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Editor’s Note

“Funny & vulnerable…”

Alternating between present & past, “Blue is the Warmest Color” is devastating, funny & at times achingly vulnerable. Its message, that “only love will save the world,” is as stunning & necessary as it is straightforward.
Scribd Editor

From the Publisher

A New York Times bestseller

The original graphic novel adapted into the film Blue Is the Warmest Color, winner of the Palme d'Or at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival; released in the US this fall by IFC Films/Sundance Selects

In this tender, bittersweet, full-color graphic novel, a young woman named Clementine discovers herself and the elusive magic of love when she meets a confident blue-haired girl named Emma: a lesbian love story for the ages that bristles with the energy of youth and rebellion and the eternal light of desire.

First published in France by Glénat, the book has won several awards, including the Audience Prize at the Angoulême International Comics Festival, Europe's largest.

The live-action, French-language film version of the book, entitled Blue Is the Warmest Color, won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival in May 2013. Directed by director Abdellatif Kechiche and starring Lea Seydoux and Adele Exarchopoulos, the film generated both wide praise and controversy. It will be released in the US through Sundance Selects/IFC Films.

Julie Maroh is an author and illustrator originally from northern France.

Topics: Made into a Movie, Lesbian Characters, France, First Love, Romantic, and Heartbreaking

Published: Arsenal Pulp Press on
ISBN: 9781551525457
List price: $19.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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