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Pathfinder

Pathfinder

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Pathfinder

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (76 Bewertungen)
Länge:
648 Seiten
11 Stunden
Freigegeben:
Nov 23, 2010
ISBN:
9781442414273
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

From the author of Ender’s Game, the soon-to-be major motion picture!

A powerful secret. A dangerous path.

Rigg is well trained at keeping secrets. Only his father knows the truth about Rigg's strange talent for seeing the paths of people's pasts. But when his father dies, Rigg is stunned to learn just how many secrets Father had kept from him--secrets about Rigg's own past, his identity, and his destiny. And when Rigg discovers that he has the power not only to see the past, but also to change it, his future suddenly becomes anything but certain.

Rigg’s birthright sets him on a path that leaves him caught between two factions, one that wants him crowned and one that wants him dead. He will be forced to question everything he thinks he knows, choose who to trust, and push the limits of his talent…or forfeit control of his destiny.
Freigegeben:
Nov 23, 2010
ISBN:
9781442414273
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Orson Scott Card is the New York Times bestselling author of Ender’s Game.


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4.3
76 Bewertungen / 28 Rezensionen
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  • (5/5)
    Another excellent book by the master storyteller!A wonderful fantasy sci-fi story with complex characters, plot interactions, supernatural abilities, are time travel. The story weaves a multitude of interesting imaginative information and tidbits slowly putting them together piece by piece for those "ah ha" moments. Never a dull moment in the book. Mind stretching. Loved it!
  • (4/5)
    Card combines young adult fantasy and science-fiction. Pathfinder is a complex and sophisticated narrative involving space and time-travel --secrets and intrigues that keep you turning pages/listening. At the end, the author stated that he had achieved his goal and tht soe of the skipping around in time was necessary for the story. The political intrigue is complicated. In production, multiple narrators were used for the same character...very distracting.
  • (4/5)
    Synposis: This is sort of two stories interwoven, but seemingly separate until the very end. The main story follows a young boy named Rigg who was raised as a trapper by his father. His father is his educator and teaches him much more than what Rigg thinks is important to be a trapper. When his father dies in the forest, Rigg's life is sent on a new journey in which he learns why his father taught him all the lessons he had taught. This part of the tale feels more like fantasy, taking place in the past. Rigg has "special powers" and stumbles upon others who have special powers as well. The world they live in, Garden, is a pre-indsutrial revolutionized society, and he spends a lot of time walking.

    The second story being told, follows Ram, a pilot on a starship sent to colonize other worlds. This is a much smaller bit of the story, usually only a page or two at the beginning of some chapters. It seems to have no relevance to Rigg's story and is much more clearly sci-fi in nature. When the two stories converge, a whole new respect for Card's writing is achieved!

    Review: Another brilliant, multifaceted story that Card shares with us. The only thing I didn't like about it was that I started it shortly after reading Lost Gate, hoping that it was a sequel. Sometimes it is not clear through the course of the story when a book is a sequel for Card. Discarding the second story, I really was thinking it might be a sort of prequel to Lost gate. It has nothing to do with Lost Gate. As long as you know that going in, I can't imagine there being any complaints! I now have second books to two series to anticipate!!
  • (4/5)
    Science fiction from the master! Two stories, separated by over 11,000 years, but through time travel each affects the other. Ram is the lone awake human pilot in a ship traveling hundreds of light years to a new, habitable planet. The other humans are preserved in "stasis" and will be awakened when the new planet is safe and ready for them. The ships are being run by computers and "expendables": human-looking cyborgs with a pre-programmed mission to save the human race from extinction. 11,000 years later, Rigg discovers upon his father's death that he may be the missing prince in his land (known as a wallfold). Rigg has the ability to see the paths of everyone who's ever passed through a location -- every path looks slightly different, and he can follow them and track where they've been and tell when they were there. His best friend Umbo has the ability to slow down time, and is learning to travel through time. Both boys leave their village to search out Rigg's mother, the former queen, and his sister, who has her own bizarre time-shifting talent. Their epic journey causes some violent political problems, and the truth about Rigg's family reaches all the way back to the mysterious origins of their planet. This is a long (657 pages) and complicated scifi novel, for those who need a really good tale with lots of imaginative possibilities! Marketed as book one of a new series, we should expect more from Card in the next few years. Strong 8th grade readers and up.
  • (3/5)
    Have to confess... just could not finish this book. It started strong for me, but I couldn't stick it out... it really slowed down for me when Rigg was on the boat, and almost dies. I can see that many people loved it, so maybe I'll pick it up again some year, but for now... I just couldn't take anymore of it.
  • (3/5)
    Although it is somewhat necessary, Card spends too much time making his characters discuss the time paradox. This makes the story a slower pace than it ought to be
  • (5/5)
    A very different series than Ender's Game, Card weaves a very intricate but clear plot. It is a bit young for me personally but I was still intrigued. I'm interested in the worldbuilding, and I hope to hear more of it.
  • (3/5)
    Definitely not as good as some of Orson Scott Card's other work. A very interesting story and original ideas with a fantastic beginning, but it drags a bit and takes far too long to get to the point.
  • (5/5)
    Pathfinder by Orson Scott Card is a wonderful young adult work of speculative fiction. Combining the best of science fiction and fantasy, readers follow the adventures of two characters living in different times. Card applies the best of his storytelling techniques such as epic journeys, time travel, and magical powers. At times I felt like I was reading one of his earlier works such as Folk of the Fringe or Alvin. Characters with unique powers come together using their individual and combined abilities to help them along their journey.I was particularly drawn to the science fiction elements related to the paradox of time travel. It was fascinating to see how Card created and applied his own set of rules, then immersed his characters in situations that challenged their thinking and abilities. It was refreshing to see how the characters used their minds rather than their muscles to solve problems. The lengthy book flew by as the plot became increasingly sophisticated.Although the surprise ending and numerous twists are exciting, teen readers are likely to anticipate the conclusion after reading the first couple chapters. However the book remains engaging throughout because the story is really about the relationships among the characters and the group's quest rather than a big finale.Since first reading the short story version of Ender's Game in the late 1970s, I've been a huge fan. I continue to be impressed by the characters and worlds created by this master storyteller. I highly recommend this for readers of all ages and look forward to more books in this excellent new series.
  • (4/5)
    Orson Scott Card did it again. He managed to use the parallel story theme to bring alive yet another great book!

    I really enjoy his technique of taking the beginning of a chapter and telling us bits of the parallel before getting into the main story line. Just as in Ender's Game we're left wondering how those two story lines will converge. Here in Pathfinder Orson takes a bit longer than in EG to tie them together by using ever chapter of the book to do so.

    In this story we have a bright young boy with a special gift, he doesn't know why he has it but his father trains him to hone his ability to see every path from every living thing that ever lived. What would you do with this gift? Well Rigg was told by his father to find his sister and is soon catapulted into a journey across the land to find out who he really is and find his sister.

    With the help of a few friends who have their own talents, Rigg takes this journey and they combine their talents make their way and take care of each other.

    If I tell you anymore, I'll spoil it for you but know this...

    Orson takes 661 pages to tell you a simple story, with an intricate plot intertwined with a complicated take on on a certain kind of travel we wish we all could take...

    Definitely put this on your to read list!! Might as well put the other two books in the trilogy on your list as well. I have!

    Cheers! (Fist bump)
  • (4/5)
    For over 600 pages, it went pretty fast. Every chapter opens with a page or two continuation of the story of Ram and the Expendables' (Human-resembling, subservient robots) jump through space to colonize a new planet. The jump is made using imaginary technology, and the crew discovers new things about physics they couldn't have learned without making the jump. This futuristic space story ties in with the humble world in which the main character Rigg lives. Rigg can see trails people leave behind as they move forward in time. He embarks on a journey to find lost members of his family and learns the truth behind the mysteries of his world. Card manages to write great books that happen to be science fiction. The fact that there is a sci-fi element to them grabs my interest, but he moves the story along with character development and relationships. This book embraces that same formula. I enjoyed it and can't wait for the next one.
  • (3/5)
    Pathfinder is definitely an interesting read, if occasionally a confusing one.
  • (4/5)
    Typical of Card's style (monotone characters and preachy narrative), but an imaginative take on time-travel as a paranormal psychic ability. Advanced juniors could read it.
  • (4/5)
    Clever. Well-crafted. Expertly told. Thank you Mr. Card for another grand adventure.
  • (3/5)
    Following someone by tracing their scent is old school-- this kid can see the paths left behind.
  • (2/5)
    Remember those math problems from school that gave so many of us nightmares? Like, “Two trains are on the same track a distance 100 km apart heading towards one another, each at a speed of 50 km/h. A fly starting out at the front of one train, flies towards the other at a speed of 75 km/h. Upon reaching the other train, the fly turns around and continues towards the first train. How many kilometers does the fly travel before getting squashed in the collision of the two trains?”Now, imagine a whole book of over 650 pages that makes it seem like you are caught inside such a math puzzle for the entire book! A book that has to explain to you in an appendix such facts as “the [space] ship made it through that first jump … 31 light years from Earth times 19 squared”…! A book all about characters who travel back and forth in time but are always arguing about whether they have influenced each other in the past or in the future, or whether they are making time slow down or time speed-up, or if the current incarnation of the character needs the future self to go back and interact with the past self, and did that mean the past really happened or never had happened or never would happen or….? Are you screaming yet? Because I was!!!Somewhere in all of this there is a story, but to me, it got almost totally loss in all the craziness. What follows is typical dialogue in the book, occurring in this exchange between the characters named Loaf and Umbo, after Future-Umbo went back in time to deliver a warning to the character Rigg before disaster could strike. Present-Umbo wants to figure out how to do it so he makes sure Future-Umbo knows how to do it:"Loaf: “…you learned how to go back in time … delivered the warnings, and now everything is happening differently. So why do you need to deliver the messages this time at all?”Umbo: “‘Because none of that has happened yet, so now it won’t,’ said Umbo. ‘I have to learn how to travel in time so I can go back this time and deliver the same message again.’”Loaf: “But you didn’t get the message twice, did you? So why deliver it twice?”‘I don’t know,’ said Umbo. ‘I don’t think it is twice. I think there’s only one message, and I still have to deliver it.’Loaf: ‘But you only know you have to deliver it because you already did. And that’s the point. You already did.”…Umbo: “I have to do it because I know I already did, only when I did it, it was the future, so I have to get to the future in order to come back and do what I already did…"Gaaaah!!! And this goes on and on and on!!! Not only in this particular passage, but repeatedly, throughout the book!Yes, I made it to the end, but I’m not sure how or why. Maybe my future self told my past self I had to do it to ensure my current self had another book to add to my list of books read for the year....Evaluation: Ender’s Game is one of my favorite reads. But this book? It was just painful for me. And there is a sequel! Gaaaaah! And no! I am not reading it! Not my present self, my future self, or my past self! None of us!
  • (4/5)
    This is a tough book to process for me. Orson Scott Card has done something so different and strange with time travel in Pathfinder and, while fascinating, it also made my head hurt, to be perfectly honest.The story of Rigg was fascinating, as was the alternating story of Ram. I was thankful for the hand-holding that each character did as the story progressed because, without it, I would have been perfectly lost.It's difficult to talk about the book in detail because the story unfolds in such a way that speaking, even just about the characters, reveals a bit too much. I do have to say though that while, at times a bit unbelievable, Rigg was a fascinating character and one that had me firmly on his side at all times.Fun, interesting science fiction book but a bit heavy for a younger teenager. Although if that teenager enjoyed the Ender series then I would say they would love this one as well.
  • (5/5)
    Very hard to put down! Excellent character development and story telling captured my attention immediately and made me care about what happened, even though some of the time travel theory is a little far-fetched. But, it made me think, "is that really possible?"
  • (3/5)
    Overall I thought this book was okay. It was slow moving at times, and I will probably not finish the book.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book! I've read it twice already, and will probably go through it again before reading the next in the series.Card uses time in such a clever way, and I am a sucker for the space time continuum. Thanks for another awesome book, Orson Scott Card.
  • (4/5)
    Rigg lives in a small country town with his father trapping animals to survive. They spend hours in the woods with his father teaching him languages, diplomacy, how to use his powers to track paths and survival, until his father dies. Then Rigg tries to save a young boy from going over a waterfall and has to flee town in a hurry. He and Umbo, brother of the dead child start on a journey with instructions left by his father to the city where Rigg will get ahold of his wealth. As they journey they find much more then they bargained for.

    This was a really interesting book even though it took me forever to get through. Rigg is an intriguing and likable character. I also liked being able to learn what happened in the past and being able to figure out exactly what happened and how the world got to be the way it was. The scientific concepts were interesting and sometimes they took a little bit of time for me to grasp but they weren't so complicated that I gave up. The world building was pretty incredible and I liked that it was such an integral part of the plot so I didn't feel as though it was wasting time. I really enjoyed this which is pretty amazing cause I am not normally such a scyfy fan.
  • (5/5)
    This young adult book can be confusing at times when it talks about time travel, the characters are traveling back and forth and having many conversations about the effects of everything they are doing. The characters themselves are often confused and arguing over the facts of time travel. That portion aside, the story is great. It’s intriguing and twisting and many things come up that I didn’t expect.All of the characters are fully developed, complete, and different from one another. Each one’s personality is strong and realistic. There are many amusing moments in which the dialogue is the key. Quirky and sarcastic characters play well off of one another and that kind of humor is wonderful in a young adult book. I think the concept of the storyline will appeal to many adults as well as the older young adult crowd. (Too young and they might get lost in all the back and forth of what’s going on.) I’m looking forward to reading other books by the author, he is new to me, but as I have found out he is a very well known author in the sci-fi/fantasy realm. This book could be made into a really great movie if they could figure out how to shoot it well. It reads like a movie, quickly moving from one point to the next and entertaining throughout.
  • (5/5)
    I loved the book. It has a unique plot, great setup, good character development. My only criticism is the ending, I want a nice wrap up before the next book, not cliffhangers!
  • (4/5)
    As enjoyable as the Alvin Maker books.... the slight dichotomy of the opposing timelines make for a cliffhanger ending, but who'll be surprised over that?
    Will continue with the series.
  • (4/5)
    Complicated but good. I appreciate the explanation at the end!
  • (5/5)
    Nice beginning! Let's see where it ends! Well done once again Card!
  • (5/5)
    Interesting concepts of time folds and space folds...but sometimes a little convoluted, guess you need that level of discussion about time folds to understand the possibilities
  • (1/5)
    yeah, so this one doesn't seem to be in english.