capable or incapable of doing, what they can or can’t be as the only person who holds this information is yourself and the only way to access this information and communicate it to others is by learning who you are and how to present it to the world. This knowledge is very empowering, particularly when you are dealing with individuals who are so convinced about knowing you and what you can and should do that they end up confusing you about who you truly are, annulling your identity and destroying your true self when in reality, they simply don't know a thing.

Each of us is unique and each of us need to be and express ourselves in the ways we are meant to, without feeling disregarded and without having to disregard others unnecessarily.

I really hope that you find this information of value and that you can use it to serve you, to provide you with the peace of mind you deserve and to improve your relationship with yourself and with others in your life. Self acceptance was my first step.

With Love,
Beatriz Valverde Garzon

Published: Beatriz Valverde Garzon on
ISBN: 9781301359943
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