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Tithe: A Modern Faerie Tale

Tithe: A Modern Faerie Tale

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Tithe: A Modern Faerie Tale

Bewertungen:
4/5 (309 Bewertungen)
Länge:
276 Seiten
4 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Jun 20, 2008
ISBN:
9781439106624
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

From Scribd: About the Book

#1 New York Times Bestselling author Holly Black is known for her contemporary fantasy novels written for children and young adult audiences. In Tithe: A Modern Faerie Tale, Black creatively shows the contrast between gritty and believable regular human world versus the beautiful and scary world of Faerie.

Follow the story of Kaye, who is anything but a normal sixteen-year-old girl. Her mom is a punk rocker in a band who was forced to grow up too quickly when she became pregnant with Kaye. Rather than going to school, Kaye works full time.

They move back to Kaye’s hometown to move in with Kaye’s grandmother after her mother’s boyfriend tries to kill her. Kaye hoped that her ability to see faeries would stay behind her in the move, but that’s hardly the case.

Although there is a sprinkle of a love-story intertwined, most of the story focuses on the intrigue and politics within the Faerie Courts.

Freigegeben:
Jun 20, 2008
ISBN:
9781439106624
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Holly Black is the author of bestselling contemporary fantasy books for kids and teens. Some of her titles include The Spiderwick Chronicles (with Tony DiTerlizzi), the Modern Faerie Tales series, the Curse Workers series, Doll Bones, The Coldest Girl in Coldtown, The Darkest Part of the Forest, the Magisterium series (with Cassandra Clare), and the Folk of the Air series. She has been a finalist for the Mythopoeic Award, a finalist for an Eisner Award, and the recipient of both an Andre Norton Award and a Newbery Honor. She lives in New England with her husband and son in a house with a secret door. Visit her at BlackHolly.com.


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Was die anderen über Tithe denken

4.0
309 Bewertungen / 147 Rezensionen
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  • (4/5)
    This was quite a lot better than I had expected it to be. The parts about the regular human world were very gritty and believable, and the descriptions of Faerie made it seem beautiful and quite scary, which it should be. It's partly a love-story, but the main emphasis is on the intrigue and politics at the Faerie Courts. Mainly I appreciated the fact that anytime a character got into trouble, it was because something or someone bad overpowered them, raising the stakes, and not because they did something stupid (it's a pet peeve of mine: plotlines advancing because the characters act like idiots, AKA Sookie Stackhouse Syndrome). There are some details I feel could have been edited more thoroughly (like Corny keeping his car keys inside his locked car), but for a first novel it's quite impressive.
  • (3/5)
    I started to read this book on recommendation, but never got into it. I know "you can't judge a book by it's cover" but I did. I couldn't get into the writing style and it seemed like she was just trying to make everything too cool. Trying too hard.
  • (3/5)
    Kaye, the child of a punk-rock chick that had to grow up too fast, finds herself back in her childhood hometown and discovers that the "imaginary" faery friends of her youth are very much real. Kaye is suddenly thrown into a struggle between two faery factions and is inexplicably drawn to the dangerous faery knight Roiben. While "Tithe" is interesting and gritty, I had to force myself to keep reading it as the beginning was heavy with obscure faery lore that was never really explained well. By the end of the book, I'd caught on enough to understand what was going on, but it still left me feeling vaguely unsatisfied. Even the love connection between Kaye and Roiben felt off, somehow. I'm not sure if I'll be continuing the series.
  • (4/5)
    Kaye is an unusual 16 year old girl. Her mother is in a rock band and Kaye works full time instead of going to school. But that is not what makes Kaye different, what makes her different is that she sees faeries. After her mother’s current boyfriend tries to kill her they move from the big smoke back to Kaye’s grandmother’s place. Kaye thought she had finally put the fairy nonsense behind her, but it turns out they had not put it behind them. Her life gets very interesting very fast. Soon she is caught in the middle of a power struggle, fighting for her life and her friends. Most of all what is the biggest secret Kaye has to learn in order to survive? However from page one I was hooked and could not put this book down. The writing flowed easily and there was an interesting dark humor that permeated the prose. I was surprised after reading this that it is considered young adult. At its lowest level it should be teen. There is swearing, drug abuse, drinking, and smoking which is all just in the first chapter. This book is quite edgy and dark.I really enjoyed this book and am looking forward to reading the next book in the series.
  • (4/5)
    Very Angst-y, Emo. Very Teen. It was a good story and I enjoyed it, but I'm the mother of a Teen, so I know that the Teen would enjoy it more than their mothers.
  • (3/5)
    Kaye is a high school dropout and the daughter of a wannabe rock start. When she meets and helps a stranger, she develops into a faerie. She ventures into faerie land, meeting new friends and enemies. Kaye is a crucial players in a war between good faeries and evil faeries. Tithe was highly recommended, but I thought it fell flat. The plot had a great premise and potential, but I thought some of the characters weren't flushed out enough or were unnecessary.
  • (2/5)
    I kept mentally editing this one, trying to make the plot more intricate. Predictable, but I enjoyed the prose style anyway.
  • (5/5)
    LOVED it. Gina & Rose both wrote excellent reviews, so check out theirs!
  • (4/5)
    Sixteen-year-old Kaye is a modern nomad. Fierce and independent, she travels from city to city with her mother's rock band until an ominous attack forces Kaye back to her childhood home. There, amid the industrial, blue-collar New Jersey backdrop, Kaye soon finds herself an unwilling pawn in an ancient power struggle between two rival faerie kingdoms—a struggle that could very well mean her death.When Kaye discovers she's actually a Changeling (changed at birth), her whole world starts to get really confusing, and some of the new friends she's met could possibly be her worst enemies.I really enjoyed this book, which portrays the struggle between the Seelie and the Unseelie Court of Faerie. It is dark and suspenseful, and definitely doesn't refer to the light fairy which perches on flowers and flutters about. I'm anxiously looking forward to book 2, Valiant, which is also waiting here on Mt. TBR.
  • (5/5)
    I cannot even tell you how many time Holly Black was recommended to me... And in my typical procrastinatory way, I kept putting it off!What was I thinking???I instantly loved Kaye. From the FIRST page when she stuck her cigarette into her mother's beer bottle! (what? So I'm a tad on the spiteful side...) The characters in this book are hard to rival, Roiben... well I was instantly taken with him (even though he can be quite tough to handle). Kaye's childhood faerie friends: Spike, Gristle and Lutie-Loo (Um Lutie-Loo? WIN!) actually I can't go into them much, because I'll give away too much of the story... But I loved their names!The entire faerie world that Black created is crazy amazing and magical! I could picture each and every detail of the pixies, dwarfs (dwarves?) and fae. Every place, battle and situation was so beautifully descriptive that I was enthralled (enthralled I tell you!) from beginning to end!I read this in the span of a few hours, I stayed up until like 2 am because I could NOT tear myself away from this book!
  • (5/5)
    Kaye thought she was a normal teen, though she did live a unusual life traveling around with her rock star mother. When she finds out that she is not as human as she thought she was and that she must now become involved in a war between the Unseelie and Seelie courts, she now not only has to deal with teenage issues, but live and death fairy issues as well.
  • (3/5)
    No character development, too many sexual innuendos for YA. The boys were all so sexual and I just don't find a guy with a harem suitable as one's love interest in YA. I also found a few typos and spelling mistakes. However, the plot was original and I liked the new paranormal elements. Might grab the next book in the series because I think Holly Black is a talented author.
  • (4/5)
    Kaye Fierch isn't your average 16-year-old girl. She hasn't been to school since she was 14. She got a job to help her Mom pay the bills. To be honest, she was more of an adult than her Mom, who spent all her nights in bars singing in a band. Besides, Kaye was always considered a little weird. As a child, she spoke to Faeries, though everyone thought it was all in her imagination.When an attack on her mom left the two without a place to stay, they were forced to go back to New Jersey to stay with Kaye's grandmother. As Kaye got a chance to look up old friends, she meets a Faerie Knight that is wounded. This starts off a chain of events that leads her right in the middle of a war between the two Faerie Courts, the Seelie and the Unseelie. The bright and the dark. The tradition of the Tithe is being brought back. It is the sacrifice of a mortal. And it will require that all the solitary fae, those that aren't a part of either court, be bound for seven years in servitude to the Unseelie court.Just when Kaye starts to understand that she herself is set up to be the mortal sacrifice, she is blindsided with more news. For the last 16 years, Kaye has been living a life that wasn't hers to live. She is not a mortal at all, but part of the Fae world herself. Now with her mortal friend, Corney, and the Dark Knight, Roiben, she has to figure out who to believe. Things are not always as they seem.I really enjoyed reading this book, although it is exceedingly darker than I originally expected. Holly Black has created a strange and dark world in which faeries aren't exactly the nicest creatures around. In fact, they are down-right frightening!! Kaye is a great character in that she has feet in both worlds. She is faerie by birth, but having lived in the mortal world for 16 years, she is starting to understand the delicate balance of power between the two worlds. And the need to keep each world in it's place.My only major complaint at all is that this book IS marketed to the young adult set. As a 16-year-old girl, Kaye spends more time in bars with her mother than anywhere else. She drinks and smokes and is a high school dropout. There is also a lot of sexual innuendo that is just way too much for those under the age of 16. It's not a book that I would go right out and buy for my son, who reads at this age level now, at age 11.But for older kids and adults, I think it's a unique story about new worlds. And I'm looking forward to reading Ironside, the follow-up to this book. 4/5
  • (4/5)
    Kaye Fierch has always been an outsider. She's 16 and lives on the road taking care of her out of control rock and roll mom. When a roadie tries to kill her mom, they end up back at grandmas house. The last time she was there she was a child,playing with make believe fairy friends.Now she finds she is the ultimate outsider--she isn't even human. She's a pixie who becomes involved in the life and death politics of the Seelie and more malevolent Unseelie court. And she meets a beautiful fairy knight, who is torn between Seelie and Unseelie and winds up falling for Kaye. As Kaye disrupts the balance of power, evil visits her human friends. Themes include being an outsider, love awakening, and the consequences of actions.The book also has homosexual roles and rather rough sexual overtones.
  • (4/5)
    Modern urban faery fantasy for YA. but it doesn't quite work. The initial premise is poorly thought through and becoems confusing later on when the internal consistency of the faery rules breaks down. At imes ti feels very much like a mid series book but it is't. The inconsistency of Kaye's background doens't help.Kaye is a modern teenager living with a single mum - singer - experincing many of the lows that such a changeable life can bring. but she's always had her faery friends to concole her. Even if no-one else really believe in them - apart form maybe some undetailed references to her primary school friends. After an arggument at a party she finds herself walking back thorugh the rainy woods and stumbles across a bleeding stranger. She shoudl know better than to invovle herself, but she does anyway and sicoversthe darker side of some of her faery friends. And maybe the truth about herself and her family. It's the inconsistency of the faery rules that grates most I think - food and time in faery land being especially problematic, but the vagracies of whether or not and to what degree iron has an effect seems contrived for each scene rather than being throught through as the details of the world. Kaye is particularly either effected or not almost at random. Kaye is never really belivable a s acharacter and even less so after the grand revelation which seems to come as no shock to her depsite a previous unbelivable obliviousness to it. The two attitudes don't mesh very well. Brief excerts into other characters viewpoints don't help. It's also very prudishly YA with no-one getting more than a kiss despite hte well know proclivities of the unseelie court that seems to exercise all the others.I believe this may be the author's debuet novel so a certain amount of forgivness in clunky writing may be in order - the world is interesting enough, but I'm unlikely to continue reading the rest of the series.
  • (3/5)
    Kaye, is an aimless high school dropout whose possibly alcoholic mother moves from place to place with whatever band she happens to be in at the moment. When her mom's boyfriend attacks her mom, they move back to New Jersey to live with her grandmother, where she grew up. While reconnecting with grade school friends, she misses her other friends, the faeries who were her playmates as a little girl. It isn't long before strange things start to happen to her, and she begins to find out the strange history of the world of Faerie and her own story.Kaye is a likeable enough heroine, and there were aspects of this story that were interesting. It didn't have a lot of substance to it, and was not especially ground-breaking or well-written. After being underwhelmed by the Spiderwick Chronicles, I probably should not have expected more from this, but I did hope, after all the rave reviews, that it would be something special. Finally, as something of a side note, I am not someone who believes YA should be totally sanitized, and everybody likes a bad girl, right? However, I thought this novel unnecessarily glamorized smoking/excessive drinking/blase attitude to sex/dropping out of school. I'm not moralistically uncomfortable with it, it just seemed to be trying a little too hard to be edgy, without the realism that would have made everything a bit more compelling.
  • (4/5)
    Have you ever read a novel and wished you'd found it sooner? It might seem strange, but even though I'm a frequent consumer of YA, I rarely find myself wishing I'd read a book when I was a teenager. Usually, I'm just glad for the experience; many YA writers craft immersive worlds and likable characters so skillfully that their works feel relevant despite the fact that I'm 26 years old. And it's not quite that I felt I was too old for Holly Black's Tithe, the story of a New Jersey teenager who learns of her faery nature when she's used as a pawn in the war between the Seelie and Unseelie Courts.No, instead I simply felt that Tithe would have struck a chord with me as a teenager, that it would have been incredibly relevant had I read it upon its release in 2002, when I was eighteen, rather than eight years later. Reading it now, as a grown-up, I mostly just felt nostalgic.Black describes the world of sixteen-year-old Kaye with surprising honesty and grit. Kaye lives in a magical land that I haven't often seen described in books, and certainly not with such accuracy: it's the world of my youth, New Jersey at the start of the twenty-first century. There are ravers and punk boys and long, emotionally complicated nights in diners. There are gay boys who love anime. There's the boardwalk of what I was sure must have been Asbury Park, abandoned and creepy and vivid. And, true-to-form, there's Kaye, an honestly written heroine if I've ever seen one. Kaye's a bit weird--she had fairies as imaginary friends since she was a kid--and definitely imperfect. She can't help but seduce her best friend's boyfriend. She gets her other friends into trouble. She's flawed, but, dammit, she's honest. As I read Tithe I couldn't help but feel that I knew Kaye--she's just about every teenage girl, complicated and conflicted. In short, she was terrific.As were most of the supporting characters here: Corny, Kaye's companion, one of the most realistically rendered gay friends I've ever seen in fiction. Corny isn't a magical and perfect gay boy a la Mercedes Lackey, but instead a complex and complete person in his own right. Likewise, Roiben, Kaye's otherworldly love interest, a sexy stoic with problems and a life beyond Kaye's.Unfortunately, the plotting of the novel doesn't quite live up to the promise of the characters. Black takes us a long time to get us to the central conflict, and Kaye's episodic explorations through the faery world just weren't as interesting to me as her adventures in the in the real world. Still, there's a lot worth exploring here--particularly if you've ever found magic in the magical kingdom known as New Jersey.
  • (2/5)
    You know, I read this book twice between when I bought it (sometime in 2004, I believe?) and when I gave it away to a teenage coworker towards the end of 2007 or beginning of 2008, but I don't remember a single thing about it.For all the hype I'd heard to make me want to read it, and everything since then about how it's a great story, it made absolutely no impression on me, other than the pretty cover with the butterfly.I'm sure it's a decent story, but memorable? Not in the least. Glancing at plot synopses, it's a lot like a hundred other stories about faeries and pixies and such that I have read, but without the really special qualities to make it stand out.
  • (4/5)
    This was a good novel to read. The beginning was interesting and it remained great until the conclusion. The novel could have ended better.
  • (4/5)
    Take a stroll into the edgy world of magic realism where it may look like home, but the lights are out and unbelievable fairy tale creatures have gathered inside. Sit back, enjoy the story, but never, ever eat the food.
  • (4/5)
    A pull you in and refuse to spit you out fantastical read! This book is amazingly addictive and completely immerses you in Holly Black's fantasy world of faerie and all creatures in between. The characters and the imagery were wonderfully depicted and the danger filled plot left me breathless. The ending left me wanting more. Kaye is a great character and I wish I was more like her!
  • (4/5)
    Good book, I found that the bad language was a little much, but all in all a good book.
  • (4/5)
    Love this book. Definitely a darker version of your typical fairy tale. The dark and mysterious leading man might be my favorite part of this book. Not the most complex plot, but enjoyable nonetheless.
  • (5/5)
    A modern faerie tale marketed at young adults but just as riveting for adults. Enter the dangerous world of the faerie courts and experience a world of magic, power and strange desires. Tithe takes the traditional faerie tale plot (involving evil queens, reluctant heroes and an unlikely love) and twists it into a thrilling story I simply couldn't put down. This book is an easy read, but the characters are well written, reacting in believable ways to unbelievable situations. Definitely worth the read!
  • (5/5)
    Tithe is exactly my kind of fairytale - gritty, real, and creepy as hell. The vivid writing is by turns enchanting and disturbing. In many ways, this is a story about power and what we choose to do with it. I enjoyed it immensely. I’m already looking forward to reading more from Ms. Black.
  • (5/5)
    Holly Black spins readers an enchanting world in her brilliant debut dark fantasy novel, TITHE. Kaye Fierch and her musician mother Ellen move back in with her grandmother in New Jersey after Ellen’s boyfriend mysteriously tried to attack her. Now Kaye is back amongst the friends she had to leave six years ago—both the human and the faerie ones.In the middle of the rainstorm, Kaye stops to help a wounded faerie knight named Roiben and attracts the attention of two warring faerie kingdoms, the Seelie and Unseelie Courts. The Unseelie Court has recently brought back the Tithe, a human sacrifice for the obedience of the solitary fey, among which are Kaye’s childhood faerie friends.An even more shocking secret is revealed to Kaye—she is actually a faerie herself, disguised with some very strong glamour! Her fey friends want her to go along with her selection for the Tithe and then reveal her true faerie identity at the last minute, thus making it seem like the Unseelie Queen was trying to kill her own kind.The trouble is that things don’t go exactly the way they planned. Kaye’s involvement in the faerie war means endangering her human friends, not to mention falling for Roiben, whom her friends warn her to stay away from. It’s hard to distinguish between friend and foe in this exciting world of faerie.Holly Black is not one to waste words, and so TITHE is written succinctly but beautifully. The plot is sometimes hard to follow, and even after my tenth or so reading this time everything’s still not all clear, but I think that’s part of what makes this book so exciting for me!
  • (5/5)
    This was very well-written, very lyrical, and shows quite a scary and sinister view of faeries. This is that Faery where humans should NOT eat or drink what's offered for fear of becoming trapped there. For instance, one character's misstep gets him wrapped in thorns, and all the pain that would entail…
  • (2/5)
    Either you enjoy this genre or you don't and by the end of this 300-page book, I've confirmed in my own mind that I don't. The suspension of disbelief required is too much, not to mention the romance-novel encounters between the mortal and fairy worlds and oh-so-daring language and cookie-cutter teen angst. Maybe if this was your fantasy, you'd be inclined to enjoy the story, but I never wanted to be a fairy, so I was just bored.
  • (4/5)
    This is a fun quick read. Although I am not a huge fan of fairy stories I did like this one. I think what gets me about the fairy stories is that their "history" is confusing with the different courts and all. Also fairies are very tricky and there are always lots of rules to follow or else the main characters(or mortals) always seem to be getting into trouble with the fairies. So overall I give it 4 stars.
  • (4/5)
    This book has been out for a while but for some reason I avoided it. When I first discovered it (years after it was written) I'm pretty sure I had had my fill of fairies at the time - having read Wicked Lovely by Melissa Marr. I had also heard people say how if you read Wicked Lovely first - you wouldn't like Tithe and vice-versa. So! I figured it would be a dud for me and I forgot about it for a while. And then! Well...I don't know why I thought about it again but the point is I did! And I'm glad I did. This book was amazing for me! I really really enjoyed it. It was edgy and witty and portrays faeries in a no nonsense way. They are what they are and Kaye is a part of that life whether she likes it or not.I really enjoyed the variety of characters - Kaye's crazy mother and overbearing grandmother - Cory, her best friend's gay brother who turns out to be a unlikely friend, of course there is beautiful and dangerous Roiben and The Thiselwitch who I found fascinating.The first in a series, I'm curious to see where it goes. I have to say, I think I liked Tithe just a bit more then Wicked Lovely. The world of faerie that Black created just appeals to me more. Theirs is a world that exists besides ours but could exist on it's own. I always felt like Marr's fairy world was too dependent on reality - if that makes any sense at all :)I would recommend this one to anyone who likes a good fairy fantasy story.