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Run

Bewertungen:
4/5 (100 Bewertungen)
Länge:
333 Seiten
6 Stunden
Freigegeben:
May 1, 2012
ISBN:
9781408822494
Format:
Buch

Beschreibung

Tip and Teddy are becoming men under the very eyes of their adoptive father, Bernard Doyle. A student at Harvard, Tip is happiest in a lab, whilst Teddy thinks he has found his calling in the Church, and both are increasingly strained by their father's protective plans for them. But when they are involved in an accident on an icy road, the Doyles are forced to confront certain truths about their lives, how the death of Doyle's wife Bernadette has affected the family, and an anonymous figure who is always watching.
Freigegeben:
May 1, 2012
ISBN:
9781408822494
Format:
Buch

Über den Autor

Ann Patchett is originally from Los Angeles and is a graduate of Sarah Lawrence College. She is the author of four novels, The Patron Saint of Liars, The Magician’s Assistant, Taft and Bel Canto, which was the winner of the 2002 Pen/Faulkner Award. She lives in Nashville.


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  • There were some people who had the ability to tell other people what was worth wanting, could tell them in a way that was so powerful that the people who heard them suddenly had their eyes opened to what had been withheld from them all along.


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  • (2/5)
    I had high hopes for this book, after loving Bel Canto, but found it disappointingly mediocre.
  • (5/5)
    Moving tale of a Boston family - their love, fears, and secrets - Patchett at her finest
  • (4/5)
    OK, I didn't think it was her best book. I never really got the picture of why all the characters were part of the story-line. Clever plot; and the race-issue was truly subtle as an under-current. #josephkingreview
  • (4/5)
    I am one of those readers who really appreciate Patchett's Bel Canto, except for the ending, so I was curious to see how I would react to this one. While not as absorbing a read for me, I can see how Patchett - by her own self confession - crafts different stories with a similar basis point: an event or situation occurs that brings a set of strangers together, and their lives change as a result. Patchett's characters are real, as are the situations in her stories and their interactions, although Kenya did come across to me as being wise beyond her mere 11-years, probably due to Patchett's admittance that she doesn't like to write child characters into her stories. The story flows so well that it is a bit of a mind-blow to realize that outside of the closing and some memory ramblings, the brunt of the story takes place over a very short, 24 hour period. This story is filled with everything: politics, religion, race, adoption, social class to family and community relationships. It almost felt as though Patchett was trying to cram too much in, so some of the author's message that the story is about matriarchal lines of a family gets a bit lost in the drama. While Bel Canto still remains my favorite Patchett read so far, this was a pretty darn good read, even though the American politics aspects were just so-so for me.
  • (4/5)
    Good book, engaging.
  • (4/5)
    After trying for years to create a large family Bernadette and Bernard Doyle have only had one child. They decide to adopt two black boys, Tip and Teddy, to add to their small family of three. Then Bernadette dies and the newly widowed Bernard is left to raise his three young sons on his own. The book really kicks into gear when the two adopted sons are in college. One night a stranger shoves Tip out of the way of an oncoming car and he narrowly escapes disaster. This act forces the Doyle family’s world to intersect with the strangers in some unexpected ways. The majority of the action takes place in a single 24 hour period, though it feels like a much longer stretch of time. Patchett really manages to develop each of her characters, allowing the reader to become invested in their lives. Out of everyone, Tip’s story really resonated with me the most. He’s intelligent and intense while his brother Teddy is endearing and easy to get along with. This book was all about family to me. It questions what makes someone family and what you’re willing to do for family. It made me think about what creates the bonds between people and how experience or even coincidence sometimes makes strangers become family. It was interesting to read an interview with the author saying that to her the book was about politics. It’s fascinating that books manage to take on lives of their own after they’re written and can mean different things to each reader. Side Note: If you’re looking for a Patchett book to start with, Bel Canto is my absolute favorite of hers.
  • (5/5)
    On a cold and snowy night in Boston, an adopted son of the former mayor is almost run over by an SUV. At the last moment he’s shoved out of its path by an unknown woman who is hit by the vehicle. In the hospital his family meets her family, an eleven-year-old girl who says that her mother is his birthmother. Patchett tells a richly textured tale of family relationships, bereavement, spirituality, parental expectations and achievements that subtly juxtaposes economic divisions in American society.
  • (3/5)
    Nothing terribly amazing about this book. It's my second book by this author, and she seems to like focusing on one event for the majority of the story, with flashbacks and minor incidents adding on. The book is almost like a short story, in that it is very focused on a particular event and the small cast of characters, but because it is a novel in length, you get much more background to the characters and insight into the events.

    This story moves at a slower pace, but for an audiobook in the car, it was just fine. Somewhat predictable, but I liked it.
  • (3/5)
    This book took place all in the span of 48 hours. A novel that read like a thriller, I couldn't hardly put it down. The characters were well developed, and they all were extremely different but I had a sense of sympathy for each of them. I loved the way the book revolved around how a person can be involved with random people in their life. Interesting theory, and wonderful read.
  • (4/5)
    I was really worried when I saw summaries of this novel saying it was about race and took place over the course of 24 hours. I feared Ms. Patchett had re-written "Crash". But no. I thought it was quite elegant. The story is about two brothers, who are black, who have been adopted by an Irish Catholic, politically involved, Boston couple. The day when the action takes place is snowy and cold, and Patchett does a beautiful job of describing the scenery, creating a lovely backdrop.

    I was not as taken with the book as I was with Bel Canto, because I found it a bit reserved - as if the passion had been edited out. But still, I give it high marks for engaging characters and making the plot believable.
  • (3/5)
    Parts of this story didn't really work for me, but I stayed engaged. I listened to an interview with Patchett in which she said she is not a great stylist, but she pays a lot of attention to structure and moving the story along, and that's true. The premise was interesting, even if at times unbelievable.
  • (4/5)
    As usual, Ann Patchett does it for me. The amazing touching story of a complicated family that loves each other just the same. She describes real family feelings without sugar coating. But as usual, her story takes an unexpected twist. Her endings always surprise me, and I'm never quite sure if I like them. Still, an excellent read.
  • (2/5)
    I had finally read Bel Canto last year, and I really wished I'd read it sooner. It was such an amazing work, and although I haven't gotten around to reading anything else by her yet, I got the chance to read this one pretty soon after it came out. I expected something if not as good as Bel Canto, at least comparable, but I was disappointed.
    It was a pretty quick read, but I found myself finishing the book just for the sake of finishing it. There was something about the pacing that bothered me that I can't quite put my finger on, and I think that Patchett is capable of showing human connections that run much deeper than they did in this novel. As another reviewer stated, it felt as though she was only scratching the surface of these characters - they didn't have nearly as much depth as they were capable of having.
    Overall, the story was an interesting one, and it has a lot of potential to be a great novel - it just doesn't quite get there.
  • (3/5)
    Run By Ann Patchett is a novel set in Boston. It is the story of a white family who adopted two black boys. Tip and Teddy are brothers and are adopted shortly after Teddy’s birth. Their birth mother cannot keep the boys and insists that they be adopted together. As the story progresses you see how the father, Bernard Boyle tries to give his sons every opportunity. Boyle is a former Mayor who leads a well ordered life. He is well connected in his community and is respected by many for his personal choices in life. A severe storm, an almost fatal accident and a chance meeting all come together to cause major changes in the family structure. The boys were raised without a mother and that is part of the focus of this book, however, and there is also a third son, Sullivan who for me plays a balancing role in this sometimes too sweet story. From learning about ichthyology and the study of fish to enterprise and work in Africa, to a potential Olympic track star running during a winter’s storm, there are many differences in the personalities of the young family members in this novel. The story tells of some of the challenges when blending families, especially when some of the children are of color and other are not; but mostly it is a story of a family that lives with loss, daily choices and love. The characters are well developed and the story line is entertaining, but was not a favorite selection for me. I gave it a 3.
  • (3/5)
    Well I really don't know how I feel about this book. This is the first book by Ann Patchett that I have read. I enjoyed the book but left with mixed feelings about it.This is the story of the Doyle's. You have Bernadette, and Bernard Doyle and their son Sullivan and adoptive sons Tip and Teddy. After the death of Bernadette the boys feel the lose significantly. They are raised by just Bernard. It is an interesting story especially once you meet their biological mother. They meet her by accident, literally. She is hit by a car when she pushes one of her son's out of the way. They also meet her daughter Kenya. She is a very interesting character.I don't want to reveal too much about the story but the ending was what left me with a feeling of being unsure.
  • (4/5)
    Another great book by Patchett! Once again, as with Bel Canto, she slowly and carefully develops a full cast of characters that, by the end of the book, you feel you have known all your life. In Run the first chapter is almost a prelude, with the telling of the family story of the heirloom Virgin Mary statue that looks just like Bernadette, new wife of Bernard Doyle. After their son Sullivan is born and no other children are forthcoming Doyle and Bernadette adopt two black boys shortly before Bernadette’s untimely death. The second chapter then jumps a couple of decades to when the boys are finishing college and in graduate school. Over a twenty-four hour period during a snowstorm an accident changes their lives forever and introduces a new twist on family, love and loyalty.
  • (2/5)
    This book left me very flat. I am a steadfast fan of Patchett and her beautiful, fluid writing style, but this story was completely unbelievable to me.

    The adoption of two boys, the mother who never truly leaves them, the older brother with issues, the father who is good and yet vacant, and the young girl who runs like the wind. Too, too much going on here for one 24-hour period. Introductions to all, but no meat to any of it.

    Sullivan: What is the story on the Sullivan's stealing? What truly motivated him and how was he caught? How does he feel now? What is the sarcasm hiding, deep in his psyche?

    Teddy and Tip: They seem very well adjusted for two black boys adopted by the Irish family who turns out to be Boston royalty. And that sea-change at the end, only to go back again. Really? Are they that selfish?

    Tennessee and Kenya: Is it just me, or do these names reek of what Spike Lee would call "coonery"?

    The statue: We are introduced to a family dispute at the beginning to have it go nowhere. And the statue's ownership at the end surely must have caused some controversy...nothing.

    So much more could have been done with this 24-hour period. Instead of taking on all characters and painting a thin layer of each, I would have preferred a more compact story with greater detail. However, if you've seen Patchett interviewed about her books, you know enough to not criticize or ask for more detail without extracting some venom.

    If you like Patchett, read this so you will have her entire repertoire, but don't expect another Bel Canto.
  • (3/5)
    A good read but I enjoyed Bel Canto more.
  • (5/5)
    This is the 3rd novel I’ve read by Patchett and have found all three to be great portraits of people thrown together, adjusting to the circumstances of their shared experience. In Bell Canto the experiment was carried to the most extreme as a revolutionary coop brought various groups in to forced confinement. In the Magician’s Assistant, we fine Sabine, being uniquely connected to her husband’s family, only after his death, a family she never knew existed. And now in Run we have the Doyle family. Their widowed Father and 3 sons family structure is pushed aside, literally, when Tennessee Moser saves Tip from being hit by a car. Her involvement is at first questioned and then revealed as a motherly instinct. It is Kenya, her daughter, however, that unites the Doyles to a single purpose, a purpose above their own as they take on the raising and nurturing of this gifted runner. Patchett’s writing is clear and observant. The passage of Kenya running on the Harvard track is one I will long remember; something I have felt myself in seeing my speedy daughter on the athletic field. Also of interest was the structure of the novel which takes place in a 24 hour period. It begins on a snowy night in Boston where Doyle and his two adopted sons, Tip and Teddy, are scheduled to attend a Jesse Jackson lecture. In a brief argument Tip distractedly steps off the curb and into the path of an oncoming SUV. Even though there are flashbacks that go back three generations and side notes that help explain why the oldest son, Sullivan, has stayed away from home, the lives of these 6 people gets fully explained and intertwined by the time they go back to the hospital the next day to see the women who saved Tip’s life and gave Tip and Teddy life.
  • (4/5)
    A sad, yet hopeful tale of the complicated love of parents and children. Bernard Doyle, a prominent white Bostonian along with his wife adopts two Afro-American male children. Patchett weaves a convoluted yet engrossing story that comes full circle.
  • (4/5)
    good reader. good story.kept having to return this to the library.
  • (4/5)
    My first Ann Patchett book and I really enjoyed it!
  • (3/5)
    I am going to have to reassess my stance on epilogues in books. Set This House in Order soured me on them for the nonce. Watership Down has one and that's okay, and Ann Patchett's wonderful Bel Canto has one and that's okay, but in this -- especially since the jacket touts that all the action is set within 24 hours -- and in the Ruff it feels like a convenience.
  • (2/5)
    Major meh. The character were so flat, in their boxes. The smart kid, the friendly kid, the mess-up. Took me forever to finish. I was really unimpressed.
  • (5/5)
    I almost never read contemporary fiction, yet couldn't put this compelling novel down. It's a masterpiece of weaving threads of lives, thoughts, ambitions, and moralities together into a fabric of prose.Bernard Doyle has lost his wife to illness, his oldest son to get-rich-quick-at-the-expense-of-others morality, his older adopted son to academia and his youngest to dreamy hopes of priesthood. Yet one night after a Jesse Jackson speech to which he drags the younger two, all the Doyle's lives are changed when Tip is pushed out of the path of an oncoming vehicle by a passing woman. In a moment not only does the younger Doyles' birth mother enter all of their lives, but so does her 11 year old daughter. Not only does this spur changes in everyone's inter-relations, it changes how they think of themselves, their futures, and their dreams.This examination of hope, personal growth and family proceeds to investigate the issues of what it means to be a parent, what is owed to family, and what is owed to the self. I highly recommend it.
  • (4/5)
    ***SPOILER ALERT!!*** While the plot of this novel had an interesting mix of good nuggets (racially mixed family, adoption & subsequent discovery of birth mother, mild amounts of politics & scandal, etc.), my overall feeling was "meh" after reading this story. I really wanted to know more about these characters, but it was almost like a teaser, and I never did feel like there was enough emotion expressed throughout a majority of the story. The writing was decent enough, but I wasn't grabbed by this one.
  • (5/5)
    In an interview, Ann Patchett said that to her the book was about politics, to her publisher it was about family, but she wants every reader to see in it what he/she will. Tennesee Moser gave her baby up for adoption. A very short time later, she decided she wanted her boys to be together, so (through the adoption agency) she requested and got permission for the new family to also adopt her little boy. Of course, when the white mayor of Boston adopts a black baby, and soon after another little black boy, it is easy for Tennessee to figure out where her children are. Ten years later, she finds herself raising a daughter named Kenya. Throughout the years, she and Kenya stand in the shadows of her boys' lives, watching over them. Other than flashbacks and flash-forwards, this book takes place on a winter day in which Tennessee sees one of her boys back up (while arguing with his father) into the path of an oncoming SUV. She pushes him to safety, putting herself in the path of the oncoming vehicle. At this point, the paths of the two families begin to intertwine. The characters are believable, likeable good people with flaws. Their lives all change on this day, in some ways for the better, in some ways for the worse. The novel is beautifully crafted and it was a pleasure to listen to.
  • (5/5)
    This is a beautifully told story about a car accident that suddenly transforms a Boston family. Suddenly, relationships are all mixed up and allegiences aren't what they appear to be. A fascinating study of relationships and how they can change. Also a good look at race relations without a load of white guilt.
  • (4/5)
    Run, by Ann Patchett, is a deeply satisfying novel about family. In particular, it is about individual responsibility within ever-widening realms of family loyalty. By family, the author is not referring merely to that small group of people to which each of us are related by bonds of blood, marriage, or adoption, but more importantly, the wider family of friends, community, and nation. At the center of this novel are the Doyles, a powerful Boston Catholic political family. The father is a lawyer who believes strongly in the importance of public service. He worked hard to serve his community and eventually became the city’s mayor. But that career ended abruptly when his eldest son became involved in a Kennedy-Chappaquiddick-like scandal that ruined the father’s chance for reelection. Relentlessly, the father tries to steer each of his three sons toward a public service career. He dreams one of his sons will become President of the United States. All have the talent and brains, but none of the boys are interested. Each has completely different ideas about what he wants to do with his life. Not one son has bought into the father’s deep abiding beliefs in wider family responsibility—that is, not until the fateful 24-hour period that defines the entire scope of this novel. After this day is ended, everyone and everything about this family is changed profoundly.Run has a large cast of main characters, all vying for the lead role. These characters have significant economic, racial, and personal differences. They are interesting people, and the reader learns to care about them. There are no villains in this book. Everyone is redeemable. But these characters are not very different from the everyday people that most of us know in real life. They are not anything like the odd assortment of completely unique characters that populated Bel Canto, and this alone will no doubt disappoint many fans. But, all the characters in this book are vividly real—after all this is what Patchett does best. In addition, the quality of the writing is outstanding: Patchett’s prose positively soars! It is clear, clean writing that doesn’t take your breath away, or distract from the storyline, but it shows mastery, quietly and sparingly, in every word.Bel Canto left readers with a loving heartach. Run leaves its readers with a contented smile. Bel Canto gave readers characters that they will remember and care about for a long time. I am afraid that will not happen with the characters in Run. These characters will probably soon be forgotten after the reader has moved on to a few more novels. Why? Perhaps we need the shock of an unhappy ending to sear a set of characters into our minds forever; perhaps we are just not too interested in the overall larger family values message; or perhaps we long for stories about people completely different from ourselves.All this being said, readers will still find Run satisfying, enjoyable, and definitely worth reading. But don’t expect to be swept off your feet. This is not that type of book.
  • (3/5)
    I've loved Ann Patchett's books in the past and so was really looking forward to reading Run. The book was good but left me wanting more. Although in many respects I could easily relate to the characters, I didn't feel invested in them at the end. A good read but disappointing based on my other experiences with Ann Patchett.