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Aphrodite’s Hat

Bewertungen:
4.5/5 (3 Bewertungen)
Länge:
209 Seiten
3 Stunden
Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Oct 28, 2010
ISBN:
9780007416837
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

A wonderful collection of stories from the much-loved Salley Vickers.

The stories in this long-awaited collection by Salley Vickers all deal with psychological aspects of love: love given and withheld, love craved and lost, love met and disappointed; the differing shades of loves between friends, between parents and children, between children and other adults; love even, in one case, for a pet.

Psychologically acute, sharply written in lucid and often witty prose, these stories, set in Venice, Greece and Rome as well as London and the English countryside, take us into the complex geography of the human heart. Sometimes joyous and humorous, sometimes melancholy and poignant, this collection confirms Salley Vickers' reputation as one of our most subtle and engaging writers.

Herausgeber:
Freigegeben:
Oct 28, 2010
ISBN:
9780007416837
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Salley Vickers’ subtle, witty style and clear-eyed observation of human nature has been compared to Penelope Fitzgerald and Barbara Pym. She has worked as a university teacher of literature, specialising in Shakespeare, and in adult education, where she specialised in the literature of the ancient world. She is a trained analytical psychologist and lectures widely on the connections between literature, psychology and religion. She divides her time between London, Venice and the West Country.


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4.3
3 Bewertungen / 3 Rezensionen
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  • (4/5)
    A slight, but enjoyable, collection of short stories, including several modern "ghost" stories, around the theme of love. They do not have the emotional depth, but do touch the emotions.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent collection of short stories, each one to be savoured.
  • (4/5)
    The cover of this collection of Salley Vickers short stories is Cupid Complaining to Venus by Lucas Cranach the Elder (1525). Here a mewling cupid is fighting off a swarm of bees his mother oblivious to his distress. The goddess of love stands almost naked apart from her flamboyant hat – revealing and concealing, an enigmatic smile on her face. She knows much but seems unwilling to tell all. The stories behind the cover she decorates discloses human hopes, frailties, desires and the delights, fears and inexplicable chances given to love and lovers. There’s also the obverse that sometimes desires are obscured and chances missed. Echoing the troubled relationship on the cover there are wicked and good stepmothers; one greeted with open arms and the other trumped by her disliked stepson. Mrs Radzinsky’s an old crone accused by her Residents’ Association of being an ageing prostitute but who turns into an Aphrodite herself spreading love and blessings. Maternal jealousy creates havoc in a Hansel and Gretel-type story with dangerous implications as a little girl grows up. There’s a delightful unexpected Christmas birth with rather miraculous parentage; myth subsumed into ordinary life. And while one mother finds her true love through Matthew Arnold’s poem The Buried Life, there’s another distressed child in the background. The joyful sits alongside the tragic and there a slightly creepy festive pantomime, friendships altered irrevocably by love affairs and a flapjack in St Ives leads to an interesting development, a May-December relationship and a happy if snatched happy ending. The Indian Child is an amusing reimagining of the Theseus Titantia story from the viewpoint of the little boy argued over and the cause of such chaos to Shakespeare’s mortals – Will makes an appearance himself. Oh and I do hope it’s true that anyone can ring the National Gallery and be put ‘through to a young man who was an art historian’ who proceeds to explain the iconography of the Cranach painting.