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Ironside: A Modern Faerie Tale

Ironside: A Modern Faerie Tale

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Ironside: A Modern Faerie Tale

Bewertungen:
4/5 (136 Bewertungen)
Länge:
290 Seiten
4 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Jul 1, 2008
ISBN:
9781416979449
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

In the realm of Faerie, the time has come for Roiben's coronation. Uneasy in the midst of the malevolent Unseelie Court, pixie Kaye is sure of only one thing -- her love for Roiben. But when Kaye, drunk on faerie wine, declares herself to Roiben, he sends her on a seemingly impossible quest. Now Kaye can't see or speak to Roiben unless she can find the one thing she knows doesn't exist: a faerie who can tell a lie.

Miserable and convinced she belongs nowhere, Kaye decides to tell her mother the truth -- that she is a changeling left in place of the human daughter stolen long ago. Her mother's shock and horror sends Kaye back to the world of Faerie to find her human counterpart and return her to Ironside. But once back in the faerie courts, Kaye finds herself a pawn in the games of Silarial, queen of the Seelie Court. Silarial wants Roiben's throne, and she will use Kaye, and any means necessary, to get it. In this game of wits and weapons, can a pixie outplay a queen?

Holly Black spins a seductive tale at once achingly real and chillingly enchanted, set in a dangerous world where pleasure mingles with pain and nothing is exactly as it appears.
Freigegeben:
Jul 1, 2008
ISBN:
9781416979449
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Holly Black is the author of bestselling contemporary fantasy books for kids and teens. Some of her titles include The Spiderwick Chronicles (with Tony DiTerlizzi), the Modern Faerie Tales series, the Curse Workers series, Doll Bones, The Coldest Girl in Coldtown, The Darkest Part of the Forest, the Magisterium series (with Cassandra Clare), and the Folk of the Air series. She has been a finalist for the Mythopoeic Award, a finalist for an Eisner Award, and the recipient of both an Andre Norton Award and a Newbery Honor. She lives in New England with her husband and son in a house with a secret door. Visit her at BlackHolly.com.


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4.1
136 Bewertungen / 72 Rezensionen
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Leser-Rezensionen

  • (3/5)
    Kaye, whose lover, Roiben, rules the Unseelie Court, has a quest so she can stay by Roiben's side: find a faery who can lie. Problem is that faeries can't lie.'Ironside' performs just as well as 'Tithe' and 'Valiant' do. It is well written, clever, gritty, and certainly worth buying.
  • (3/5)
    Third in the Modern Tales of Faery series, but second focusing on Kaye. This volume takes place mostly in the Faerie world, as Kaye tries to prove her love and loyalty to Roiben, and figure out her place in both worlds, as someone not really of either.I liked this one better than Tithe, and read it quickly, but it faded just as fast. There's not much of substance here, and that's probably just fine for most readers. Like a mediocre Chinese meal, it will remind you of the real thing, and briefly scratch the itch, but ultimately will make you long for something more authentic and fulfilling.
  • (4/5)
    This is the third (and I am assuming the last) in Black's 'Modern Faery's Tale' series. I don't know if the authors writing matured or I have grown used to her style. But I didn't get as annoyed with Kaye's immaturity as I did in the first novel. Yea for progress.I enjoyed the tangle she got herself into by being peer pressured into declaring herself to Roiben. I enjoyed that we were shown Roiben and given flashes of his feelings and priorities.I feel that by the end of this book Kaye matured enough that I would really love to read about her being Roiben's consort in future books. For all this series flaws (the writing just doesn't flow very well) I think the story and imagery more than make up for it.
  • (4/5)
    Very intriguing continuation of the first book. I find myself absorbed by the Robyn-Kaye relationship. Not many authors are capable of writing a story that has you questioning the characters motives. This story had me guessing right up to the last page.
  • (4/5)
    The story of Kaye continues to evolve in interesting and unique ways. Black does a very good job of taking seemingly inane ideas and making them new again.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book. So far I have really loved all the books in this series. This books continues where the book Valiant left off. Roiben is set to become king of the Unseelie court. Roiben struggles with what will happen when he is crowned king and the uncomfortable treaty with the Seelie court is broken; he wonders if war is inevitable. Kaye struggles with her place with Roiben and the Unseelie court. She is also struggling with the knowledge that the baby human whose place she grew up in is still alive and Kaye feels that she needs to reunite her "mother" with her true daughter. Corny struggles with his fear of fairy and his grief over the death of his sister.This book is an easy read. The characters are all likable. A few new main characters are introduced. Luis is a great character and as likable and angsty as the rest of them. The book is fast paced and is a great book about faery. I have always loved urban fantasy, Charles De Lint being the first urban fantasy author I ever read. This book is a great addition to my collection. There are new fairies, action, duels, riddles, curses, you name it. I love how there is a little romance in the book but it is not overpowering; relationships are kept to simple hugging, kissing, and cuddling. There are too many fantasy book out there that get too physically in depth with the love thing, if you know what I mean (see Laurell Hamilton book review). This book leaves you with a happy pleasant feeling at the conclusion.That being said I am always surprised that these are considered young adult books. There is a lot of swearing and also more "adult" topics to deal with. For example Corny is gay and the Unseelie court revels in a number of horrific forms of torture and killing. None of these things are gone into in overly explicit detail but still. I would say that mid to upper teens would be okay with these books; they are not books that I would read to my 10 year old or younger.Still these books are fun and enjoyable. The author definitely has a love of fine literature and I enjoy all of the fine literature quotes at the beginning of each chapter. Black seems to pick these quotes with care so that they reveal and foreshadow the chapter to come. I love it!I hope there will be another book; although this book is wrapped up pretty nicely so who can say.
  • (4/5)
    I like the way she ended Kaye and Roiben's stories. I wish she would have finished up, or tied in Val's story. I felt like she kinda left us hanging, and it made Valiant not make sense in the series.
  • (5/5)
    Ironside starts off a few months after the events of Tithe and Kaye has been feeling lost as she doesn't know where she belongs, so she drunkenly declares herself to Roiben, and he sends her on an impossible quest. Meanwhile Queen Silarial is still trying to kill Roiben, so Kaye also has to prevent her, though they don't know what she's planning. She is joined on her quest by Corny, and also someone from Valiant(I wont give away who) which I was pleased with because i had not really seen Valiant as a sequel but more of a companion book. I have to agree with the previous reviewer that Ironside completely lives up to it's prequels. It is a great book that will not disappoint.
  • (4/5)
    Wasn't *quite* as good as the first two, in my opinion. It was still good, but I think I wanted a little more action. Or something. I hope she writes more books in this world, though. I really have become attached to the characters.
  • (4/5)
    Corny, Roiben, and Kaye return with all the other familiar characters in this satisfying sequel to Black's first YA novel "Tithe". The story opens with Roiben's coronation as King of the Unseelie Court. As a result, the longstanding peace between the Seelie and Unseelie courts is broken and the Faerie world finds itself in the midst of war for the first time in an age. With a backdrop of war and court intrigue Kaye is dealing with serious relationship problems and is coming to grips with the knowledge that she's faery, not a human girl she like she thought she was. A great read, but I highly recommend you read "Tithe" first.
  • (4/5)
    Pixie changeling Kaye is in love with the king of the Unseelie Court. There is war brewing with his kingdom and the rival Seelie Court. Kaye finds herself in the middle as the possible key to bringing peace and stopping death on the faerie and human side. She also struggles with the desire to tell her human mother that she is not the daughter she gave birth to while her best friend, the human Corny, joins her on this quest.
  • (4/5)
    Maybe shy of four stars but easily tops 3-1/2. I really should have read this sooner after the first two books. The first two were so independent of each other that it didn't occur to me that the characters of the first two would come together in the third. It wasn't critical but it would have been advantageous.

    This was a very good series. The Spiderwick Chronicles were very much fun. I think I'll be moving White Cat to one of my short lists now that it's finally out.
  • (2/5)
    Rated: R Language, Adult Situations

    Exciting. Great storyline.
  • (3/5)
    I decided to listen to this audiobook a few years after not being very impressed with the first book in the Modern Faerie series while I waited for the second book Holly Black's Curse Workers series to be released. Well, Curse Workers is the series I prefer. The Modern Faerie series isn't for me. It's a little too gritty for me. Though I appreciate this book was a fantastic way of telling a story I didn't really like, if that makes any sense.I enjoyed the way Black uses the framework of the "Beauty & the Beast" tell to shape her story here without making it a straight-up retelling. I liked Val's independence, but I'd hesitate to call her a strong protagonist. I liked some of the magical elements, but like I said, this book wasn't for me.There's also a scene in the book that had me sobbing hysterically and feeling just disgustingly awful for a long time after. If I had known about it beforehand, I would never have picked up this book. So, here's my warning in hopes it may help someone (without being too spoilery) -- if you are sensitive to any kind of animal abuse, do not read this book.
  • (5/5)
    I loved the trilogy. Such a fun read. Such a good book.
  • (1/5)
    Not really a sequel to Tithe, and absolutely nothing like it. The only likable character in the whole book is a troll. Could not relate and didn't want to.
  • (3/5)
    Not quite as good as 'Tithe,' I thought, but I still enjoyed this very much.
    Val, a teen from New Jersey, runs away when she finds out that her mom has been having an affair with her boyfriend. In shock, she goes to NYC, and falls in with some squatter kids living in the subway tunnels.

    The best part of the book is the portrayal of the squatters, and the culture clash between their reality and that of the sheltered suburbanites. The author really captured the milieu - how such kids can be troubled, yet smart, have issues, but yet be welcoming, supportive and accepting. Still, she doesn't romanticize it.
    It reminded me (a lot) of stuff I did in my teen years. I found it convincing.

    Of course, urban vs. suburban isn't the only conflict here - the squatter kids are in touch with faeries, and involved with running a magic potion that helps urban faeries survive in the presence of iron. Unfortunately, for humans, the effects are an awful lot like those of heroin.

    When faeries start turning up dead, the mystery of who's killing them needs to be solved... and that's where I didn't think the book was as strong. It ended up being a pretty typical drugs-and-murder-mystery kind of plot, with a bit of supernatural romance thrown in. It wasn't bad, but, as I said, I liked 'Tithe' better. (I thought this was a sequel, but they both work as stand-alone novels; they're just set in the same reality.)
  • (3/5)
    I decided to listen to this audiobook a few years after not being very impressed with the first book in the Modern Faerie series while I waited for the second book Holly Black's Curse Workers series to be released. Well, Curse Workers is the series I prefer. The Modern Faerie series isn't for me. It's a little too gritty for me. Though I appreciate this book was a fantastic way of telling a story I didn't really like, if that makes any sense.I enjoyed the way Black uses the framework of the "Beauty & the Beast" tell to shape her story here without making it a straight-up retelling. I liked Val's independence, but I'd hesitate to call her a strong protagonist. I liked some of the magical elements, but like I said, this book wasn't for me.There's also a scene in the book that had me sobbing hysterically and feeling just disgustingly awful for a long time after. If I had known about it beforehand, I would never have picked up this book. So, here's my warning in hopes it may help someone (without being too spoilery) -- if you are sensitive to any kind of animal abuse, do not read this book.
  • (5/5)
    It's amazing. It's wonderful, and it completely captivates you.
  • (2/5)
    I was really hoping to like this book. I was disappointed however. The characters were not well defined or built. The relationship between Valerie and her mother isn't explored well enough to elicit the type of response that Valerie expressed. Valerie isn't well defined either to explain why she would choose to go so far off the deep end over one incident. The sudden unexplained feelings between Ravus and Valerie also seemed dis-jointed and unaccounted for within the story, a sideways glance or two doesn't constitute undying love. I feel that the author could have done so much more with this story if time was taken to fully develop the characters. The plot is interesting but moves along in fits and starts. I'll continue to read this author because I believe that there is the good beginnings of great writing; I just hope to see it.
  • (5/5)
    well writen story my kids enjoyed this book as we read this book at bedtime and they liked all the ups and downs as they said about this story and I had to get more of Holly Black's book for them
  • (1/5)
    I've only read the first 100 pages but I hate the main character so much I just can't continue, and I am not usually one to give up on a crappy book/ movie that I paid actual money for.
  • (4/5)
    Holly Black is beautiful. I am not commenting on her appearance, though I am sure she is a very pretty person, I am stating that the way she creates these fair-tale-nightmare-dreamscapes in the modern world is nothing short of art and therefore beautiful. Even though this book has nothing to do with the star-crossed lovers of the first book the new couple is still as weird, messed up and cute as the first. The start of the book is one of my favorite parts, because Black takes a normal suburban teenaged girl and finds such a life changing event that it would cause her to go live in the city as a drug dealing hobo. This was indeed a stretch, yet at the same time it gives Valerie a very rebellious side and the idea that she was never content with her home life. One theme prevalent in the series is how things that seem nice are really horrible and deadly. I really enjoyed how messed up some of the events in the book are, they play on the fact that life is grimy and gritty and messed up, but there is always a way to find happiness or at least a happy ending. The cameo of Kaye and Robin was so perfect though!
  • (4/5)
    Just as pretty as Tithe, and with some more meat; of the three books so far published I do like this one the best.


    --

    Still not the biggest fan of Holy Black, but six years later I still really like the end of this story. Really needed a dose of the bizarre that only faery can give.
  • (2/5)
    Valiant: A Modern Tale of Faerie by Holly Black. Some interesting ideas. Fairly suspenseful. However, I thought it odd that a seventeen-year-old would have unprotected sex and share a needle while taking a new drug with no mention of pregnancy, HIV, or any STDS. Addiction was very lightly mentioned. It was all too casual, I felt, for a Young Adult book.
  • (5/5)
    It's time for Roiben's coronation to be made the offical king of the depraved Unseelie Court. Kaye, who is just getting used to her pixie state after being raised as a human, is having trouble fitting in to the court. During the celebration, Kaye drinks more faerie wine than she should and drunkenly declares her love for Roiben in fae tradition. It's customary for him to give her some sort of trial, an easy one if the love is returned, and she can't see or speak to him until the task is done. His task is for her to find a faerie who can lie, which is completely impossible. Shocked and reeling, Kaye returns to her home and goes into a shame spiral, resulting in telling her mother that she is a changeling. When trying to retrieve her human counterpart, Silarial, queen of the Seelie Court, attempts to ensare Kaye into her plan to take the Unseelie throne from Roiben. How can Kaye hope to beat the ancient queen of the faeries at her own game?I seriously love this series so much. I have no idea why I waited so long to read it. It combines so many things that I love: dark faeries, realistic characters, twisty plots, unconventional romances, sword fights, and games of wit. While there is one fairly one dimensional villain, both sides of the conflict are largely in shades of grey where both do good and evil for different reasons. How they appear is not usually how they actually are and it has led to many surprising and turns in the series. This installment also merges the characters from Tithe with those from Valiant, but I felt they were underutilized considering an entie book was spent building up their characters. I especially loved returning to Kaye and Roiben and seeing that the events of Tithe didn't magically make all of their problems go away. Kaye is still lost as a newfound pixie and Roiben still holds all his feelings inside without sharing all of himself with Kaye. Now that Kaye knows what she is, she no longer truly belongs to the faerie world or the human world. Faeries view her as ignorant, socially inept, and someone to play tricks on, as close to human as a fae can get. She sticks to the human world most of the time because she can at least glamour herself to fit in even though she knows she doesn't belong there anymore. As before, she's prone to drowning her sorrows in booze instead of facing them head-on. This paired with her eagerness to be accepted into fae society as Roiben's mate drove her to declare herself to Roiben. Roiben also has a lot of baggage. He feels similar to Kaye about the Seelie and Unseelie Courts. While the depravity and cruelty of the Unseelie Court disgusts him, he has found that the Seelie Court isn't much better after being blind for so long, especially since he has seen his former Queen and former beloved Silarial's true colors. Kaye is his escape from all of it and he didn't want to endanger her by putting a big target on her forehead as someone to torture or kill to get to him. While his reasonings aren't terrible, he doesn't share anything with Kaye. leading to her spiral after he very publicly and soundly rejects her declaration. Ironside is an amazing end to a strong series. I was on the edge of my seat for much of the end since I couldn't figure out how Roiben and Kaye would get out of their predicament. The clever thinking and faerie logic that leads the story in unexpected places is unparalleled. Holly Black is the queen of faerie stories as far as I'm concerned and I can't wait to read The Cruel Prince when it comes out. She always writes unexpected stories with engaging characters and I will read every book she writes, especially if it's in the fae world.
  • (3/5)
    Ironside is the third and final book in the Modern Faerie Tales trilogy and it was a pretty good ending. Valiant is still my favorite of the three, however I really did like this book.Ironside was hard to put down. It didn’t pull me in as much as Valiant, or even Tithe, but I still wanted to keep reading to find out how it all would end. I have to admit though that I was just a tiny bit disappointed in the ending. It just didn’t feel finished.Holly Black is a fabulous writer. She creates a gripping story filled with friendship and danger. So of course I would definitely recommend this trilogy to everyone. All three books are fast, fun and well written.
  • (4/5)
    This drew back together everyone I'd already grown rough and rugged little soft spots for. It's still gritty and dark, and some of the characters never lose their edges, but I loved seeing how it all came together. How the lies and the laughter and the magic and too sharp world all worked itself out.

    I was far happier by the end of this book than I ever expected to be.
  • (4/5)
    It’s time for Roiben’s coronation -- but when Kaye tries to swear her undying love to him, he sends her on an impossible quest which banishes her from his presence, seemingly forever. In her quest to find belonging, she finds herself a pawn in the games of the fae. Can a pixie outplay a queen? I bought this series at a used bookstore, and it sat on my to-read shelf for god-only-knows how many years before I finally picked it up and read it. It was good, but YA; book 2 definitely took a weird spin into unrelated territory before turning back; story elements I expected never appeared. It was satisfying, but the books went back into the used bookstore bag without much regret.
  • (5/5)
    The ultimate faerie book. You plunge into the unknown. Faerie worlds, creatures, underground tunnels filled with the homeless and the hopeless. And the main character is a headstrong hero. I don't like the kind of stories where the girls are dainty and need saving. She saves herself. I just love Holly Black, she writes fantastic stories. I especially love when she writes quotes at the beginning of the chapters. My favorite, and probably the most fitting is this quote:"Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away."-Philip k. Dick