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Catch-22: 50th Anniversary Edition

Catch-22: 50th Anniversary Edition

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Catch-22: 50th Anniversary Edition

Bewertungen:
4/5 (610 Bewertungen)
Länge:
769 Seiten
13 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Oct 26, 2010
ISBN:
9781451632965
Format:
Buch

Anmerkung des Herausgebers

A satirical masterpiece…

This satirical masterpiece brilliantly captures the bureaucratic absurdities of war. With a title that’s become synonymous with an intractable problem, Yossarian and company’s tragicomic plight resonates to this day. The Hulu series stars Christopher Abbott as John Yossarian and George Clooney as Lieutenant Scheisskopf.

Beschreibung

From Scribd: About the Book

Yossarian, a war hero who is furious over the idea of thousands of people he's never met are trying to kill him, knows that the enemy is not his biggest problem - it instead the army that he serves in. This army keeps increasing the number of missions Yossarian and his fellow pilots must fly to complete their service and be relieved of their duty, meaning that Yossarian must continue putting his life in danger. If he tries to excuse himself from duty, to escape these dangerous missions, he will be in violation of Catch-22, a comically evil bureaucratic rule that states: a man is considered insane if he willingly continues to fly dangerous combat missions, but if he makes a formal request to be removed from duty, he is proven sane and therefore ineligible to be relieved.

After celebrating fifty years of success, Catch-22 remains one of the highest renowned American novels, often celebrated for its comical, yet sinister, prose. Having been named to a variety of best novel lists in recent years, including Time, Newsweek, the Modern Library, and more, this novel set in Italy during World War II will be intriguing readers for many years to come.
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Oct 26, 2010
ISBN:
9781451632965
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Joseph Heller was born in Brooklyn in 1923. In 1961, he published Catch-22, which became a bestseller and, in 1970, a film. He went on to write such novels as Good as Gold, God Knows, Picture This, Closing Time, and Portrait of an Artist, as an Old Man. Heller died in 1999.


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4.1
610 Bewertungen / 259 Rezensionen
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Kritische Rezensionen

  • If you've ever described a situation as a 'catch-22' but you've never read Joseph Heller's satirical classic, you have to read it right now. Heller, like Hemingway, writes so cuttingly about warfare by drawing on his personal experiences serving in a world war.

    Scribd Editors
  • If you haven't read the tragically hilarious "Catch-22" yet, can I ask you how and why? It's had such a profound impact on our culture — how many times have you heard someone say "that's a catch-22" while raging against bureaucratic BS? — and it's about a dude named John Yossarian, which is, quite frankly, a fantastic name, worthy of its iconic status. You will laugh, and maybe cry, and probably do both at the same time since this is satire at its best. (It's also becoming a Hulu original series this May!)

    Scribd Editors

Leser-Rezensionen

  • (5/5)
    Catch-22 is one of the funniest, weirdest, most unique novels I’ve ever read. It presents the story of Yossarian, a World War II bombardier who is constantly inventing illnesses and ailments in hilarious attempts to prevent himself from having to fly dangerous missions, which is a realistic concerned, given that whole armies—thousands of people—are trying to kill him. The government bureaucracy is always one step ahead of poor Yossarian, though, and his attempts are thwarted by Colonel Cathcart, who constantly raises the number of missions the men must fly in order to fulfill their service.Heller’s characters and their experiences of army life are hysterical, maddening, and utterly mad, and his satire is spot-on. Catch-22 is a classic that should be on every bookshelf, whores and all.Full review at The Book Lady's Blog
  • (5/5)
    Listened to the Books on Tape audiobook version of this. The reader sounds like a 50s radio announcer, which totally adds to the experience. The Marx Brothers style dialogue really lends itself to audio as well. The work itself is a masterpiece of poignant satire and absurdity. Can be read and re-read -- there are many subtleties to pick up in each re-reading. Highly, highly recommended.
  • (5/5)
    The classic American novel for me. If you wish to understand that perfectly American process of taking a very serious matter such as WWII, and then giving it an artificial structure, the American army's Air force, then recruiting a number of fairly normal people to run it, and to be in it, then setting a minor role for those people, in this case, bombing Bologna, a fairly obscure target in the minor Italian theatre, and then cluttering this dangerous role with an arbitrary set of standards for success, and pursuing those standards to the extent of hampering that mission, this is the perfect novel. Heller's book has multiple levels of symbolism, and one finds that even the huge undertaking of WWII is but a symbol for American life overall, then Heller's novel has worked its wonders in your world view for the rest of your life. He did it to me, and I am not ashamed. The only flaw is that there are no well developed female characters in this book....
  • (5/5)
    Each day I come across Catch-22 situation, thamks to this book I can give them a proper name
  • (5/5)
    Best book ever written.
  • (5/5)
    It's rare to read a book where each sentence seems to have carefully chosen words that string together in perfect balance on the page. The novel seems to be more about the words than about the plot of the novel. There are many characters and I was glad I kept some notes to keep track of them. I would get lost in the story, but always enjoyed the words.
  • (4/5)
    (Original Review, 1981-02-20)The most memorable part for me is Milo sitting in a tree. He passes Yossarian something and encourages him to taste it - it is disgusting. What is it? Chocolate covered cotton. He's bought up the entire Egyptian cotton crop and can't find a way to sell it on. Every time I come across some disgusting processed food in the supermarket I think of that scene. And the ending, when Yossarian finally leaves the camp and it suddenly collapses into a cruel and bitter world (a man beating a donkey?) - that has stayed with me. From the Opening Sentence to the brutal but inspiring finale. No book has ever made me laugh so hard yet the last third of this book is a constant assault on the senses with the death toll spiraling out of control. One of my favourite episodes, which so resonates with today's bureaucratic world, is when Doc Daneeka's name is falsely on the list of occupants on plane to keep his flying pay topped up. When the plane crashes killing all on board he disappears from the USAAF paperwork and has to live in the woods next to the base...Heller writes it better than I.Keller was a visionary. Milo Minderbinder, General Dreedle, Scheisskopf, Wintergreen, Cathcart, Peckem - all total bastards, people who variants of which we have all had the misfortune of having to deal with in our lives and as always these people who end up the winners from the suffering of Yossarian and yet right at the end he gives you that bit of optimism, shows that if you don't give in if you can see through the system and figure out you don't have to be a part of it then maybe you have a chance of coming out on top.[2018 EDIT: 1981, back row, solid geometry class, high-school, math book wide open, hidden from view paperback "Catch-22", big smile. What fond memories.]
  • (5/5)
    First read this superb dystopian anti-war novel in 1970: Couldn't put it down; such a great read, but must have as the copy long ago went missing.Finally replenished my library & having re-read I was amazed at just how well Heller's writing stands up to modern day equivalents based on the hard-learned experiences of modern warfare.Heller's book detailing the catastrophic mental and physical anguish of Yossarian (surely one of the greatest 'human' characters in all of literature) is one of very few 'warfare' masterpieces to emerge post-WW2.The novel surpasses Jones' From Here To Eternity (&, different war, but as relevant Remarque's All Quiet On The Western Front) for its devastatingly accurate portrayal of the ordinary soldier trapped within the vast & supremely indifferent High Command mince-making machinery of a so-called 'strategic war effort'.It ranks alongside Red Badge of Courage, For Whom The Bell Tolls, The Debacle, & Regeneration as an epic narration of man's inhumanity & humanity.
  • (5/5)
    This book affected me emotionally more than any book I can remember. It is one of my favourites regardless. While there is much dark humour, the underlying messages about war and other societal commentary hit hard, as I am sure was intended. Definitely not suitable for young children or anyone uncomfortable reading about graphic violence, profanity, etc. Not a light read, but a meaningful one.
  • (4/5)
    A subversive classic.
  • (1/5)
    Just tried reading this book, and for one of the rare instances in life, threw it away in loathing. I love the classics (Orwell, Steinbeck, Algren, Twain, et al.), but this one was like trying to get through a literary tribute to Abbott & Costello... just filled with snarky one-liner jokes that fell flat pretty much every effort. Satire is one thing, canned-ham commentary that goes over 400 pages is too much. We get it; war is absurd. There just was very little original insight here. Cool, Heller came up with the Catch-22 term. Not cool he pounds it into your head every single scene.
  • (4/5)
    Groucho Marx channeled by angry, word-bloated 1950s English major on speed flying off the handle about war.

  • (4/5)
    Catch-22 is a very different book than what I normally read. It is very comical, crazy, and confusing, but Joseph Heller somehow mixes all of the craziness together to create a somewhat sensible piece of literature. This is not one of my favorite books, but it is quite funny at times.The story takes place during World War II. The protagonist, Yossarian, is part of one the US Air Force bomb squadrons stationed in Pianosa in Europe. The war is in full swing and the squadron members continue their missions to help with the war. The actual story line of the book is very confusing. It seems like the book is made up of small little anecdotes focusing on different member's lives and experiences, but they all tie together through common characters. Some of the stories seem to be out of order chronologically at some points and made me slightly confused. Also, the characters occasionally reference events that have not been talked about in depth, further adding to the confusion.The characters in the book were some of the best I have ever read about. Each had specific quirks and problems that persisted consistently throughout the book. Each interaction between them always seems realistic and crazy. Each character left a unique impression on me as I read through the book. Some characters were cowards, intellects, or just plain weird. I found myself becoming attached to them and every event had a much stronger emotional impact.Large picture aside, the dialogue and events in the book are very funny. The characters constantly contradict themselves and their compatriots and create ridiculous problems. Their antics lead to sometimes unwanted results, but they always take everything in good humor. Some of the events are much more serious however, but Heller was still able to put a slight twist in them to make it a little more funny.The contradictions, however, created a lot of confusion for me. I found myself lost and puzzled by what exactly happened at some points in the book. I would go back and try to reread the section and I usually was able to decipher the true meaning of what exactly occurred. However, there were a few times where I was forced to continue even though I did not have an understanding of what happen. This made the book a much harder chore to read than most, and it caused me to put down the book more times than I would have liked.Catch-22 is a amazingly funny book. The characters were some of the most special and witty characters I have ever met. The story was very intriguing and the dialogue was comical. There is no other book I have ever read that is anything like Catch-22. However, I found myself not wanting to read the book a few times. The events created a very confusing setting to follow. If you take the time to really read and understand the book, Catch-22 is very wonderful.
  • (4/5)
    major major majorly good.
  • (5/5)
    Best book ever? Quite possibly.
  • (4/5)
    Catch-22 is an insane book. It is 20th century absurdist to the max. I imagine it has remained popular mostly because Catch-22 is more descriptive of the American soldier experience than many of the non-fiction war books covering the same material. It's influence on shows like MASH is obvious. I did find the book disjointed at times. And I did find myself speed reading through some of the material. But at times I found myself laughing out laud. Overall I am glad I read this highly influential book.
  • (4/5)
    I guess it's all been said before Catch 22 being such an iconic book. But it was the first time I have read it and like everyone else that has reviewed it, I found it very funny, but also quite sad,as it really did bring home the futility of war and how the ordinary soldiers were really just used to boost the ego's of the upper echelons. And I could empathise with Yossarien wanting to escape from the people that wanted to kill him, or get him killed I should say!!It read like a farse in many places and that is indeed what war is in many ways.Not what I expected but I enjoyed it all the same, and now know that Catch 22 means that you will never ever win!! No matter what you try to do!!
  • (4/5)
    This is an excellent book. I don't think that a reader can really understand the true depths of the absurdity this great novel brings to the fore without actually having served in the military himself.
  • (3/5)
    This story of a group of american bomber pilots is told in a highly sarcastic way. The story provides insight into the obsurdity of war, the need for being true to one's morals, and the need for self-preservation. Joseph Heller seems to be fond of circular logic and contradictory statements. His book is sometimes humorous and sometimes insightful.
  • (4/5)
    Too many characters are introduced too quickly, the narrative leaps about confusingly and at times it's a real slog to get through, but this is still a great book, often incredibly funny and sometimes wickedly dark. And never mind great openings - this has one of my favourite final paragraphs in modern literature.
  • (2/5)
    I can understand why people love this book and I think it's an important read. However I wan't a fan of the style. I found it hard to fallow and I just didn't find myself interested in the plot. I couldn't make myself care. There where parts I enjoyed and the book is one of those timeless works of american literature so I don't feel like I wasted my time reading it. That why I'm giving this two stars and not one.
  • (5/5)
    When a novel varies from witty to outragously funny you know it's good. The characters stay in your head along with the diaglogue that made me laugh out loud...that got me some strange looks. People should read this book, it's too good to miss.
  • (4/5)
    This is one of my favorite books ever and when I saw it was finally issued in e-book format (50th anniversary edition with an intro by another great satirist, Chris Buckley), I took the opportunity to re-read it yet again. The incredibly funny satiric parts had me laughing like crazy as always (I do think that very few people can write funny, absurdist dialog like Heller could), but once again I kept coming back to the serious undertones. What stays with me is always the anti-war message, the stupidity of being willing to die for something when you don't recognize that "anything worth dying for, ...is certainly worth living for". Need one say more?
  • (1/5)
    I seem to recall that when I first read this novel I was entirely captivated. Having tried to re-read it some thirty years later I can only surmise that either I was very easily amused as a teenager or that I had far greater staying power then.I can't remember when I last found a book so completely tedious and overrated.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book! This story talks of the blind leading the blind in WW2, the dialogue was fantastic and the characters were very well developed.
  • (3/5)
    I've felt it remiss for a long time that I hadn't read this, and now I have. Do keep in mind, though, that this was my first time reading Catch-22, so my review should be treated as such. I liked this book. If I gave half stars, I'd have given it 3.5 overall. I didn't, however, love it. I was bewildered at first, and unable to keep straight who was who, and neither understood nor cared too much about the plot. However, about 1/3 of the way in I got more into it and became more invested in Yossarian and the others, learning all of their idiosyncracies. The second half of the book I would give 4 stars, the first half 3, hence my 3.5 stars overall.The plot got far more interesting when I started to care about the characters. The inevitability of Cathcart's raising the number of missions tugged at the heartstrings, and the turn of events with Nately's whore made me laugh mirthfully. Whatever one thinks of the plot, however, Heller is an absolute master at absurdist, illogical, dialogue, and his wit frequently kept me engrossed.
  • (5/5)
    Catch-22 is one of the finest "war books" ever written, and one of the most moving, despite the fact that it also an absolutely hilarious read. The early sections of the novel introduce the absurdism that drives the novel and the humorous tone of the book. Yet, the reader is consistently reminded of the horrors that lurk outside (such as the death of Snowden, frequently mentioned but only explained in the penultimate chapter). By the time the book gets to its grim late stages, the absurdity has shifted from the source of humor to the source of tragedy and wasteful treatment of human life. Though I speak of the absurdity in the singular, there are a number of critiques in Heller's novel. One is the initial definition of "Catch-22." Catch-22 is the principle that a soldier can only be sent home if he is insane. If you ask to be sent home, however, then you are clearly sane. The main character, Yossarian, is caught in this principle, realizing as he does that "people are trying to kill me." Yossarian puts war in the starkest possible terms, people he does not know want to murder him. His only option is to murder people he does not know. Why should he fly missions, and risk being killed by these people?The standard answer is "for principle." Catch-22 aims to undermine this reply, and sustain Yossarian's observations about the fundamental absurdity of war. It turns out that it is not only the Germans who are trying to kill him, but the bureaucratic machinations of the U.S. Army that is doing it, such as Colonel Cathcart's demand for more missions, and more dangerous missions, to increase his own prestige. Yossarian is not fighting for principle, he is fighting for his commanding officers and their motives, and these motives are rarely noble. Heller illustrates that the overriding principle that may justify the war (he avoids the justification for the war itself) has little to do with the risks that the soldiers must undertake.While there are a host of anti-war novels one can select from, none relish in the absurdity of the conflict better than Catch-22. Remarque, for example, is surely among the best in showing the consequences of war. The question that one faces after reading Remarque is: could any conflict be worth these terrible costs? The question one asks after reading Heller is somewhat different: why would anyone think that war is a sensible thing to do in the first place? Engaging with these questions is enough to make the novel worth reading.This is not, however, the lone virtue of the novel. The novel is masterfully constructed. It reads in many places as if it were written in a stream of consciousness style, with chapters shifting from scene to scene, in different times and places, and the novel is also not linear. Yet, the novel is subtly structured so that it is never disorganized or difficult to follow (except in the scenes where the discussion is deliberately hard to follow, see Milo Minderbender!). Indeed, it is a real joy to read, feeling at once both spontaneous and ingeniously crafted.In Yossarian, the Chaplain and Milo Minderbender, we are treated to three brilliant characters is a entertaining ensemble. Yossarian's madness is reason in a world of absurdity, while the Chaplain is the recognizable man, foibles and all. Milo is the capitalist, who runs the syndicate to ruthlessly (and successfully) turn a profit. From feeding the men chocolate covered cotton to bombing his own squadron, he represents single-minded pursuit of the bottom line. He's the perfect combination of hilarity and thought-provoking challenge (namely about the relationship between ethics and economic efficiency).Catch-22 brilliant interweaves scenes which are moving, scenes which are thoughtful and scenes which are hilarious. No personal library is complete without it.
  • (5/5)
    A rare book that insinutates its language and way of thinking into your everyday life. Hysterically funny and horrifying within the space of a page, or even paragraph, Catch-22 points out not only the absurdity of war but of many of the things people encounter throughout the day.I've read many books in my life, but Catch-22 has been my favorite and, I've thought for some time now, the best of them.
  • (5/5)
    Mr. Heller has documented insanity. Beautifully absurd. Full of metaphor and worldly lessons.
  • (4/5)
    I've read half of this book twice. It's bloody funny. I must try a third time and see if I can get all the way through.